Next Article in Journal
Local Challenges and Successes Associated with Transitioning to Sustainable Food System Practices for a West Australian Context: Multi-Sector Stakeholder Perceptions
Next Article in Special Issue
Why Do Farmers Grow Tobacco? A Qualitative Exploration of Farmers Perspectives in Indonesia and Philippines
Previous Article in Journal
Disparities in Height and Urban Social Stratification in the First Half of the 20th Century in Madrid (Spain)
Previous Article in Special Issue
Illicit Cigarette Consumption and Government Revenue Loss in Vietnam: Evidence from a Primary Data Approach
Open AccessArticle

Integrating Smoking Cessation Care into a Medically Supervised Injecting Facility Using an Organizational Change Intervention: A Qualitative Study of Staff and Client Views

1
School of Medicine and Public Health, The University of Newcastle, Faculty of Health and Medicine, 1 University Drive, Callaghan, NSW 2308, Australia
2
Hunter New England Local Health District, Hunter New England Population Health, Booth Building, Longworth Avenue, Wallsend, NSW 2287, Australia
3
National Drug and Alcohol Research Centre, The University of New South Wales, 22-32 King Street, Randwick, NSW 2031, Australia
4
Uniting, Sydney Medically Supervised Injecting Centre, 66 Darlinghurst Road, Kings Cross, NSW 2011, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(11), 2050; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16112050
Received: 19 May 2019 / Revised: 2 June 2019 / Accepted: 6 June 2019 / Published: 10 June 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Tobacco Control: Policy Perspectives)
Background: Clients accessing supervised injecting facilities (SIFs) smoke at high rates. An SIF piloted an organizational change intervention to integrate smoking cessation care as routine treatment. This study aims to explore staff acceptability, perceived facilitators, and perceived barriers to implementing six core components of an organizational change intervention to integrate smoking cessation care in an SIF. Staff and client views on the acceptability, facilitators, and barriers to the provision of smoking cessation care were also examined. Methods: This paper presents findings from the qualitative component conducted post-intervention implementation. Face-to-face semi-structured staff interviews (n = 14) and two client focus groups (n = 5 and n = 4) were conducted between September and October 2016. Recruitment continued until data saturation was reached. Thematic analysis was employed to synthesise and combine respondent views and identify key themes. Results: Staff viewed the organizational change intervention as acceptable. Commitment from leadership, a designated champion, access to resources, and the congruence between the change and the facility’s ethos were important facilitators of organizational change. Less engaged staff was the sole barrier to the intervention. Smoking cessation care was deemed suitable. Key facilitators of smoking cessation care included: Written protocols, ongoing training, and visually engaging information. Key barriers of smoking cessation care included: Lack of access to nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) outside of business hours, practical limitations of the database, and concerns about sustainability of NRT. Conclusion: This study develops our understanding of factors influencing the implementation of an organisational change intervention to promote sustainable provision of smoking cessation care in the SIF setting. View Full-Text
Keywords: organizational change; tobacco smoking; facilitators; barriers; persons who inject drugs; supervised injecting facility; smoking cessation; acceptability organizational change; tobacco smoking; facilitators; barriers; persons who inject drugs; supervised injecting facility; smoking cessation; acceptability
MDPI and ACS Style

Skelton, E.; Tzelepis, F.; Shakeshaft, A.; Guillaumier, A.; Wood, W.; Jauncey, M.; Salmon, A.M.; McCrabb, S.; Bonevski, B. Integrating Smoking Cessation Care into a Medically Supervised Injecting Facility Using an Organizational Change Intervention: A Qualitative Study of Staff and Client Views. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16, 2050.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map

1
Back to TopTop