E-Mail Alert

Add your e-mail address to receive forthcoming issues of this journal:

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Special Issue "Managing Water Resources in Large River Basins"

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Water Resources Management and Governance".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 14 October 2019.

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. William Young

Water Global Practice, World Bank, 1818 H St NW, Washington, DC 20433, USA
Website | E-Mail
Interests: river basin management; water information; integrated water management; water security; water systems modelling
Guest Editor
Dr. Nagaraja Rao Harshadeep

Environment Global Practice, World Bank, 1818 H St NW, Washington, DC 20433, USA
Website | E-Mail
Interests: natural resources management; water security and IWRM; climate change; international water; water economics; hydromet

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Management of water resources in large rivers basins typically differs in important ways from management in smaller basins. While in smaller basins the focus of water resources management may be on project implementation, irrigation and drainage management, water use effciency and flood operations; in larger basins, because of the greater complexity and competing interests, there is often a greater need for long-term strategic river basin planning across sectors and jurisdictions, and considering social, environmental and economic outcomes. This puts a focus on sustainable development, including consumptive water use and non-consumptive water uses, such as inland navigation and hydropower. It also requires consideration of hard or technical issues—data, modelling, infrastructure—as well as soft issues of goverance, including legal frameworks, policies, institutions and political economy. This Special Issue of Water traverses these hard and soft aspects of managing water resources in large river basins through a series of diverse case studies from across the globe that demonstrate recent advances in both technical and goverance innovations in river basin management.

Dr. William Young
Dr. Nagaraja Rao Harshadeep
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Water is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • river basin planning
  • sustainable development
  • water governance
  • transboundary cooperation
  • flood forecasting
  • intersectoral allocation

Published Papers (2 papers)

View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-2
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle
Freshwater Ecosystems versus Hydropower Development: Environmental Assessments and Conservation Measures in the Transboundary Amur River Basin
Water 2019, 11(8), 1570; https://doi.org/10.3390/w11081570
Received: 18 June 2019 / Revised: 24 July 2019 / Accepted: 25 July 2019 / Published: 29 July 2019
PDF Full-text (3019 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Hydropower development causes a multitude of negative effects on freshwater ecosystems, and to prevent and minimize possible damage, environmental impact assessments must be conducted and optimal management scenarios designed. This paper examines the impacts of both existing and proposed hydropower development on the [...] Read more.
Hydropower development causes a multitude of negative effects on freshwater ecosystems, and to prevent and minimize possible damage, environmental impact assessments must be conducted and optimal management scenarios designed. This paper examines the impacts of both existing and proposed hydropower development on the transboundary Amur River basin shared by Russia, China, and Mongolia, including the effectiveness of different tools and measures to minimize damage. It demonstrates that the application of various assessment and conservation tools at the proper time and in the proper sequence is the key factor in mitigating and minimizing the environmental impacts of dams. The tools considered include basin-wide assessments of hydropower impacts, the creation of protected areas on rivers threatened by dam construction, and environmental flows. The results of this work show how the initial avoidance and mitigation of hydropower impacts at early planning stages are more productive than the application of any measures during and after dam construction, that the assessment of hydropower impacts must be performed at a basin level rather than be limited to a project implementation site, and that the full spectrum of possible development scenarios should be considered. In addition, this project demonstrates that stakeholder analysis and robust public engagement are as crucial for the success of environmental assessments as scientific research is for the protection of river basins. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Managing Water Resources in Large River Basins)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Copula-Based Research on the Multi-Objective Competition Mechanism in Cascade Reservoirs Optimal Operation
Water 2019, 11(5), 995; https://doi.org/10.3390/w11050995
Received: 10 April 2019 / Revised: 2 May 2019 / Accepted: 9 May 2019 / Published: 12 May 2019
PDF Full-text (4414 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Water resources systems are often characterized by multiple objectives. Typically, there is no single optimal solution which can simultaneously satisfy all the objectives but rather a set of technologically efficient non-inferior or Pareto optimal solutions exists. Another point regarding multi-objective optimization is that [...] Read more.
Water resources systems are often characterized by multiple objectives. Typically, there is no single optimal solution which can simultaneously satisfy all the objectives but rather a set of technologically efficient non-inferior or Pareto optimal solutions exists. Another point regarding multi-objective optimization is that interdependence and contradictions are common among one or more objectives. Therefore, understanding the competition mechanism of the multiple objectives plays a significant role in achieving an optimal solution. This study examines cascade reservoirs in the Heihe River Basin of China, with a focus on exploring the multi-objective competition mechanism among irrigation water shortage, ecological water shortage and the power generation of cascade hydropower stations. Our results can be summarized as follows: (1) the three-dimensional and two-dimensional spatial distributions of a Pareto set reveal that these three objectives, that is, irrigation water shortage, ecological water shortage and power generation of cascade hydropower stations cannot reach the theoretical optimal solution at the same time, implying the existence of mutual restrictions; (2) to avoid subjectivity in choosing limited representative solutions from the Pareto set, the long series of non-inferior solutions are adopted to study the competition mechanism. The premise of sufficient optimization suggests a macro-rule of ‘one falls and another rises,’ that is, when one objective value is inferior, the other two objectives show stronger and superior correlation; (3) the joint copula function of two variables is firstly employed to explore the multi-objective competition mechanism in this study. It is found that the competition between power generation and the other objectives is minimal. Furthermore, the recommended annual average water shortage are 1492 × 104 m3 for irrigation and 4951 × 104 m3 for ecological, respectively. This study is expected to provide a foundation for selective preference of a Pareto set and insights for other multi-objective research. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Managing Water Resources in Large River Basins)
Figures

Graphical abstract

Water EISSN 2073-4441 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top