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Hyper-Spectral Imaging Technique in the Cultural Heritage Field: New Possible Scenarios
Open AccessArticle

The Quality Assessment of Different Geolocalisation Methods for a Sensor System to Monitor Structural Health of Monumental Objects

1
Faculty of Geodesy and Cartography, Warsaw University of Technology, Pl. Politechniki 1, 00-661 Warsaw, Poland
2
Built Environment and Sustainable Technologies (BEST) Research Institute, Faculty of Engineering and Technology, Liverpool John Moores University, Liverpool L3 3AF, UK
3
Documentation and Digitalization Department, Museum of King Jan III’s Palace at Wilanów, ul. Stanisława Kostki Potockiego 10/16, 02-958 Warsaw, Poland
4
Department of Material Culture History, University of Wrocław, Szewska 49, 50-137 Wroclaw, Poland
5
Collage of Engineering, University of Sharjah, Sharjah P.O. Box 27272, UAE
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Sensors 2020, 20(10), 2915; https://doi.org/10.3390/s20102915
Received: 2 April 2020 / Revised: 11 May 2020 / Accepted: 18 May 2020 / Published: 21 May 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sensors for Cultural Heritage Monitoring)
Cultural heritage objects are affected by a wide range of factors causing their deterioration and decay over time such as ground deformations, changes in hydrographic conditions, vibrations or excess of moisture, which can cause scratches and cracks formation in the case of historic buildings. The electromagnetic spectroscopy has been widely used for non-destructive structural health monitoring of concrete structures. However, the limitation of this technology is a lack of geolocalisation in the space for multispectral architectural documentation. The aim of this study is to examine different geolocalisation methods in order to determine the position of the sensor system, which will then allow to georeference the results of measurements performed by this device and apply corrections to the sensor response, which is a crucial element required for further data processing related to the object structure and its features. The classical surveying, terrestrial laser scanning (TLS), and Structure-from-Motion (SfM) photogrammetry methods were used in this investigation at three test sites. The methods were reviewed and investigated. The results indicated that TLS technique should be applied for simple structures and plain textures, while the SfM technique should be used for marble-based and other translucent or semi-translucent structures in order to achieve the highest accuracy for geolocalisation of the proposed sensor system. View Full-Text
Keywords: cultural heritage; electromagnetic sensor; geolocalisation; multisensor platform; non-destructive techniques; photogrammetry; Structure-from-Motion; structural health monitoring (SHM); surveying cultural heritage; electromagnetic sensor; geolocalisation; multisensor platform; non-destructive techniques; photogrammetry; Structure-from-Motion; structural health monitoring (SHM); surveying
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MDPI and ACS Style

Markiewicz, J.; Łapiński, S.; Kot, P.; Tobiasz, A.; Muradov, M.; Nikel, J.; Shaw, A.; Al-Shamma’a, A. The Quality Assessment of Different Geolocalisation Methods for a Sensor System to Monitor Structural Health of Monumental Objects. Sensors 2020, 20, 2915.

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