Next Article in Journal
Transcriptomic Analysis of Planarians under Simulated Microgravity or 8 g Demonstrates That Alteration of Gravity Induces Genomic and Cellular Alterations That Could Facilitate Tumoral Transformation
Next Article in Special Issue
Intravenous Immunoglobulin Therapy Eliminates Candida albicans and Maintains Intestinal Homeostasis in a Murine Model of Dextran Sulfate Sodium-Induced Colitis
Previous Article in Journal
Lipid–Protein Interactions in Niemann–Pick Type C Disease: Insights from Molecular Modeling
Previous Article in Special Issue
The Interplay between Immunity and Microbiota at Intestinal Immunological Niche: The Case of Cancer
Open AccessReview

Interactions between Host Immunity and Skin-Colonizing Staphylococci: No Two Siblings Are Alike

1
Graduate School of Medical Science and Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), Daejeon 34141, Korea
2
Biomedical Science and Engineering Interdisciplinary Program, KAIST, Daejeon 34141, Korea
3
KAIST Institute for Health Science and Technology, KAIST, Daejeon 34141, Korea
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2019, 20(3), 718; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms20030718
Received: 29 January 2019 / Accepted: 4 February 2019 / Published: 7 February 2019
As the outermost layer of the body, the skin harbors innumerable and varied microorganisms. These microorganisms interact with the host, and these interactions contribute to host immunity. One of the most abundant genera of skin commensals is Staphylococcus. Bacteria belonging to this genus are some of the most influential commensals that reside on the skin. For example, colonization by Staphylococcus aureus, a well-known pathogen, increases inflammatory responses within the skin. Conversely, colonization by Staphylococcus epidermis, a coagulase-negative staphylococcal species that are prevalent throughout the skin, can be innocuous or beneficial. Thus, manipulating the abundance of these two bacterial species likely alters the skin microbiome and modulates the cutaneous immune response, with potential implications for various inflammation-associated skin diseases. Importantly, before researchers can begin manipulating the skin microbiome to prevent and treat disease, they must first fully understand how these two species can modulate the cutaneous immune response. In this review, we discuss the nature of the interactions between these two bacterial species and immune cells within the skin, discussing their immunogenicity within the context of skin disorders. View Full-Text
Keywords: cutaneous immunity; microbiome; Staphylococcus spp., T cells; Staphylococcus aureus; Staphylococcus epidermis; commensals; atopic dermatitis cutaneous immunity; microbiome; Staphylococcus spp., T cells; Staphylococcus aureus; Staphylococcus epidermis; commensals; atopic dermatitis
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Park, Y.J.; Kim, C.W.; Lee, H.K. Interactions between Host Immunity and Skin-Colonizing Staphylococci: No Two Siblings Are Alike. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2019, 20, 718.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop