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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14(7), 800; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph14070800

Management Effectiveness of a Secondary Coniferous Forest for Landscape Appreciation and Psychological Restoration

1
Division of Forest Management, Forestry and Forest Products Research Institute in JAPAN, 1 Matsuno-sato, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8687, Japan
2
Fuji Iyashinomoroi Woodland Study Center, the University of Tokyo, 341-2 Yamanaka, Yamanakako Village, Minami-tsuru, Yamanashi 401-0501, Japan
3
Division of Human Environmental Science, Mt. Fuji Research Institute, 5597-1 Kami-yoshida, Fuji-yoshida, Yamanashi 403-0005, Japan
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Paul B. Tchounwou
Received: 22 May 2017 / Revised: 30 June 2017 / Accepted: 4 July 2017 / Published: 18 July 2017
(This article belongs to the Section Environmental Health)
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Abstract

We investigated the influence of forest management on landscape appreciation and psychological restoration in on-site settings by exposing respondents to an unmanaged, dense coniferous (crowding) forest and a managed (thinned) coniferous forest; we set the two experimental settings in the forests of the Fuji Iyashinomoroi Woodland Study Center. The respondents were individually exposed to both settings while sitting for 15 min and were required to answer three questionnaires to analyze the psychological restorative effects before and after the experiment (feeling (the Profile of Mood States), affect (the Positive and Negative Affect Schedule), and subjective restorativeness (the Restorative Outcome Scale). To compare landscape appreciation, they were required to answer another two questionnaires only after the experiment, for scene appreciation (the semantic differential scale) and for the restorative properties of each environment (the Perceived Restorativeness Scale). Finally, we obtained these findings: (1) the respondents evaluated each forest environment highly differently and evaluated the thinned forest setting more positively; (2) the respondents’ impressions of the two physical environments did not appear to be accurately reflected in their evaluations; (3) forest environments have potential restorative effects whether or not they are managed, but these effects can be partially enhanced by managing the forests. View Full-Text
Keywords: Shinrin-yoku; forest management; profile of mood states; restorative outcome scale; positive and negative affect schedule; semantic differential method; perceived restorativeness scale Shinrin-yoku; forest management; profile of mood states; restorative outcome scale; positive and negative affect schedule; semantic differential method; perceived restorativeness scale
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Takayama, N.; Fujiwara, A.; Saito, H.; Horiuchi, M. Management Effectiveness of a Secondary Coniferous Forest for Landscape Appreciation and Psychological Restoration. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14, 800.

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