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Open AccessArticle

National Evaluation of Canadian Multi-Service FASD Prevention Programs: Interim Findings from the Co-Creating Evidence Study

1
Principal, Nota Bene Consulting Group, Victoria, BC V8R1P8, Canada
2
School of Social Work, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC V8W2Y2, Canada
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(10), 1767; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16101767
Received: 6 April 2019 / Revised: 10 May 2019 / Accepted: 15 May 2019 / Published: 18 May 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD))
Since the 1990s, a number of multi-service prevention programs working with women who have substance use, mental health, or trauma and/or related social determinants of health issues have emerged in Canada. These programs use harm reduction approaches and provide outreach and “one-stop” health and social services on-site or through a network of services. While some of these programs have been evaluated, others have not, or their evaluations have not been published. This article presents interim qualitative findings of the Co-Creating Evidence project, a multi-year (2017–2020) national evaluation of holistic programs serving women at high risk of having an infant with prenatal alcohol exposure. The evaluation utilizes a mixed-methods design involving semi-structured interviews, questionnaires, focus groups, and client intake/outcome “snapshot” data. Findings demonstrated that the programs are reaching vulnerable pregnant/parenting women who face a host of complex circumstances including substance use, violence, child welfare involvement, and inadequate housing; moreover, it is typically the intersection of these issues that prompts women to engage with programs. Aligning with these results, key themes in what clients liked best about their program were: staff and their non-judgmental approach; peer support and sense of community; and having multiple services in one location, including help with mandated child protection. View Full-Text
Keywords: FASD; FASD prevention; program evaluation; multi-service delivery; integrated programs; multi-site evaluation FASD; FASD prevention; program evaluation; multi-service delivery; integrated programs; multi-site evaluation
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Rutman, D.; Hubberstey, C. National Evaluation of Canadian Multi-Service FASD Prevention Programs: Interim Findings from the Co-Creating Evidence Study. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16, 1767.

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