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Article

The Transplantation Resistance of Type II Diabetes Mellitus Adipose-Derived Stem Cells Is Due to G6PC and IGF1 Genes Related to the FoxO Signaling Pathway

Division of Pharmaceutics, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Sanyo-Onoda City University, 1-1-1 Daigaku-Dori, Sanyo Onoda 756-0884, Japan
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Academic Editor: Prasanth Puthanveetil
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2021, 22(12), 6595; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms22126595
Received: 17 May 2021 / Revised: 17 June 2021 / Accepted: 17 June 2021 / Published: 19 June 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Metabolism Signaling and Gene Regulation in Human Health)
In cases of patients with rapidly progressive diabetes mellitus (DM), autologous stem cell transplantation is considered as one of the regenerative treatments. However, whether the effects of autonomous stem cell transplantation on DM patients are equivalent to transplantation of stem cells derived from healthy persons is unclear. This study revealed that adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ADSC) derived from type II DM patients had lower transplantation efficiency, proliferation potency, and stemness than those derived from healthy persons, leading to a tendency to induce apoptotic cell death. To address this issue, we conducted a cyclopedic mRNA analysis using a next-generation sequencer and identified G6PC3 and IGF1, genes related to the FoxO signaling pathway, as the genes responsible for lower performance. Moreover, it was demonstrated that the lower transplantation efficiency of ADSCs derived from type II DM patients might be improved by knocking down both G6PC3 and IGF1 genes. This study clarified the difference in transplantation efficiency between ADSCs derived from type II DM patients and those derived from healthy persons and the genes responsible for the lower performance of the former. These results can provide a new strategy for stabilizing the quality of stem cells and improving the therapeutic effects of regenerative treatments on autonomous stem cell transplantation in patients with DM. View Full-Text
Keywords: stem cell; adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ADSC); type II diabetes mellitus; transplant resistance; FoxO signaling pathway; G6PC3; IGF1 stem cell; adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ADSC); type II diabetes mellitus; transplant resistance; FoxO signaling pathway; G6PC3; IGF1
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MDPI and ACS Style

Horiguchi, M.; Turudome, Y.; Ushijima, K. The Transplantation Resistance of Type II Diabetes Mellitus Adipose-Derived Stem Cells Is Due to G6PC and IGF1 Genes Related to the FoxO Signaling Pathway. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2021, 22, 6595. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms22126595

AMA Style

Horiguchi M, Turudome Y, Ushijima K. The Transplantation Resistance of Type II Diabetes Mellitus Adipose-Derived Stem Cells Is Due to G6PC and IGF1 Genes Related to the FoxO Signaling Pathway. International Journal of Molecular Sciences. 2021; 22(12):6595. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms22126595

Chicago/Turabian Style

Horiguchi, Michiko, Yuya Turudome, and Kentaro Ushijima. 2021. "The Transplantation Resistance of Type II Diabetes Mellitus Adipose-Derived Stem Cells Is Due to G6PC and IGF1 Genes Related to the FoxO Signaling Pathway" International Journal of Molecular Sciences 22, no. 12: 6595. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms22126595

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