Next Article in Journal
Pharmacokinetic Comparison of Epinastine Using Developed Human Plasma Assays
Next Article in Special Issue
A Preliminary Study on Metabolome Profiles of Buffalo Milk and Corresponding Mozzarella Cheese: Safeguarding the Authenticity and Traceability of Protected Status Buffalo Dairy Products
Previous Article in Journal
Isoflavones Isolated from the Seeds of Millettia ferruginea Induced Apoptotic Cell Death in Human Ovarian Cancer Cells
Previous Article in Special Issue
The Ancient Neapolitan Sweet Lime and the Calabrian Lemoncetta Locrese Belong to the Same Citrus Species
Open AccessArticle

The Trichoderma atroviride Strains P1 and IMI 206040 Differ in Their Light-Response and VOC Production

1
Department of Microbiology, University of Innsbruck, 6020 Innsbruck, Austria
2
Breath Research Institute, University of Innsbruck, 6850 Dornbirn, Austria
3
Umweltmonitoring und Forensische Chemie, Hochschule Hamm-Lippstadt, 59063 Hamm, Germany
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Derek J. McPhee
Molecules 2020, 25(1), 208; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules25010208
Received: 9 December 2019 / Revised: 21 December 2019 / Accepted: 27 December 2019 / Published: 3 January 2020
Trichoderma atroviride is a strong necrotrophic mycoparasite antagonizing and feeding on a broad range of fungal phytopathogens. It further beneficially acts on plants by enhancing growth in root and shoot and inducing systemic resistance. Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are playing a major role in all those processes. Light is an important modulator of secondary metabolite biosynthesis, but its influence has often been neglected in research on fungal volatiles. To date, T. atroviride IMI 206040 and T. atroviride P1 are among the most frequently studied T. atroviride strains and hence are used as model organisms to study mycoparasitism and photoconidiation. However, there are no studies available, which systematically and comparatively analyzed putative differences between these strains regarding their light-dependent behavior and VOC biosynthesis. We therefore explored the influence of light on conidiation and the mycoparasitic interaction as well as the light-dependent production of VOCs in both strains. Our data show that in contrast to T. atroviride IMI 206040 conidiation in strain P1 is independent of light. Furthermore, significant strain- and light-dependent differences in the production of several VOCs between the two strains became evident, indicating that T. atroviride P1 could be a better candidate for plant protection than IMI 206040. View Full-Text
Keywords: Trichoderma atroviride; mycoparasitism; secondary metabolites; volatile organic compounds (VOCs); photoconidiation; fungi; 2-octanone; injury response; light response; Fusarium oxysporum Trichoderma atroviride; mycoparasitism; secondary metabolites; volatile organic compounds (VOCs); photoconidiation; fungi; 2-octanone; injury response; light response; Fusarium oxysporum
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Speckbacher, V.; Ruzsanyi, V.; Wigger, M.; Zeilinger, S. The Trichoderma atroviride Strains P1 and IMI 206040 Differ in Their Light-Response and VOC Production. Molecules 2020, 25, 208.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop