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Sensors 2019, 19(2), 362; https://doi.org/10.3390/s19020362

Air Quality Monitoring for Vulnerable Groups in Residential Environments Using a Multiple Hazard Gas Detector

1
Centre for Health Technologies, School of Biomedical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology, University of Technology Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2007, Australia
2
School of Electrical and Data Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology, University of Technology Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2007, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 16 October 2018 / Revised: 7 January 2019 / Accepted: 12 January 2019 / Published: 17 January 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Computational Intelligence-Based Sensors)
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Abstract

This paper presents a smart “e-nose” device to monitor indoor hazardous air. Indoor hazardous odor is a threat for seniors, infants, children, pregnant women, disabled residents, and patients. To overcome the limitations of using existing non-intelligent, slow-responding, deficient gas sensors, we propose a novel artificial-intelligent-based multiple hazard gas detector (MHGD) system that is mounted on a motor vehicle-based robot which can be remotely controlled. First, we optimized the sensor array for the classification of three hazardous gases, including cigarette smoke, inflammable ethanol, and off-flavor from spoiled food, using an e-nose with a mixing chamber. The mixing chamber can prevent the impact of environmental changes. We compared the classification results of all combinations of sensors, and selected the one with the highest accuracy (98.88%) as the optimal sensor array for the MHGD. The optimal sensor array was then mounted on the MHGD to detect and classify the target gases without a mixing chamber but in a controlled environment. Finally, we tested the MHGD under these conditions, and achieved an acceptable accuracy (70.00%). View Full-Text
Keywords: electronic nose; environmental monitoring; remote sensing and control electronic nose; environmental monitoring; remote sensing and control
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Wu, Y.; Liu, T.; Ling, S.H.; Szymanski, J.; Zhang, W.; Su, S.W. Air Quality Monitoring for Vulnerable Groups in Residential Environments Using a Multiple Hazard Gas Detector. Sensors 2019, 19, 362.

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