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Article

Characterization of a Leptin Receptor Paralog and Its Response to Fasting in Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

National Center for Cool and Cold Water Aquaculture, Agricultural Research Service, United States Department of Agriculture, Kearneysville, WV 25430, USA
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Academic Editors: Isabel Navarro and Daniel Garcia de la Serrana
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2021, 22(14), 7732; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms22147732
Received: 21 June 2021 / Revised: 14 July 2021 / Accepted: 16 July 2021 / Published: 20 July 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Endocrine Control of Fish Metabolism)
Leptin is a cytokine that regulates appetite and energy expenditure, where in fishes it is primarily produced in the liver and acts to mobilize carbohydrates. Most fishes have only one leptin receptor (LepR/LepRA1), however, paralogs have recently been documented in a few species. Here we reveal a second leptin receptor (LepRA2) in rainbow trout that is 77% similar to trout LepRA1. Phylogenetic analyses show a salmonid specific genome duplication event as the probable origin of the second LepR in trout. Tissues distributions showed tissue specific expression of these receptors, with lepra1 highest in the ovaries, nearly 50-fold higher than lepra2. Interestingly, lepra2 was most highly expressed in the liver while hepatic lepra1 levels were low. Feed deprivation elicited a decline in plasma leptin, an increase in hepatic lepra2 by one week and remained elevated at two weeks, while liver expression of lepra1 remained low. By contrast, muscle lepra1 mRNA increased at one and two weeks of fasting, while adipose lepra1 was concordantly lower in fasted fish. lepra2 transcript levels were not affected in muscle and fat. These data show lepra1 and lepra2 are differentially expressed across tissues and during feed deprivation, suggesting paralog- and tissue-specific functions for these leptin receptors. View Full-Text
Keywords: leptin receptor; rainbow trout; duplicate; paralog; tissue distribution; fasting leptin receptor; rainbow trout; duplicate; paralog; tissue distribution; fasting
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MDPI and ACS Style

Mankiewicz, J.L.; Cleveland, B.M. Characterization of a Leptin Receptor Paralog and Its Response to Fasting in Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2021, 22, 7732. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms22147732

AMA Style

Mankiewicz JL, Cleveland BM. Characterization of a Leptin Receptor Paralog and Its Response to Fasting in Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). International Journal of Molecular Sciences. 2021; 22(14):7732. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms22147732

Chicago/Turabian Style

Mankiewicz, Jamie L., and Beth M. Cleveland. 2021. "Characterization of a Leptin Receptor Paralog and Its Response to Fasting in Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)" International Journal of Molecular Sciences 22, no. 14: 7732. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms22147732

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