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Article

Parent’s Cardiorespiratory Fitness, Body Mass, and Chronic Disease Status Is Associated with Metabolic Syndrome in Young Adults: A Preliminary Study

1
Exercise Science, College of Nursing and Health Science, Flinders University, Adelaide 5001, Australia
2
Exercise and Sport Science, School of Health Sciences, University of South Australia, Adelaide 5001, Australia
3
Department of Exercise Sciences, Faculty of Science, The University of Auckland, Auckland 1023, New Zealand
4
Recreational, Exercise, and Sport Science Department, Western Colorado University, Gunnison, CO 81231, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(10), 1768; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16101768
Received: 15 April 2019 / Revised: 13 May 2019 / Accepted: 16 May 2019 / Published: 19 May 2019
(This article belongs to the Collection Health Behaviors, Risk Factors, NCDs and Health Promotion)
We sought to determine if there was an intergenerational association between parental weight, cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF), and disease status, with the prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MetSyn) in their young adult offspring. Young adults (n = 270, 21 ± 1 years, 53.3% female) were assessed for MetSyn and self-reported parent’s CRF, body mass status, and disease status. MetSyn was present in 11.9% of participants, 27.4% had one or two components, and 58.5% had no components. A significantly higher percentage (93.9%) of young adults with MetSyn identified at least one parent as being overweight or obese, 84.8% reported low parental CRF and 87.9% reported a parent with disease (all p < 0.017). MetSyn in offspring is more likely when parents are perceived to have low CRF, increased body mass, and a diagnosis of disease. Evaluating the offspring of people with low CRF, elevated body mass, or who have a history of cardiovascular disease (CVD) or diabetes should be considered to promote early identification and treatment of young adults to reduce future premature CVD in these at-risk individuals. View Full-Text
Keywords: metabolic syndrome; young adult; primordial prevention; primary prevention; cardiovascular disease screening metabolic syndrome; young adult; primordial prevention; primary prevention; cardiovascular disease screening
MDPI and ACS Style

Nolan, P.B.; Carrick-Ranson, G.; Stinear, J.W.; Reading, S.A.; Dalleck, L.C. Parent’s Cardiorespiratory Fitness, Body Mass, and Chronic Disease Status Is Associated with Metabolic Syndrome in Young Adults: A Preliminary Study. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16, 1768. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16101768

AMA Style

Nolan PB, Carrick-Ranson G, Stinear JW, Reading SA, Dalleck LC. Parent’s Cardiorespiratory Fitness, Body Mass, and Chronic Disease Status Is Associated with Metabolic Syndrome in Young Adults: A Preliminary Study. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2019; 16(10):1768. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16101768

Chicago/Turabian Style

Nolan, Paul B., Graeme Carrick-Ranson, James W. Stinear, Stacey A. Reading, and Lance C. Dalleck. 2019. "Parent’s Cardiorespiratory Fitness, Body Mass, and Chronic Disease Status Is Associated with Metabolic Syndrome in Young Adults: A Preliminary Study" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 16, no. 10: 1768. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16101768

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