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Open AccessArticle

Cycle Tracks and Parking Environments in China: Learning from College Students at Peking University

by 1,2,3,†, 3,4,†, 3,* and 1,*
1
Department of Nutrition, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA 02115, USA
2
Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA 02115, USA
3
Department of Epidemiology & Biostatistics, Peking University School of Public Health, Beijing 100191, China
4
Department of Epidemiology, College of Public Health, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242, USA
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Co-first authors.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14(8), 930; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph14080930
Received: 13 June 2017 / Revised: 7 August 2017 / Accepted: 14 August 2017 / Published: 18 August 2017
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Transportation and Health)
China has a historic system of wide cycle tracks, many of which are now encroached by cars, buses and bus stops. Even with these conditions, college students still bicycle. On campuses, students park their bikes on facilities ranging from kick-stand-plazas to caged sheds with racks, pumps and an attendant. In other countries, including Canada, some of the newer cycle tracks need to be wider to accommodate an increasing number of bicyclists. Other countries will also need to improve their bike parking, which includes garage-basement cages and two-tiered racks. China could provide lessons about cycle tracks and bike parking. This study applied the Maslow Transportation Level of Service (LOS) theory, i.e., for cycle tracks and bike parking, only after the basic needs of safety and security are met for both vehicle occupants and bicyclists can the higher needs of convenience and comfort be met. With random clustering, a self-administered questionnaire was collected from 410 students in six dormitory buildings at Peking University in Beijing and an environmental scan of bicycle parking conducted in school/office and living areas. Cycle tracks (1 = very safe/5 = very unsafe) shared with moving cars were most unsafe (mean = 4.6), followed by sharing with parked cars (4.1) or bus stop users (4.1) (p < 0.001). Close to half thought campus bike parking lacked order. The most suggested parking facilities were sheds, security (guard or camera), bicycle racks and bicycle parking services (pumps, etc.). If parking were improved, three quarters indicated they would bicycle more. While caged sheds were preferred, in living areas with 1597 parked bikes, caged sheds were only 74.4% occupied. For the future of China’s wide cycle tracks, perhaps a fence-separated bus lane beside a cycle track might be considered or, with China’s recent increase in bike riding, shared bikes and E-bikes, perhaps cars/buses could be banned from the wide cycle tracks. In other countries, a widened cycle track entrance should deter cars. Everywhere, bike parking sheds could be built and redesigned with painted lines to offer more space and order, similar to car parking. View Full-Text
Keywords: perceived safety; bicycle route; cycle track; bicycle parking perceived safety; bicycle route; cycle track; bicycle parking
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MDPI and ACS Style

Yuan, C.; Sun, Y.; Lv, J.; Lusk, A.C. Cycle Tracks and Parking Environments in China: Learning from College Students at Peking University. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14, 930. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph14080930

AMA Style

Yuan C, Sun Y, Lv J, Lusk AC. Cycle Tracks and Parking Environments in China: Learning from College Students at Peking University. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2017; 14(8):930. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph14080930

Chicago/Turabian Style

Yuan, Changzheng; Sun, Yangbo; Lv, Jun; Lusk, Anne C. 2017. "Cycle Tracks and Parking Environments in China: Learning from College Students at Peking University" Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 14, no. 8: 930. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph14080930

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