E-Mail Alert

Add your e-mail address to receive forthcoming issues of this journal:

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Special Issue "Dynamics of Water and Sediments and Their Implications for Integrated Watershed Management"

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Water Resources Management and Governance".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 May 2019).

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Yanpeng Cai

State Laboratory of Water Environment Simulation, School of Environment, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875, China.
Website | E-Mail
Guest Editor
Dr. Xizhi Lv

Yellow River Institute of Hydraulic Research
E-Mail

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In many large rivers across the world, high concentrations of sediments are of major concern to local decision makers. Such issues have strong environmental and ecological implications for governmental and research communities. For example, high-concentration sediments in natural water bodies may represent high vulnerability to soil erosion upstream of a specific river basin. Additionally, they may be multiplied by contaminants in the water and act as carriers of these contaminants in the water. Moreover, conditions of high-concentration sentiments may be further combined with many water-related problems, such as water resources shortage, water quality degradation, and flooding. Such combined effects may be further complicated by many changing conditions (e.g., climate change). This is leading to multiple levels of complexity for decision makers and water managers, posing potential threats to the sustainable development of river basins in many countries. Therefore, it is desired to understand and quantify the dynamics of water and sediments and their implications for integrated watershed management in rivers with high sediment concentration.

Recently, many research activities have been initiated for dealing with these issues, and a number of excellent papers have been generated related to the dynamics of water and sediments and their implications for integrated watershed management. Thus, we want to publish selected high-quality papers in a journal to broaden their impacts. These products represent an achievement in global water resources and hydrological science and pose a scientific basis for basin management, particularly those basins with high sediment concentration across the world, making it worthwhile to publish them in a high-quality international journal. Therefore, we would appreciate it if you would kindly consider us as editors of a Special Issue entitled “Dynamics of Water and Sediments and Their Implications for Integrated Watershed Management”). We would offer to do all reviewing and editing works, and will act as the key contacts. We believe that this Special Issue will provide a viable forum for sharing experiences and facilitating further discussions, in addition to helping promote research, development, and application in sediment simulation and management, water resources simulation and management, and decision making. It will also help demonstrate the leading role of the journal in relevant fields.

Potential contributors may include but are not limited to: authors of the relevant projects, workshops, symposiums, and conferences; researchers involved in climate change, hydrology, sediment simulation, water quality simulation, watershed modeling, and water resources projects; and other leading researchers in the related areas. At the same time, potential readers may include:

  • Researchers, scientists, engineers, and policy makers working in areas such as climate change, hydrology and water resources, and environmental science and engineering;
  • Researchers, scientists, engineers, and policy makers working in water/watershed systems modeling;
  • Researchers working in artificial intelligence and expert systems for climate change impact analysis and the associated implications in sediments, water resources, and watershed management;
  • Researchers working in mathematical models for water and sediment cycles;
  • Scientists, engineers and policy makers in hydrology, water and sediment systems;
  • Researchers working in computer applications for decision support of sustainable water resources management;
  • Researchers in climate change impact analysis, adaptation planning, and vulnerability analysis of large high-sediment river basins.

Prof. Dr. Yanpeng Cai
Dr. Xizhi Lv
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Water is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (4 papers)

View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-4
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle
Comparison of Acoustic to Optical Backscatter Continuous Measurements of Suspended Sediment Concentrations and Their Characterization in an Agriculturally Impacted River
Water 2019, 11(5), 981; https://doi.org/10.3390/w11050981
Received: 19 March 2019 / Revised: 18 April 2019 / Accepted: 8 May 2019 / Published: 10 May 2019
PDF Full-text (1880 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The increased soil loss in an agricultural watershed raises challengers for river water quality and a reliable automated monitoring for suspended sediment concentrations (SSC) is crucial to evaluate sediment budgets variation in systems. The aims of this study were (1) to test if [...] Read more.
The increased soil loss in an agricultural watershed raises challengers for river water quality and a reliable automated monitoring for suspended sediment concentrations (SSC) is crucial to evaluate sediment budgets variation in systems. The aims of this study were (1) to test if an acoustic doppler current profiler (ADCP) would give similar results to turbidity probe measurements as a high frequency monitoring tool for suspended sediment; and (2) to analyze the relationship between sediment drivers and SSC in a typical agricultural drainage basin. The acoustic and optical backscatter sensors were used to collect SSC data during the ice-free seasons of four consecutive years in the Dunk River (PEI, Canada). The slopes of the relationships between the two SSC indirect measurements were not significantly different than 1. Correlations between SSC and hydro-meteorological variables showed that the high SSC values were more associated with the streamflow and water velocity than precipitation. This study highlighted the great potential of ADCP for the continuous monitoring of suspended sediment in an agricultural watershed. For summer periods the prevalence of clockwise hysteresis (74.1% of measured rainstorm events with SSC > 25 mg L−1) appeared related to rainstorm behaviors. Full article
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Characteristics of Horizontal Precipitation in Semi-Humid Forestland in Northern China
Water 2019, 11(5), 975; https://doi.org/10.3390/w11050975
Received: 18 March 2019 / Revised: 29 April 2019 / Accepted: 6 May 2019 / Published: 9 May 2019
PDF Full-text (6399 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Little information is available on horizontal precipitation in forest land in semi-humid climate regions. In this study, the quantity and duration of horizontal precipitation were investigated using the high precision weighing lysimeter system in the mountainous areas of northern China during the experiment [...] Read more.
Little information is available on horizontal precipitation in forest land in semi-humid climate regions. In this study, the quantity and duration of horizontal precipitation were investigated using the high precision weighing lysimeter system in the mountainous areas of northern China during the experiment year 2011 and 2012. The purpose of this study was to better understand the formation mechanisms of horizontal precipitation in the semi-humid climate region. The results showed that hourly values of horizontal precipitation distributed between 0 and 0.1 mm, and that the one-night values distributed between 0.2 and 0.4 mm. The number of days with horizontal precipitation accounted for about 45% of the whole year. The average monthly amount of horizontal precipitation was 4.5 mm in the non-growing season, while it was a mere 1.6 mm in the growing season. The total amount of horizontal precipitation in the year was about 33 mm. Horizontal precipitation represented about 4.61% and 4.23% of the annual precipitation in 2011 and 2012. During the non-growing season, water vapor absorbed by the soil was greater than canopy and soil condensation, not only in terms of frequency, but also in the cumulated quantity. On a typical day, the canopy and soil condensation was 0.07 mm, accounting for 31.81% of total quantity of horizontal precipitation (0.22 mm). Air temperature, soil temperature and wind speed were negatively correlated with the quantity and duration of horizontal precipitation. This research could provide information for a better understanding of the ecological significance of horizontal precipitation in the semi-humid climate region in northern China. Full article
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Spatial Variabilities of Runoff Erosion and Different Underlying Surfaces in the Xihe River Basin
Water 2019, 11(2), 352; https://doi.org/10.3390/w11020352
Received: 14 December 2018 / Revised: 14 February 2019 / Accepted: 15 February 2019 / Published: 19 February 2019
PDF Full-text (3578 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Runoff erosion capacity has significant effects on the spatial distribution of soil erosion and soil losses. But few studies have been conducted to evaluate these effects in the Loess Plateau. In this study, an adjusted SWAT model was used to simulate the hydrological [...] Read more.
Runoff erosion capacity has significant effects on the spatial distribution of soil erosion and soil losses. But few studies have been conducted to evaluate these effects in the Loess Plateau. In this study, an adjusted SWAT model was used to simulate the hydrological process of the Xihe River basin from 1993 to 2012. The spatial variabilities between runoff erosion capacity and underlying surface factors were analyzed by combining spatial gradient analysis and GWR (Geographically Weighted Regression) analysis. The results show that the spatial distribution of runoff erosion capacity in the studying area has the following characteristics: strong in the north, weak in the south, strong in the west, and weak in the east. Topographic factors are the dominant factors of runoff erosion in the upper reaches of the basin. Runoff erosion capacity becomes stronger with the increase of altitude and gradient. In the middle reaches area, the land with low vegetation coverage, as well as arable land, show strong runoff erosion ability. In the downstream areas, the runoff erosion capacity is weak because of better underlying surface conditions. Compared with topographic and vegetation factors, soil factors have less impact on runoff erosion. The red clay and mountain soil in this region have stronger runoff erosion capacities compared with other types of soils, with average runoff modulus of 1.79 × 10−3 m3/s·km2 and 1.68 × 10−3 m3/s·km2, respectively, and runoff erosion power of 0.48 × 10−4 m4/s·km2 and 0.34 × 10−4 m4/s·km2, respectively. The runoff erosion capacity of the alluvial soil is weak, with an average runoff modulus of 0.96 × 10−3 m3/s·km2 and average erosion power of 0.198 × 10−4 m4/s·km2. This study illustrates the spatial distribution characteristics and influencing factors of hydraulic erosion in the Xihe River Basin from the perspective of energy. It contributes to the purposeful utilization of water and soil resources in the Xihe River Basin and provides a theoretical support for controlling the soil erosion in the Hilly-gully region of the Loess Plateau. Full article
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Dynamic Modeling of Sediment Budget in Shihmen Reservoir Watershed in Taiwan
Water 2018, 10(12), 1808; https://doi.org/10.3390/w10121808
Received: 13 November 2018 / Revised: 25 November 2018 / Accepted: 6 December 2018 / Published: 8 December 2018
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (16168 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Qualifying sediment dynamic in a reservoir watershed is essential for water resource management. This study proposed an integrated model of Grid-based Sediment Production and Transport Model (GSPTM) at watershed scale to evaluate the dynamic of sediment production and transport in the Shihmen Reservoir [...] Read more.
Qualifying sediment dynamic in a reservoir watershed is essential for water resource management. This study proposed an integrated model of Grid-based Sediment Production and Transport Model (GSPTM) at watershed scale to evaluate the dynamic of sediment production and transport in the Shihmen Reservoir watershed in Taiwan. The GSPTM integrates several models, revealing landslide susceptibility and processes of rainfall–runoff, sediment production from landslide and soil erosion, debris flow and mass movement, and sediment transport. For modeling rainfall–runoff process, the tanks model gives surface runoff volume and soil water index as a hydrological parameter for a logistic regression-based landslide susceptibility model. Then, applying landslide model with a scaling relation of volume and area predicts landslide occurrence. The Universal Soil Loss Equation is then used for calculating soil erosion volume. Finally, incorporating runoff-routing algorithm and the Hunt’s model achieves the dynamical modeling of sediment transport. The landslide module was calibrated using a well-documented inventory during 10 heavy rainfall or typhoon events since 2004. A simulation of Typhoon Morakot event was performed to evaluate model’s performance. The results show the simulation agrees with the tendency of runoff and sediment discharge evolution with an acceptable overestimation of peak runoff, and predicts more precise sediment discharge than rating methods do. In addition, with clear distribution of sediment mass trapped in the mountainous area, the GSPTM also showed a sediment delivery ratio of 30% to quantify how much mass produced by landslide and soil erosion is still trapped in mountainous area. The GSPTM is verified to be useful and capable of modeling the dynamic of sediment production and transport at watershed level, and can provide useful information for sustainable development of Shihmen Reservoir watershed. Full article
Figures

Figure 1

Water EISSN 2073-4441 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top