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Open AccessArticle

Development of iGrow: A Curriculum for Youth/Adult Dyads to Increase Gardening Skills, Culinary Competence, and Family Meal Time for Youths and Their Adult Caregivers

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Human Nutrition and Foods, Division of Animal and Nutritional Sciences, Davis College of Agriculture, Natural Resources & Design, West Virginia University, G027 Agricultural Science Building, Morgantown, WV 26506, USA
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Division of Plant and Soil Sciences, Davis College of Agriculture, Natural Resources & Design, West Virginia University, Horticulture, 3315 Agricultural Science Building, Morgantown, WV 26506, USA
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Department of Child Development, College of Education and Human Services, West Virginia University, 709B Allen Hall, Morgantown, WV 26506, USA
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School of Food and Agriculture, University of Maine, 5735 Hitchner Hall, Orono, ME 04469, USA
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Department of Nutrition, University of Tennessee, 1215 W. Cumberland Avenue, 229 Jessie Harris Building, Knoxville, TN 37996-1920, USA
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Nutrition and Health Sciences Department, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, 110 Ruth Leverton Hall, Lincoln, NE 68583-0806, USA
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Department of Health and Nutritional Sciences, South Dakota State University, Box 2275A, SWG 425, Brookings, SD 57007, USA
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(7), 1401; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15071401
Received: 15 May 2018 / Revised: 18 June 2018 / Accepted: 26 June 2018 / Published: 3 July 2018
(This article belongs to the Section Health Behavior, Chronic Disease and Health Promotion)
This manuscript describes the development of a “learn by actively participating” curriculum for youth and their adult caregivers (dyad pair) to increase gardening skills, culinary competence, and family meal time. The curriculum was developed by integrating “iCook 4-H” and Junior Masters Gardener “Health and Nutrition from the Garden”, and “Essential Elements of 4-H Youth Development” curriculums with additional resources for gardening activities from the USDA’s My Plate and garden-based recipes. Expert reviewers (n = 11) provided feedback on the curriculum content, session structure, dosage, age appropriateness, and balance of the three focused areas. Seven family dyads (n = 14) participated in focus groups about understanding of need, interest, barriers, and potential engagement. A 10-week curriculum was developed and named: iGrow. The curriculum is a hands on, active learning program delivered through five, two-hour sessions using a family dyad model. Three main focus areas included gardening, culinary skills, and family conversation/interaction that all focused on togetherness. For the final iGrow curriculum, expert-level content review and feedback from focus group dyad pairs was used to revise the curriculum which further enhanced the approach and balance of the curriculum content. Focus group feedback supported appropriateness, dosage and learning objectives, and content depth. This curriculum has been developed to provide knowledge of gardening and culinary skills with the goal of increased consumption of fruit and vegetables. View Full-Text
Keywords: curriculum; gardening; nutrition; education; fruit and vegetable; youth curriculum; gardening; nutrition; education; fruit and vegetable; youth
MDPI and ACS Style

White, J.A.; Hagedorn, R.L.; Waterland, N.L.; Barr, M.L.; Famodu, O.A.; Root, A.E.; White, A.A.; Colby, S.E.; Franzen-Castle, L.; Kattelmann, K.K.; Olfert, M.D. Development of iGrow: A Curriculum for Youth/Adult Dyads to Increase Gardening Skills, Culinary Competence, and Family Meal Time for Youths and Their Adult Caregivers. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15, 1401.

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