Topic Editors

Centre for Functional Ecology, Department of Life Sciences, University of Coimbra, 3000-456 Coimbra, Portugal
Prof. Dr. Christopher Rensing
College of Resources and Environment, Fujian Agriculture and Forestry University, Fuzhou 350002, China

Microbe-Induced Abiotic Stress Alleviation in Plants

Abstract submission deadline
30 July 2024
Manuscript submission deadline
30 September 2024
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2246

Topic Information

Dear Colleagues,

We are pleased to extend this special invitation for contributions to a forthcoming multidisciplinary topic on "Microbe-Induced Abiotic Stress Alleviation in Plants". This multidisciplinary topic aims to compile cutting-edge research and perspectives on the pivotal role of microbes in enhancing plant resilience to various abiotic stressors.

Abiotic stresses such as drought, salinity, extreme temperatures, and heavy metal contamination continue to pose formidable challenges to global agriculture and food security. However, recent advancements in microbiology have shed light on the remarkable capacity of certain microorganisms to mitigate the adverse effects of these stresses on plant growth and productivity.

We invite original research articles, reviews, and perspectives that explore the diverse mechanisms underlying microbe-induced abiotic stress alleviation in plants. Topics of interest include but are not limited to:

  1. Elucidation of molecular and physiological mechanisms involved in plant-microbe interactions under stress conditions
  2. Engineering microbial consortia for enhanced stress tolerance in crops
  3. Application of microbe-based biostimulants and biofertilizers in sustainable agriculture
  4. Metagenomic and metatranscriptomic approaches to unravel the microbial contributions to plant stress resilience
  5. Field trials and practical applications of microbial interventions for stress management in agricultural systems

We encourage submissions that present novel insights, experimental findings, methodological advances, and interdisciplinary perspectives. Manuscripts will undergo rigorous peer review to ensure the publication of high-quality research.

Contributions to this multidisciplinary topic will provide valuable insights into harnessing the potential of microbial-mediated strategies for sustainable agriculture and crop improvement in the face of escalating environmental challenges.

We look forward to your participation in this exciting endeavor.

Prof. Dr. Ying Ma
Prof. Dr. Christopher Rensing
Topic Editors

Keywords

  • plant–microbe–soil interaction
  • abiotic stresses
  • plant-growth-promoting microorganisms
  • plant mineral nutrition
  • plant production systems

Participating Journals

Journal Name Impact Factor CiteScore Launched Year First Decision (median) APC
Agriculture
agriculture
3.6 4.9 2011 17.7 Days CHF 2600 Submit
Agronomy
agronomy
3.7 6.2 2011 15.8 Days CHF 2600 Submit
Crops
crops
- - 2021 30.5 Days CHF 1000 Submit
Microorganisms
microorganisms
4.5 7.4 2013 15.1 Days CHF 2700 Submit
Plants
plants
4.5 6.5 2012 15.3 Days CHF 2700 Submit
International Journal of Plant Biology
ijpb
- 2.0 2010 14.4 Days CHF 1200 Submit
Soil Systems
soilsystems
3.5 5.3 2017 27.7 Days CHF 1800 Submit

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Published Papers (3 papers)

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17 pages, 3305 KiB  
Article
Antagonism and Synergism Characterize the Interactions between Four North American Potato Virus Y Strains
by Prakash M. Niraula, Patricia Baldrich, Junaid A. Cheema, Hashir A. Cheema, Dejah S. Gaiter, Blake C. Meyers and Vincent N. Fondong
Int. J. Plant Biol. 2024, 15(2), 412-428; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijpb15020032 - 21 May 2024
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Abstract
Potato virus Y (PVY) is one of the most important constraints to potato production worldwide. There is an increasing occurrence of recombinant PVY strains PVYNTN and PVYN-Wi and a decline in the incidence of the nonrecombinant PVYO. We hypothesized [...] Read more.
Potato virus Y (PVY) is one of the most important constraints to potato production worldwide. There is an increasing occurrence of recombinant PVY strains PVYNTN and PVYN-Wi and a decline in the incidence of the nonrecombinant PVYO. We hypothesized that this may be due to the ability of these recombinant strains to antagonize and/or outcompete PVYO in mixed infections. To determine this, we investigated interactions between PVYO and three recombinant PVY strains common in North America: PVYNTN, PVYN-Wi, and PVYN:O. Overall, our study showed that these interactions are tissue-dependent. Specifically, PVYNTN, the main causal agent of potato tuber necrotic ringspot disease (PTNRD), was found to be more adaptable than PVYO, especially in potato leaves due, at least in part, to the Ny gene that confers hypersensitive resistance (HR) to PVYO. Furthermore, PVYN-Wi was found to repress PVYO in potato tubers but act synergistically in potato leaves. The PVYO-induced foliage necrosis in cultivar ‘Ranger Russet’ was observed to be more severe in plants co-infected by PVYN-Wi and PVYN:O, respectively, resulting in plant death. Strikingly, this PVYO -induced necrosis was suppressed by PVYNTN in doubly infected plants. These interactions may, at least partially, explain the decreasing incidence of PVYO in United States potato production regions, especially given that many cultivars contain the Ny gene, which likely limits PVYO enabling PVYNTN and PVYN-Wi to outcompete. We also found that replication and cell-to-cell movement of these PVY strains in tubers at 4 °C was similar to levels at ambient temperature. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Microbe-Induced Abiotic Stress Alleviation in Plants)
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14 pages, 2908 KiB  
Article
The Impact of Aboveground Epichloë Endophytic Fungi on the Rhizosphere Microbial Functions of the Host Melica transsilvanica
by Chuanzhe Wang, Chong Shi, Wei Huang, Mengmeng Zhang and Jiakun He
Microorganisms 2024, 12(5), 956; https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms12050956 - 8 May 2024
Viewed by 559
Abstract
In nature, the symbiotic relationship between plants and microorganisms is crucial for ecosystem balance and plant growth. This study investigates the impact of Epichloë endophytic fungi, which are exclusively present aboveground, on the rhizosphere microbial functions of the host Melica transsilvanica. Using [...] Read more.
In nature, the symbiotic relationship between plants and microorganisms is crucial for ecosystem balance and plant growth. This study investigates the impact of Epichloë endophytic fungi, which are exclusively present aboveground, on the rhizosphere microbial functions of the host Melica transsilvanica. Using metagenomic methods, we analyzed the differences in microbial functional groups and functional genes in the rhizosphere soil between symbiotic (EI) and non-symbiotic (EF) plants. The results reveal that the presence of Epichloë altered the community structure of carbon and nitrogen cycling-related microbial populations in the host’s rhizosphere, significantly increasing the abundance of the genes (porA, porG, IDH1) involved in the rTCA cycle of the carbon fixation pathway, as well as the abundance of nxrAB genes related to nitrification in the nitrogen-cycling pathway. Furthermore, the presence of Epichloë reduces the enrichment of virulence factors in the host rhizosphere microbiome, while significantly increasing the accumulation of resistance genes against heavy metals such as Zn, Sb, and Pb. This study provides new insights into the interactions among endophytic fungi, host plants, and rhizosphere microorganisms, and offers potential applications for utilizing endophytic fungi resources to improve plant growth and soil health. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Microbe-Induced Abiotic Stress Alleviation in Plants)
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13 pages, 2521 KiB  
Article
Plant Growth-Promoting Bacteria Influence Microbial Community Composition and Metabolic Function to Enhance the Efficiency of Hybrid pennisetum Remediation in Cadmium-Contaminated Soil
by Zhao-Jin Chen, Meng-Lu Li, Shan-Shan Gao, Yu-Bo Sun, Hui Han, Bai-Lian Li and Yu-Ying Li
Microorganisms 2024, 12(5), 870; https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms12050870 - 26 Apr 2024
Viewed by 754
Abstract
The green and efficient remediation of soil cadmium (Cd) is an urgent task, and plant-microbial joint remediation has become a research hotspot due to its advantages. High-throughput sequencing and metabolomics have technical advantages in analyzing the microbiological mechanism of plant growth-promoting bacteria in [...] Read more.
The green and efficient remediation of soil cadmium (Cd) is an urgent task, and plant-microbial joint remediation has become a research hotspot due to its advantages. High-throughput sequencing and metabolomics have technical advantages in analyzing the microbiological mechanism of plant growth-promoting bacteria in improving phytoremediation of soil heavy metal pollution. In this experiment, a pot trial was conducted to investigate the effects of inoculating the plant growth-promoting bacterium Enterobacter sp. VY on the growth and Cd remediation efficiency of the energy plant Hybrid pennisetum. The test strain VY-1 was analyzed using high-throughput sequencing and metabolomics to assess its effects on microbial community composition and metabolic function. The results demonstrated that Enterobacter sp. VY-1 effectively mitigated Cd stress on Hybrid pennisetum, resulting in increased plant biomass, Cd accumulation, and translocation factor, thereby enhancing phytoremediation efficiency. Analysis of soil physical-chemical properties revealed that strain VY-1 could increase soil total nitrogen, total phosphorus, available phosphorus, and available potassium content. Principal coordinate analysis (PCoA) indicated that strain VY-1 significantly influenced bacterial community composition, with Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, Chloroflexi, among others, being the main differential taxa. Redundancy analysis (RDA) revealed that available phosphorus, available potassium, and pH were the primary factors affecting bacterial communities. Partial Least Squares Discriminant Analysis (PLS-DA) demonstrated that strain VY-1 modulated the metabolite profile of Hybrid pennisetum rhizosphere soil, with 27 differential metabolites showing significant differences, including 19 up-regulated and eight down-regulated expressions. These differentially expressed metabolites were primarily involved in metabolism and environmental information processing, encompassing pathways such as glutamine and glutamate metabolism, α-linolenic acid metabolism, pyrimidine metabolism, and purine metabolism. This study utilized 16S rRNA high-throughput sequencing and metabolomics technology to investigate the impact of the plant growth-promoting bacterium Enterobacter sp. VY-1 on the growth and Cd enrichment of Hybrid pennisetum, providing insights into the regulatory role of plant growth-promoting bacteria in microbial community structure and metabolic function, thereby improving the microbiological mechanisms of phytoremediation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Microbe-Induced Abiotic Stress Alleviation in Plants)
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