Next Article in Journal
Plant Growth Promotion and Biocontrol of Pythium ultimum by Saline Tolerant Trichoderma Isolates under Salinity Stress
Previous Article in Journal
Local Challenges and Successes Associated with Transitioning to Sustainable Food System Practices for a West Australian Context: Multi-Sector Stakeholder Perceptions
Open AccessArticle

Assessing Students’ Knowledge on WASH-Related Diseases

1
Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Middle Eastern Studies, Lund University, 22100 Lund, Sweden
2
Pan African University Institute of Water and Energy Sciences Including Climate Change, B.P. 119 Pôle Chetouane, Tlemcen 13000, Algeria
3
Department of Water Resources & Environmental Engineering, University of Ilorin, P.M.B 1515, Ilorin 240003, Nigeria
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(11), 2052; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16112052
Received: 18 April 2019 / Revised: 5 June 2019 / Accepted: 6 June 2019 / Published: 10 June 2019
Water-, sanitation-, and hygiene-related diseases are killing many people each year in developing countries, including Rwanda, and children under the age of five are the most vulnerable. This research assessed human waste disposal practices, knowledge on diseases caused by contact with human faeces, and knowledge on causes and prevention of selected WASH-related diseases. One thousand one hundred and seventy-three students were interviewed out of 2900 students. The results showed, regarding students’ waste disposal practices, that 96.3% use latrines, 20.5% practice open defecation in bushes, and 3.2% defecate in water bodies. Regarding knowledge on diseases caused by contact with human faeces, 56.9% responded that they were aware of cholera, 26.5% of diarrhoea, 2.2% of dysentery, 0.3% of malaria, 0.1% of shigellosis, and 3.8% of typhoid. The majority of the respondents, between 50–99%, could not identify the main causes of the WASH-related diseases. This paper also showed that students lack health knowledge in regard to WASH-related diseases’ causes and prevention. Therefore, the provision of water and sanitation infrastructures should go with the provision of health education on how to avoid these diseases and possible ways to improve the well-being of the students both at home and in their various schools. View Full-Text
Keywords: Rwanda; sanitation; hygiene; education; assessment; waterborne diseases Rwanda; sanitation; hygiene; education; assessment; waterborne diseases
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Mourad, K.A.; Habumugisha, V.; Sule, B.F. Assessing Students’ Knowledge on WASH-Related Diseases. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16, 2052.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop