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Article

Cardiolipin-Containing Lipid Membranes Attract the Bacterial Cell Division Protein DivIVA

1
Institute of Molecular Biology SAS, Dubravska Cesta 21, 845 51 Bratislava, Slovakia
2
Institute of Science and Technology Austria (IST Austria), Am Campus 1, 3400 Klosterneuburg, Austria
3
CEITEC and Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Kamenice 5, 625 00 Brno, Czech Republic
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Georg A. Sprenger
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2021, 22(15), 8350; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms22158350
Received: 2 July 2021 / Revised: 28 July 2021 / Accepted: 1 August 2021 / Published: 3 August 2021
(This article belongs to the Collection Feature Papers in Molecular Microbiology)
DivIVA is a protein initially identified as a spatial regulator of cell division in the model organism Bacillus subtilis, but its homologues are present in many other Gram-positive bacteria, including Clostridia species. Besides its role as topological regulator of the Min system during bacterial cell division, DivIVA is involved in chromosome segregation during sporulation, genetic competence, and cell wall synthesis. DivIVA localizes to regions of high membrane curvature, such as the cell poles and cell division site, where it recruits distinct binding partners. Previously, it was suggested that negative curvature sensing is the main mechanism by which DivIVA binds to these specific regions. Here, we show that Clostridioides difficile DivIVA binds preferably to membranes containing negatively charged phospholipids, especially cardiolipin. Strikingly, we observed that upon binding, DivIVA modifies the lipid distribution and induces changes to lipid bilayers containing cardiolipin. Our observations indicate that DivIVA might play a more complex and so far unknown active role during the formation of the cell division septal membrane. View Full-Text
Keywords: Clostridioides difficile; DivIVA; lipid membrane; cardiolipin; phosphatidylglycerol Clostridioides difficile; DivIVA; lipid membrane; cardiolipin; phosphatidylglycerol
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MDPI and ACS Style

Labajová, N.; Baranova, N.; Jurásek, M.; Vácha, R.; Loose, M.; Barák, I. Cardiolipin-Containing Lipid Membranes Attract the Bacterial Cell Division Protein DivIVA. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2021, 22, 8350. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms22158350

AMA Style

Labajová N, Baranova N, Jurásek M, Vácha R, Loose M, Barák I. Cardiolipin-Containing Lipid Membranes Attract the Bacterial Cell Division Protein DivIVA. International Journal of Molecular Sciences. 2021; 22(15):8350. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms22158350

Chicago/Turabian Style

Labajová, Naďa, Natalia Baranova, Miroslav Jurásek, Robert Vácha, Martin Loose, and Imrich Barák. 2021. "Cardiolipin-Containing Lipid Membranes Attract the Bacterial Cell Division Protein DivIVA" International Journal of Molecular Sciences 22, no. 15: 8350. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms22158350

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