Next Article in Journal
PPP3CB Inhibits Migration of G401 Cells via Regulating Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition and Promotes G401 Cells Growth
Previous Article in Journal
Brain-Derived Neurotrophin and TrkB in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma
Previous Article in Special Issue
Speciation of Selenium in Brown Rice Fertilized with Selenite and Effects of Selenium Fertilization on Rice Proteins
Article Menu

Export Article

Open AccessReview
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2019, 20(2), 273; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms20020273

Iron as a Central Player and Promising Target in Cancer Progression

1
Institute of Biochemistry I, Faculty of Medicine, Goethe-University Frankfurt, Theodor-Stern-Kai 7, 60590 Frankfurt, Germany
2
Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Arizona, 1306 E. University Blvd., Tucson, AZ 85721-0041, USA
3
German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), Partner Site Frankfurt, Theodor-Stern-Kai 7, 60590 Frankfurt, Germany
4
Project Group Translational Medicine and Pharmacology TMP, Fraunhofer Institute for Molecular Biology and Applied Ecology, 60596 Frankfurt, Germany
These authors contributed equally to this work.
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 19 December 2018 / Revised: 8 January 2019 / Accepted: 9 January 2019 / Published: 11 January 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Metallomics: Integrated Biosciences for Elements)
Full-Text   |   PDF [629 KB, uploaded 11 January 2019]   |  

Abstract

Iron is an essential element for virtually all organisms. On the one hand, it facilitates cell proliferation and growth. On the other hand, iron may be detrimental due to its redox abilities, thereby contributing to free radical formation, which in turn may provoke oxidative stress and DNA damage. Iron also plays a crucial role in tumor progression and metastasis due to its major function in tumor cell survival and reprogramming of the tumor microenvironment. Therefore, pathways of iron acquisition, export, and storage are often perturbed in cancers, suggesting that targeting iron metabolic pathways might represent opportunities towards innovative approaches in cancer treatment. Recent evidence points to a crucial role of tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) as a source of iron within the tumor microenvironment, implying that specifically targeting the TAM iron pool might add to the efficacy of tumor therapy. Here, we provide a brief summary of tumor cell iron metabolism and updated molecular mechanisms that regulate cellular and systemic iron homeostasis with regard to the development of cancer. Since iron adds to shaping major hallmarks of cancer, we emphasize innovative therapeutic strategies to address the iron pool of tumor cells or cells of the tumor microenvironment for the treatment of cancer. View Full-Text
Keywords: iron homeostasis; lipocalin-2; macrophage polarization; tumor progression; iron chelators iron homeostasis; lipocalin-2; macrophage polarization; tumor progression; iron chelators
Figures

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).
SciFeed

Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Jung, M.; Mertens, C.; Tomat, E.; Brüne, B. Iron as a Central Player and Promising Target in Cancer Progression. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2019, 20, 273.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Int. J. Mol. Sci. EISSN 1422-0067 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top