Next Article in Journal
Conserved Mechanisms, Novel Anatomies: The Developmental Basis of Fin Evolution and the Origin of Limbs
Previous Article in Journal
Applying Population Viability Analysis to Inform Genetic Rescue That Preserves Locally Unique Genetic Variation in a Critically Endangered Mammal
Previous Article in Special Issue
Variation in Alpine Plant Diversity and Soil Temperatures in Two Mountain Landscapes of South Patagonia
Review

Why Is the Alpine Flora Comparatively Robust against Climatic Warming?

Department of Environmental Sciences, Botany, University of Basel, Schönbeinstrasse 6, 4056 Basel, Switzerland
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Manuela Winkler, Juan Lorite and Till Kleinebecker
Diversity 2021, 13(8), 383; https://doi.org/10.3390/d13080383
Received: 30 May 2021 / Revised: 8 August 2021 / Accepted: 13 August 2021 / Published: 16 August 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Diversity, Ecology and Conservation of Alpine Plants)
The alpine belt hosts the treeless vegetation above the high elevation climatic treeline. The way alpine plants manage to thrive in a climate that prevents tree growth is through small stature, apt seasonal development, and ‘managing’ the microclimate near the ground surface. Nested in a mosaic of micro-environmental conditions, these plants are in a unique position by a close-by neighborhood of strongly diverging microhabitats. The range of adjacent thermal niches that the alpine environment provides is exceeding the worst climate warming scenarios. The provided mountains are high and large enough, these are conditions that cause alpine plant species diversity to be robust against climatic change. However, the areal extent of certain habitat types will shrink as isotherms move upslope, with the potential areal loss by the advance of the treeline by far outranging the gain in new land by glacier retreat globally. View Full-Text
Keywords: biodiversity; high-elevation; mountains; phenology; snow; species distribution; treeline; topography; vegetation; warming biodiversity; high-elevation; mountains; phenology; snow; species distribution; treeline; topography; vegetation; warming
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Körner, C.; Hiltbrunner, E. Why Is the Alpine Flora Comparatively Robust against Climatic Warming? Diversity 2021, 13, 383. https://doi.org/10.3390/d13080383

AMA Style

Körner C, Hiltbrunner E. Why Is the Alpine Flora Comparatively Robust against Climatic Warming? Diversity. 2021; 13(8):383. https://doi.org/10.3390/d13080383

Chicago/Turabian Style

Körner, Christian, and Erika Hiltbrunner. 2021. "Why Is the Alpine Flora Comparatively Robust against Climatic Warming?" Diversity 13, no. 8: 383. https://doi.org/10.3390/d13080383

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop