Topic Editors

Department of Life Sciences, MARE – Marine and Environmental Sciences Centre / ARNET - Aquatic Research Network, University of Coimbra, Calçada Martim de Freitas, 3000-456 Coimbra, Portugal
Prof. Dr. Tiago Verdelhos
CIVG—Vasco da Gama Research Center, EUVG—Vasco da Gama University School, Coimbra, Portugal

Climate Change and Aquatic Ecosystems: Impacts, Mitigation and Adaptation

Abstract submission deadline
20 June 2024
Manuscript submission deadline
20 September 2024
Viewed by
2492

Topic Information

Dear Colleagues,

The United Nations' 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development calls for concerted efforts to enhance knowledge of the state of oceans, seas, and marine resources. Over the last few decades, climate change has posed significant challenges to natural environments and society, with particularly detrimental impacts on aquatic ecosystems. Further detrimental impacts are expected under the ongoing context of global warming, including phenomena such as sea level rise, extreme events, and ocean acidification. These changes lead to alterations in marine and freshwater ecosystems, causing habitat loss and disruption of biodiversity and functioning, putting them at risk. Concerns exist regarding the current and projected adverse effects of climate change on these environments, and urgent action is needed to address this problem. Increased understanding and immediate action are essential to reduce vulnerability and increase the resilience of these ecosystems. This requires the development and implementation of coordinated mitigation and adaptation measures to promote their sustainability and environmental health in general. This topic will focus on the impacts and effects of climate change on aquatic ecosystems, as well as propose and outline strategies for mitigation and adaptation. We welcome the submission of high-quality manuscripts that present original research ideas or results, as well as comprehensive reviews offering novel perspectives.

Dr. Helena Veríssimo
Prof. Dr. Tiago Verdelhos
Topic Editors

Keywords

  • climate change
  • climate policies and laws
  • tools for environmental assessment and management
  • sustainability tools and sustainable development
  • environmental health
  • aquatic ecosystems
  • ecosystem services

Participating Journals

Journal Name Impact Factor CiteScore Launched Year First Decision (median) APC
Applied Sciences
applsci
2.7 4.5 2011 16.9 Days CHF 2400 Submit
Climate
climate
3.7 5.2 2013 19.7 Days CHF 1800 Submit
Ecologies
ecologies
- - 2020 19.8 Days CHF 1000 Submit
Journal of Marine Science and Engineering
jmse
2.9 3.7 2013 15.4 Days CHF 2600 Submit
Water
water
3.4 5.5 2009 16.5 Days CHF 2600 Submit

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Published Papers (4 papers)

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22 pages, 2878 KiB  
Review
Evolution and Effectiveness of Salt Marsh Restoration: A Bibliometric Analysis
by Carlos Gonçalves, João Fernandes, João M. Neto, Helena Veríssimo, Isabel Caçador and Tiago Verdelhos
Water 2024, 16(8), 1175; https://doi.org/10.3390/w16081175 (registering DOI) - 20 Apr 2024
Viewed by 200
Abstract
Salt marshes play a critical role in supporting water quality, erosion control, flood protection, and carbon sequestration. Threats from climate change and human activities have prompted global restoration initiatives. We analyzed restoration efforts worldwide from 1978 to 2022, using the Web of Science [...] Read more.
Salt marshes play a critical role in supporting water quality, erosion control, flood protection, and carbon sequestration. Threats from climate change and human activities have prompted global restoration initiatives. We analyzed restoration efforts worldwide from 1978 to 2022, using the Web of Science database and SciMAT mapping tool. After a PRISMA screening to identify methodologies, success rates, and key indicators, a total of 62 publications underwent detailed analysis, to increase knowledge on the best practices to employ in future restoration interventions and evaluation of their effectiveness. The research reveals a growing interest in ecosystem dynamics, biodiversity, anthropogenic impacts, and ecosystem services. Assisted interventions emerged as the predominant restoration method, employing 15 indicators across vegetation, sediment, fauna, and water, each one using different metrics for the intervention evaluation based on how good the outcome of the interventions described in the reviewed studies met the desired result. Our analysis suggests that combining natural interventions such as managed realignment with reconnection to tidal waters, along with long-term monitoring of vegetation, fauna, and water indicators such as sedimentation and erosion rates, plant cover and biomass, as well as fauna diversity and density, leads to the most successful outcomes. We provide valuable insights into best practices for future restoration interventions, offering guidance to future practitioners and policymakers based on a comprehensive review of the scientific literature, contributing to the resilience of these vital ecosystems, and ensuring effective restoration actions in the coming years. Full article
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15 pages, 1786 KiB  
Article
Implications of Climate-Induced Localised Extinction of Bull Kelp (Durvillaea amatheiae) for Holdfast Macrofauna
by Tom R. Davis, Matt J. Nimbs, Andrew Benson and Steve D. A. Smith
Ecologies 2024, 5(2), 218-232; https://doi.org/10.3390/ecologies5020014 - 14 Apr 2024
Viewed by 330
Abstract
Globally, work is being undertaken to preserve biodiversity and prevent further species extinctions. Yet, without adequate data about the presence of species within ecosystems, hidden extinctions can occur without our knowledge. Given that poleward range retractions are projected for bull kelp (Durvillaea [...] Read more.
Globally, work is being undertaken to preserve biodiversity and prevent further species extinctions. Yet, without adequate data about the presence of species within ecosystems, hidden extinctions can occur without our knowledge. Given that poleward range retractions are projected for bull kelp (Durvillaea amatheiae) in southeastern Australia, there is the potential for hidden extinctions to occur in associated macrofaunal species. However, this risk cannot be assessed due to the limited data on the invertebrate macrofauna associated with D. amatheiae. We documented macrofauna within D. amatheiae holdfasts, with the objective of establishing a first analysis of the holdfast fauna for this kelp and identifying, where possible, any host-specific taxa. Holdfasts were collected at six locations, spanning most of the range of D. amatheiae on the southeastern Australian mainland. Macrofauna were removed from holdfasts and identified to the lowest possible taxonomic level. Modelling was applied to determine factors correlated with patterns of assemblages among locations. Holdfast assemblages were found to vary significantly among locations and exhibited a latitudinal gradient in assemblage structure. The northernmost location (Aragunnu), which has the highest risk of D. amatheiae range retractions, was found to have distinct species assemblages and generally higher diversity and abundance than locations further south. However, no host-specific taxa were identified in samples, indicating that there is a low risk of multiple hidden species extinctions occurring in holdfast macrofauna, due to future range retractions of D. amatheiae. Rather, most of the macrofauna taxa in D. amatheiae holdfasts were found to also occur in association with the sympatric golden kelp Ecklonia radiata, which is not expected to undergo range retractions at the latitudes where losses of D. amatheiae are projected. Overall, there is an urgent need to develop strategies to combat projected future range retractions of D. amatheiae to reduce impacts on the species that rely on D. amatheiae for habitat. Full article
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14 pages, 3956 KiB  
Review
A Comprehensive Review of Climatic Threats and Adaptation of Marine Biodiversity
by Kaitano Dube
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2024, 12(2), 344; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse12020344 - 17 Feb 2024
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 928
Abstract
Oceans play a vital role in socioeconomic and environmental development by supporting activities such as tourism, recreation, and food provision while providing important ecosystem services. However, concerns have been raised about the threat that climate change poses to the functions of oceans. This [...] Read more.
Oceans play a vital role in socioeconomic and environmental development by supporting activities such as tourism, recreation, and food provision while providing important ecosystem services. However, concerns have been raised about the threat that climate change poses to the functions of oceans. This study examines the impacts, threats, and adaptation strategies of climate change and marine biodiversity. Using bibliometric and secondary data analysis, this study determines that climate change leads to rising sea temperatures, marine heatwaves, acidification, and increasing sea levels. These factors undermine the significance of ocean ecosystem services. This study also identifies the significant risks posed by climate change to marine species diversity and distribution, primarily through habitat degradation and shifts in species ranges. Scholarly focus on these challenges has grown over time, focusing on adaptation strategies and building resilience to mitigate adverse impacts. This study critically evaluates various adaptation measures, including nature-based and human-based solutions such as habitat restoration, policy and legislative frameworks, and their potential to protect marine ecosystems. It provides detailed discussions on the effectiveness of adaptation strategies such as marine protected areas (MPAs), mangrove and coral reef restoration, and species range shifts. This review also emphasises the significance of indigenous knowledge systems and community participation in marine conservation efforts to achieve holistic and sustainable management. It highlights the need for enhanced international cooperation and a transdisciplinary approach to address the complex interplay between climate change and marine biodiversity. Additionally, this study suggests that funding for research gaps and conservation can be secured through tourism revenue and other climate funding mechanisms. Full article
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18 pages, 5620 KiB  
Article
Diurnal Variations and Driving Factors of CO2 Flux at Water–Air Interfaces in the Open-Flow Sections of Karst Underground Rivers
by Danyang Li, Canfeng Li, Chao Huang, Hong Li, Xiongwei Xu, Xuefeng Peng, Guiren Chen and Liankai Zhang
Appl. Sci. 2024, 14(4), 1395; https://doi.org/10.3390/app14041395 - 08 Feb 2024
Viewed by 627
Abstract
The high-intensity partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2) in karst underground rivers rapidly releases in open-flow sections. This is an important process affecting the global karst carbon cycle. This study focuses on the diurnal variation patterns and driving factors [...] Read more.
The high-intensity partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2) in karst underground rivers rapidly releases in open-flow sections. This is an important process affecting the global karst carbon cycle. This study focuses on the diurnal variation patterns and driving factors of CO2 exchange flux at the water–air interface in the open-flow sections of typical karst underground rivers in southwestern China. The inorganic carbon in water and water–air interface exchange fluxes are observed. Three representative survey stations, i.e., the outlet of the underground river (Q1), the river sections without submerged plants (H1), and the river sections with submerged plants (H2), are selected to study the CO2 exchange process and its influencing factors. The results show that the CO2 release flux at Q1 exhibits high pressure in the daytime and low pressure in the nighttime, while H1 and H2 exhibit the opposite pattern. The photosynthesis of submerged plants significantly inhibits the carbon release flux of the river, and in the river sections where submerged plants are distributed, their biological effects have inhibited approximately 0.131 Tg C/yr of carbon emissions. This study emphasizes the significant contribution of submerged plants in restraining the release of CO2, thereby promoting carbon sequestration and storage in karst water systems. Full article
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