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Article

Brachialis Pulse Wave Measurements with Ultra-Wide Band and Continuous Wave Radar, Photoplethysmography and Ultrasonic Doppler Sensors

1
Technische Hochschule Lübeck, University of Applied Sciences, 23562 Lübeck, Germany
2
Institute of Biomedical Engineering, University of Lübeck, 23562 Lübeck, Germany
3
Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, University Medical Center Schleswig-Holstein, 23538 Lübeck, Germany
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Sensors 2021, 21(1), 165; https://doi.org/10.3390/s21010165
Received: 9 September 2020 / Revised: 22 December 2020 / Accepted: 23 December 2020 / Published: 29 December 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ultra Wideband (UWB) Systems in Biomedical Sensing)
The measurement and analysis of the arterial pulse wave provides information about the state of vascular health. When measuring blood pressure according to Riva-Rocci, the systolic and diastolic blood pressure is measured non-invasively with an inflatable pressure cuff on the upper arm. Today’s blood pressure monitors analyze the pulse wave in reference to the rising or falling cuff pressure. With the help of additional pulse wave analysis, one can determine the pulse rate and the heart rate variability. In this paper, we investigated the concept, the construction, and the limitations of ultrawideband (UWB) radar and continuous wave (CW) radar, which provide continuous and non-invasive pulse wave measurements. We integrated the sensors into a complete measurement system. We measured the pulse wave of the cuff pressure, the radar sensor (both UWB and CW), the optical sensor, and ultrasonic Doppler as a reference. We discussed the results and the sensor characteristics. The main conclusion was that the resolution of the pulse radar was too low, even with a maximum bandwidth of 10 GHz, to measure pulse waves reliably. The continuous wave radar provides promising results for a phantom if adjusted properly with phase shifts and frequency. In the future, we intend to develop a CW radar solution with frequency adaption. View Full-Text
Keywords: pulse wave measurement; blood pressure; ultra-wideband; biomedical sensing pulse wave measurement; blood pressure; ultra-wideband; biomedical sensing
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MDPI and ACS Style

Hellbrück, H.; Ardelt, G.; Wegerich, P.; Gehring, H. Brachialis Pulse Wave Measurements with Ultra-Wide Band and Continuous Wave Radar, Photoplethysmography and Ultrasonic Doppler Sensors. Sensors 2021, 21, 165. https://doi.org/10.3390/s21010165

AMA Style

Hellbrück H, Ardelt G, Wegerich P, Gehring H. Brachialis Pulse Wave Measurements with Ultra-Wide Band and Continuous Wave Radar, Photoplethysmography and Ultrasonic Doppler Sensors. Sensors. 2021; 21(1):165. https://doi.org/10.3390/s21010165

Chicago/Turabian Style

Hellbrück, Horst, Gunther Ardelt, Philipp Wegerich, and Hartmut Gehring. 2021. "Brachialis Pulse Wave Measurements with Ultra-Wide Band and Continuous Wave Radar, Photoplethysmography and Ultrasonic Doppler Sensors" Sensors 21, no. 1: 165. https://doi.org/10.3390/s21010165

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