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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(12), 2738; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15122738

A Lot of People Are Struggling Privately. They Don’t Know Where to Go or They’re Not Sure of What to Do”: Frontline Service Provider Perspectives of the Nature of Household Food Insecurity in Scotland

1
School of Nursing and Midwifery, Robert Gordon University, Aberdeen AB10 7QG, Scotland
2
Institute of Applied Health Sciences, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen AB25 2ZD, Scotland
3
Health Economics Research Unit, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen AB25 2ZD, Scotland
4
The Rowett Institute, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen AB25 2ZD, Scotland
5
Human Nutrition, School of Medicine, Dentistry and Nursing, College of Medical, Veterinary and Life Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G31 2ER, Scotland
6
Emeritus Professor of Food & Social Policy, Department Sociology, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 28 September 2018 / Revised: 28 November 2018 / Accepted: 30 November 2018 / Published: 4 December 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Addressing Food and Nutrition Security in Developed Countries)
Full-Text   |   PDF [392 KB, uploaded 13 December 2018]

Abstract

This qualitative study explored frontline service providers’ perceptions of the nature of food insecurity in Scotland in 2015 to inform national policy and the provision of locally-based support for ‘at risk’ groups. A country-wide in-depth interview study was undertaken with informants from 25 health, social care, and third sector organisations. The study investigated informants’ perspectives associated with how food insecurity was manifesting itself locally, and what was happening at the local level in response to the existence of food insecurity. Data analysis revealed three key themes. First, the multiple faces and factors of food insecurity involving not only increased concern for previously recognised ‘at risk of food insecurity’ groups, but also similar concern held about newly food insecure groups including working families, young people and women. Secondly, respondents witnessed stoicism and struggle, but also resistance amongst some food insecure individuals to external offers of help. The final theme identified community participation yet pessimism associated with addressing current and future needs of food insecure groups. These findings have important implications for the design and delivery of health and social policy in Scotland and other countries facing similar challenges. View Full-Text
Keywords: household food insecurity; food poverty; Scotland; low income; families; children; women; older people; qualitative household food insecurity; food poverty; Scotland; low income; families; children; women; older people; qualitative
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).
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Douglas, F.; MacKenzie, F.; Ejebu, O.-Z.; Whybrow, S.; Garcia, A.L.; McKenzie, L.; Ludbrook, A.; Dowler, E. “A Lot of People Are Struggling Privately. They Don’t Know Where to Go or They’re Not Sure of What to Do”: Frontline Service Provider Perspectives of the Nature of Household Food Insecurity in Scotland. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15, 2738.

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