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Open AccessArticle

Correlation and Similarity between Cerebral and Non-Cerebral Electrical Activity for User’s States Assessment

1
Department of Molecular Medicine, Sapienza University of Rome, Piazzale Aldo Moro, 5, 00185 Rome, Italy
2
BrainSigns srl, via Sesto Celere, 00152 Rome, Italy
3
IRCCS Fondazione Santa Lucia, Neuroelectrical Imaging and BCI Lab, Via Ardeatina, 306, 00179 Rome, Italy
4
Department Anatomical, Histological, Forensic & Orthopedic Sciences, Sapienza University of Rome, Piazzale Aldo Moro, 5, 00185 Rome, Italy
5
College of Computer Science and Technology, Hangzhou Dianzi University, Hangzhou 310018, China
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Sensors 2019, 19(3), 704; https://doi.org/10.3390/s19030704
Received: 21 December 2018 / Revised: 30 January 2019 / Accepted: 7 February 2019 / Published: 9 February 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue EEG Electrodes)
Human tissues own conductive properties, and the electrical activity produced by human organs can propagate throughout the body due to neuro transmitters and electrolytes. Therefore, it might be reasonable to hypothesize correlations and similarities between electrical activities among different parts of the body. Since no works have been found in this direction, the proposed study aimed at overcoming this lack of evidence and seeking analogies between the brain activity and the electrical activity of non-cerebral locations, such as the neck and wrists, to determine if i) cerebral parameters can be estimated from non-cerebral sites, and if ii) non-cerebral sensors can replace cerebral sensors for the evaluation of the users under specific experimental conditions, such as eyes open or closed. In fact, the use of cerebral sensors requires high-qualified personnel, and reliable recording systems, which are still expensive. Therefore, the possibility to use cheaper and easy-to-use equipment to estimate cerebral parameters will allow making some brain-based applications less invasive and expensive, and easier to employ. The results demonstrated the occurrence of significant correlations and analogies between cerebral and non-cerebral electrical activity. Furthermore, the same discrimination and classification accuracy were found in using the cerebral or non-cerebral sites for the user’s status assessment. View Full-Text
Keywords: brain activity; EEG; human tissues conductibility; electrical activity; human body; machine-learning analysis; individual alpha frequency; correlation; biopotentials; mental states assessment brain activity; EEG; human tissues conductibility; electrical activity; human body; machine-learning analysis; individual alpha frequency; correlation; biopotentials; mental states assessment
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Borghini, G.; Aricò, P.; Di Flumeri, G.; Sciaraffa, N.; Babiloni, F. Correlation and Similarity between Cerebral and Non-Cerebral Electrical Activity for User’s States Assessment. Sensors 2019, 19, 704.

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