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Article

E-Cigarettes for Immediate Smoking Substitution in Women Diagnosed with Cervical Dysplasia and Associated Disorders

1
Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, College of Public Health, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK 73104, USA
2
Department of Pediatrics, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK 73104, USA
3
Oklahoma University Physicians, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK 73104, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Paul B. Tchounwou
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2016, 13(3), 288; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph13030288
Received: 8 January 2016 / Revised: 25 February 2016 / Accepted: 29 February 2016 / Published: 4 March 2016
The aim of this study was to determine if 31 women with cervical dysplasia and associated conditions exacerbated by smoking would be successful substituting cigarettes with their choice of either nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) or electronic cigarettes (EC). Women received motivational interviewing and tried both NRT and ECs, choosing one method to use during a six-week intervention period. Daily cigarette consumption was measured at baseline, six, and 12 weeks, with differences analyzed by the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Study analysis consisted only of women choosing to use ECs (29/31), as only two chose NRT. At the 12-week follow-up, the seven day point prevalence abstinence from smoking was 28.6%, and the median number of cigarettes smoked daily decreased from 18.5 to 5.5 (p < 0.0001). The median number of e-cigarette cartridges used dropped from 21 at the six-week follow-up to 12.5 at the 12-week follow-up. After initiating EC use, women at risk for cervical cancer were able to either quit smoking or reduce the number of cigarettes smoked per day. Although a controlled trial with a larger sample size is needed to confirm these initial results, this study suggests that using ECs during quit attempts may reduce cigarette consumption. View Full-Text
Keywords: smoking cessation; cervical dysplasia; electronic cigarette; EC; electronic nicotine delivery device; vaping smoking cessation; cervical dysplasia; electronic cigarette; EC; electronic nicotine delivery device; vaping
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MDPI and ACS Style

James, S.A.; Meier, E.M.; Wagener, T.L.; Smith, K.M.; Neas, B.R.; Beebe, L.A. E-Cigarettes for Immediate Smoking Substitution in Women Diagnosed with Cervical Dysplasia and Associated Disorders. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2016, 13, 288. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph13030288

AMA Style

James SA, Meier EM, Wagener TL, Smith KM, Neas BR, Beebe LA. E-Cigarettes for Immediate Smoking Substitution in Women Diagnosed with Cervical Dysplasia and Associated Disorders. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2016; 13(3):288. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph13030288

Chicago/Turabian Style

James, Shirley A., Ellen M. Meier, Theodore L. Wagener, Katherine M. Smith, Barbara R. Neas, and Laura A. Beebe. 2016. "E-Cigarettes for Immediate Smoking Substitution in Women Diagnosed with Cervical Dysplasia and Associated Disorders" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 13, no. 3: 288. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph13030288

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