Topic Editors

Petroleum Engineering Discipline, WA School of Mines: Minerals, Energy and Chemical Engineering, Curtin University, Perth, WA 6102, Australia
Dr. Hisham Khaled Ben Mahmud
Department of Petroleum Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, 32610 Seri Iskandar, Perak Darul Ridzuan, Malaysia
Department of Petroleum Engineering , Khalifa University of Science and Technology, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates

Drilling, Completion and Well Engineering for the Natural Energy Resources Extraction, Storage and Sustainable Management, 2nd Volume

Abstract submission deadline
20 March 2025
Manuscript submission deadline
20 May 2025
Viewed by
2691

Topic Information

Dear Colleagues,

The key to successfully meeting the growing global energy demand and achieving energy transition in sustainable, environmentally, and socially acceptable manner, lies in the processes of drilling and well completion. These processes are integral to various aspects, including oil and gas exploration and extraction, geothermal energy harnessing, gas hydrate exploration, deep mining, subsea mining, and underground storage of CO2, hydrogen, and excess renewable energy in the form of compressed air. While drilling and well completion technologies have rapidly advanced, particularly in the realm of oil and gas exploration and production, their progress in other domains such as underground hydrogen storage, geothermal energy, deep mining, and storing excess renewable energy as compressed air has been very limited. These technological advancements also, must not only deliver cost-effective and safe well construction and completion throughout a well's lifecycle but also ensure sustainable development that addresses economic, health, safety, and environmental (HSE) concerns and societal challenges.

With this perspective in mind, we are pleased to reintroduce the previously successful topic, “Drilling, Completion and Well Engineering for the Energy Resources Extraction, Storage and Sustainable Technology” within the purview of esteemed journals like Energies, Geosciences, Minerals, and Resources. We also welcome contributions related to CO2 Capture, Storage, Utilization, and Sequestration (CCUS) and Natural Resource Extraction, Natural Hydrogen Exploration and Production, Underground Hydrogen Storage.

This topic aims to encompass multidisciplinary scholarly works that delve deeply into the scientific principles and mechanisms, addressing critical economic, social, and technical challenges, and exploring innovative ideas and concepts in the broader context of Drilling, Completion, and Well Engineering for Natural Energy Resource Extraction, Storage, and Sustainable Development and Management.

Topics of interest for publication in this topic include but are not limited to:

  • Drilling and completion engineering.
  • Drilling Automation, artificial intelligence, machine learning within the scope of drilling, completion, well engineering deployment, along with advancements in fibre optics and sensor technology, and the concept of smart well completion.
  • Drilling and completion fluids including phenomena related to multiphase fluid flow and developments in drilling fluid and cementing technology.
  • Geomechanics, and earth modelling, wellbore stability; Borehole Integrity
  • Material engineering, encompassing composite materials and sustainable material solutions.
  • Utilising computational fluid dynamics and advanced numerical techniques, as well as advanced optimisation techniques for the analysis, prediction, interpretation, characterisation, and optimization of drilling, completion and operation processes
  • Coil tubing drilling and completion;
  • HSE (Health, Safety, and Environment) and sustainability aspects associated with drilling, completion, maintenance, and operations.
  • Well integrity, and development of regularity framework and compliance throughout drilling, completion, and injection, operations.
  • Decommission, Repurposing of existing wells, and plug and abandonment (P&A) procedures
  • Process safety during drilling, including well control and considerations related to human elements.
  • Advanced drilling technologies.

Dr. Mofazzal Hossain
Dr. Hisham Khaled Ben Mahmud
Dr. Md Motiur Rahman
Topic Editors

Keywords

  • drilling
  • completion
  • materials
  • drilling fluids
  • cementing
  • multiphase flow
  • drilling hydraulics
  • drilling automation
  • materials
  • composite materials
  • sustainable materials
  • sustainable energy development
  • coil tubing, drilling bit technology
  • automation, AI and ML in drilling and completion
  • drilling and completion operations
  • drilling and completion information management

Participating Journals

Journal Name Impact Factor CiteScore Launched Year First Decision (median) APC
Energies
energies
3.2 6.2 2008 16.1 Days CHF 2600 Submit
Geosciences
geosciences
2.7 5.3 2011 23.6 Days CHF 1800 Submit
Minerals
minerals
2.5 4.1 2011 18.7 Days CHF 2400 Submit
Resources
resources
3.3 7.2 2012 23.8 Days CHF 1600 Submit

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Published Papers (2 papers)

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12 pages, 5470 KiB  
Article
Experimental Study of Energy Design Optimization for Underwater Electrical Shockwave for Fracturing Applications
by Mohamed M. Awad, Ibrahim Eltaleb and Mohamed Y. Soliman
Geosciences 2024, 14(1), 24; https://doi.org/10.3390/geosciences14010024 - 17 Jan 2024
Viewed by 1387
Abstract
Underwater electrical shockwave can be used as a waterless, chemical-free, and environmentally friendly fracturing technique. A detailed experimental study was performed to develop a correlation between the optimum energy required to generate a shockwave that could be used in fracturing rock samples with [...] Read more.
Underwater electrical shockwave can be used as a waterless, chemical-free, and environmentally friendly fracturing technique. A detailed experimental study was performed to develop a correlation between the optimum energy required to generate a shockwave that could be used in fracturing rock samples with the wire weight and diameter as independent factors. In addition, the effect of the water volume on the Underwater Electrical Wire Explosion (UEWE) was investigated to quantify the effect of the wellbore fluid volume in the fracturing process. The effect of increasing the discharge energy on the current waveform rising rate, peak amplitude, and fracturing geometry was investigated. A baseline for implementing the shockwave fracturing method on cement and limestone samples was defined to be used in future work. The results show that the water volume has a significant effect on the results of the experiment. A correlation was developed that defined the optimum minimum energy required to burn a certain wire weight with consideration to the wire diameter. Using the optimum required energy or higher will increases the current peak amplitude with the same current waveform rise rate, which leads to higher energy deposition into the wire and prevents the premature breakdown of the wire. The generated shockwave was used to successfully fracture cement and limestone cubic samples. Full article
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17 pages, 8718 KiB  
Article
Hydraulic Radial Drilling Using a Rotary Hydraulic Nozzle Aimed at Increasing the Exploitation of Deposits
by Przemyslaw Toczek, Rafal Wisniowski, Albert Zlotkowski and Wojciech Teper
Energies 2023, 16(23), 7867; https://doi.org/10.3390/en16237867 - 1 Dec 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 813
Abstract
The exploration and development of new hydrocarbon deposits face increasing challenges, primarily driven by the shift away from hydrocarbons towards renewable energy sources like shallow geothermal deposits, wind farms, and photovoltaics. This shift necessitates finding solutions that minimize environmental impact and enable increased [...] Read more.
The exploration and development of new hydrocarbon deposits face increasing challenges, primarily driven by the shift away from hydrocarbons towards renewable energy sources like shallow geothermal deposits, wind farms, and photovoltaics. This shift necessitates finding solutions that minimize environmental impact and enable increased energy extraction from existing or decommissioned fields and wells. This paper explores the possibility of excavating from potentially depleted fields, where a significant portion (up to 85%) of the reservoir’s resources remain unrecoverable due to low reservoir energy. To address this, secondary and tertiary exploitation methods are proposed involving the supply of external energy to increase the pressure in the reservoir layer, thereby enhancing resource exploitation. One of the suggested tertiary methods involves reaming the deposit with multiple small-diameter radial holes using a hydraulic drilling nozzle. The entire process comprises several key components, including the coiled tubing unit (CTU), high-pressure flexible hose, window drilling kit for casing pipe, kit for positioning the exit of the hydraulic drilling head from the casing pipe, anchor, and hydraulic drilling head attached to the end of the high-pressure flexible hose. This method aims to increase the contact between the reservoir layer and the wellbore, potentially leading to an increase in or initiation of exploitation in certain deposit scenarios. The described method presents an environmentally friendly approach, eliminating the need for drilling new boreholes and offering cost-effective access to resources in decommissioned deposits with insufficient reservoir energy for self-exploitation. The applicability of this method to extract methane from coalbed seams is also mentioned in this article. In a separate article, the authors detail the design of a hydraulic drilling nozzle specifically for reaming the reservoir layer. Full article
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