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Development, Implementation and Evaluation of an Educational Intervention to Prevent Low Speed Vehicle Run-Over Events: Lessons Learned

1
Centre for Children’s Burns and Trauma Research, Lady Cilento Children’s Hospital, South Brisbane, QLD 4101, Australia
2
School of Nursing, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, QLD 4059, Australia
3
School of Public Health, Tropical Medicine and Rehabilitation Sciences, James Cook University, Townsville, QLD 4810, Australia
4
Faculty of Medicine, University of Queensland, Australia, Herston, QLD 4006, Australia
5
School of Rural Health, Charles Sturt University, Bathurst, NSW 2795, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(4), 685; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15040685
Received: 9 March 2018 / Revised: 1 April 2018 / Accepted: 3 April 2018 / Published: 5 April 2018
There is a growing body of literature regarding low speed vehicle runover (LSVRO) events among children. To date, no literature exists on evaluation of interventions to address this serious childhood injury. Knowledge, attitudes, and behaviour regarding LSVROs were assessed via survey at a shopping centre (pre-intervention), then five months later (post-intervention), to investigate the effect of a population level educational intervention in Queensland, Australia. Participants’ knowledge regarding frequency of LSVRO events was poor. No participant demonstrated ‘adequate behaviour’ in relation to four safe driveway behaviours pre-intervention; this increased at post-intervention (p < 0.05). Most of the sample perceived other’s driveway behaviour as inadequate, and this reduced significantly (<0.05). Perceived effectiveness of LSVRO prevention strategies increased from pre- to post-intervention, but not significantly. TV was the greatest source of knowledge regarding LSVROs pre- and post-intervention. This study provides some evidence that the educational campaign and opportunistic media engagement were successful in increasing awareness and improving behaviour regarding LSVROs. While there are several limitations to this study, our experience reflects the ‘real-world’ challenges associated with implementing prevention strategies. We suggest a multi-faceted approach involving media (including social media), legislative changes, subsidies (for reversing cameras), and education to prevent LSVROs. View Full-Text
Keywords: low speed vehicle runover (LSVRO); child; adolescent; educational intervention; injury prevention and control; transport low speed vehicle runover (LSVRO); child; adolescent; educational intervention; injury prevention and control; transport
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Griffin, B.; Watt, K.; Kimble, R.; Shields, L. Development, Implementation and Evaluation of an Educational Intervention to Prevent Low Speed Vehicle Run-Over Events: Lessons Learned. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15, 685.

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