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Do Young People Ever Sit Still? Variations in Accelerometer Counts, Muscle Activity and Heart Rate across Various Sedentary Activities in Youth
Open AccessCommunication

From Evidence-Based Research to Practice-Based Evidence: Disseminating a Web-Based Computer-Tailored Workplace Sitting Intervention through a Health Promotion Organisation

1
Department of Movement and Sports Sciences, Ghent University, 9000 Ghent, Belgium
2
Institute of Resilient Regions, University of Southern Queensland, Springfield Central, QLD 4300, Australia
3
School of Health and Wellbeing, University of Southern Queensland, Ipswich, QLD 4305, Australia
4
Flemish Institute Healthy Living, 1020 Brussels, Belgium
5
Physical Activity Research Group, Appleton Institute, Central Queensland University, Rockhampton, QLD 4702, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(5), 1049; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15051049
Received: 10 April 2018 / Revised: 17 May 2018 / Accepted: 18 May 2018 / Published: 22 May 2018
(This article belongs to the Collection Sedentary Behaviour and Health)
Prolonged sitting has been linked to adverse health outcomes; therefore, we developed and examined a web-based, computer-tailored workplace sitting intervention. As we had previously shown good effectiveness, the next stage was to conduct a dissemination study. This study reports on the dissemination efforts of a health promotion organisation, associated costs, reach achieved, and attributes of the website users. The organisation systematically registered all the time and resources invested to promote the intervention. Website usage statistics (reach) and descriptive statistics (website users’ attributes) were also assessed. Online strategies (promotion on their homepage; sending e-mails, newsletters, Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn posts to professional partners) were the main dissemination methods. The total time investment was 25.6 h, which cost approximately 845 EUR in salaries. After sixteen months, 1599 adults had visited the website and 1500 (93.8%) completed the survey to receive personalized sitting advice. This sample was 38.3 ± 11.0 years, mainly female (76.9%), college/university educated (89.0%), highly sedentary (88.5% sat >8 h/day) and intending to change (93.0%) their sitting. Given the small time and money investment, these outcomes are positive and indicate the potential for wide-scale dissemination. However, more efforts are needed to reach men, non-college/university educated employees, and those not intending behavioural change. View Full-Text
Keywords: sedentary behaviour; sitting time; worksite; computer-tailoring; employees; e-health; public health practice; dissemination; translation; implementation; RE-AIM sedentary behaviour; sitting time; worksite; computer-tailoring; employees; e-health; public health practice; dissemination; translation; implementation; RE-AIM
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Cocker, K.D.; Cardon, G.; Bennie, J.A.; Kolbe-Alexander, T.; Meester, F.D.; Vandelanotte, C. From Evidence-Based Research to Practice-Based Evidence: Disseminating a Web-Based Computer-Tailored Workplace Sitting Intervention through a Health Promotion Organisation. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15, 1049.

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