Next Article in Journal
The Effect of GPRC5a on the Proliferation, Migration Ability, Chemotherapy Resistance, and Phosphorylation of GSK-3β in Pancreatic Cancer
Next Article in Special Issue
The Nefarious Nexus of Noncoding RNAs in Cancer
Previous Article in Journal
PPARs and Energy Metabolism Adaptation during Neurogenesis and Neuronal Maturation
Previous Article in Special Issue
Role of MicroRNAs in Renal Parenchymal Diseases—A New Dimension
Open AccessReview

Using microRNA Networks to Understand Cancer

1
Department of Experimental Therapeutics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Blvd. Unit 1950, Houston, TX 77030, USA
2
Department of Surgery, Fundeni Hospital, University of Medicine and Pharmacy Carol Davila, Sos. Fundeni nr. 258, Sector 2, 022328 Bucharest, Romania
3
Research Center for Functional Genomics, Biomedicine and Translational Medicine, University of Medicine and Pharmacy Iuliu Hatieganu, Str. Gh. Marinescu 23, 400012 Cluj-Napoca, Romania
4
Brazilian Biosciences National Laboratory (LNBio), Brazilian Center for Research in Energy and Materials (CNPEM), Rua Giuseppe Maximo Scolfaro 10000, Campinas, SP 13083-970, Brazil
5
Department of Genetics, Evolution and Bioagents, Institute of Biology, P.O. Box 6109, University of Campinas—UNICAMP, Campinas, SP 13083-970, Brazil
6
Center for RNA Inference and Non-Coding RNAs, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Blvd. Unit 1950, Houston, TX 77030, USA
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
These authors have contributed equally to this work.
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2018, 19(7), 1871; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms19071871
Received: 8 June 2018 / Revised: 18 June 2018 / Accepted: 22 June 2018 / Published: 26 June 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Role of MicroRNAs in Human Diseases)
Human cancers are characterized by deregulated expression of multiple microRNAs (miRNAs), involved in essential pathways that confer the malignant cells their tumorigenic potential. Each miRNA can regulate hundreds of messenger RNAs (mRNAs), while various miRNAs can control the same mRNA. Additionally, many miRNAs regulate and are regulated by other species of non-coding RNAs, such as circular RNAs (circRNAs) and long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs). For this reason, it is extremely difficult to predict, study, and analyze the precise role of a single miRNA involved in human cancer, considering the complexity of its connections. Focusing on a single miRNA molecule represents a limited approach. Additional information could come from network analysis, which has become a common tool in the biological field to better understand molecular interactions. In this review, we focus on the main types of networks (monopartite, association networks and bipartite) used for analyzing biological data related to miRNA function. We briefly present the important steps to take when generating networks, illustrating the theory with published examples and with future perspectives of how this approach can help to better select miRNAs that can be therapeutically targeted in cancer. View Full-Text
Keywords: microRNAs; gene regulatory networks; neoplasms; molecular targeted therapy microRNAs; gene regulatory networks; neoplasms; molecular targeted therapy
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

MDPI and ACS Style

Dragomir, M.; Mafra, A.C.P.; Dias, S.M.G.; Vasilescu, C.; Calin, G.A. Using microRNA Networks to Understand Cancer. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2018, 19, 1871.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop