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Article

Tacsac: A Wearable Haptic Device with Capacitive Touch-Sensing Capability for Tactile Display

1
Bendable Electronics and Sensing Technologies (BEST) Group, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ, UK
2
Department of Engineering, Nottingham Trent University, Clifton Campus, Nottingham NG11 8NS, UK
3
Biomedical Engineering, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8LP, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Sensors 2020, 20(17), 4780; https://doi.org/10.3390/s20174780
Received: 21 July 2020 / Revised: 18 August 2020 / Accepted: 21 August 2020 / Published: 24 August 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Tactile Sensors for Robotic Applications)
This paper presents a dual-function wearable device (Tacsac) with capacitive tactile sensing and integrated tactile feedback capability to enable communication among deafblind people. Tacsac has a skin contactor which enhances localized vibrotactile stimulation of the skin as a means of feedback to the user. It comprises two main modules—the touch-sensing module and the vibrotactile module; both stacked and integrated as a single device. The vibrotactile module is an electromagnetic actuator that employs a flexible coil and a permanent magnet assembled in soft poly (dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS), while the touch-sensing module is a planar capacitive metal-insulator-metal (MIM) structure. The flexible coil was fabricated on a 50 µm polyimide (PI) sheet using Lithographie Galvanoformung Abformung (LIGA) micromoulding technique. The Tacsac device has been tested for independent sensing and actuation as well as dual sensing-actuation mode. The measured vibration profiles of the actuator showed a synchronous response to external stimulus for a wide range of frequencies (10 Hz to 200 Hz) within the perceivable tactile frequency thresholds of the human hand. The resonance vibration frequency of the actuator is in the range of 60–70 Hz with an observed maximum off-plane displacement of 0.377 mm at coil current of 180 mA. The capacitive touch-sensitive layer was able to respond to touch with minimal noise both when actuator vibration is ON and OFF. A mobile application was also developed to demonstrate the application of Tacsac for communication between deafblind person wearing the device and a mobile phone user who is not deafblind. This advances existing tactile displays by providing efficient two-way communication through the use of a single device for both localized haptic feedback and touch-sensing. View Full-Text
Keywords: actuator; tactile sensor; deafblind communication; tactile display actuator; tactile sensor; deafblind communication; tactile display
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MDPI and ACS Style

Ozioko, O.; Navaraj, W.; Hersh, M.; Dahiya, R. Tacsac: A Wearable Haptic Device with Capacitive Touch-Sensing Capability for Tactile Display. Sensors 2020, 20, 4780. https://doi.org/10.3390/s20174780

AMA Style

Ozioko O, Navaraj W, Hersh M, Dahiya R. Tacsac: A Wearable Haptic Device with Capacitive Touch-Sensing Capability for Tactile Display. Sensors. 2020; 20(17):4780. https://doi.org/10.3390/s20174780

Chicago/Turabian Style

Ozioko, Oliver, William Navaraj, Marion Hersh, and Ravinder Dahiya. 2020. "Tacsac: A Wearable Haptic Device with Capacitive Touch-Sensing Capability for Tactile Display" Sensors 20, no. 17: 4780. https://doi.org/10.3390/s20174780

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