Efficient Design, Operation, and Management of Urban Stormwater Systems

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Urban Water Management".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (10 May 2023) | Viewed by 12498

Special Issue Editors


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Municipal and Environmental Engineering, Xi'an University of Technology, Xi'an, China
Interests: urban stormwater management; non-point source pollution control; hydrological model; water environment simulation; water and wastewater treatment; ecohydrology

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Water Resources and Hydropower Engineering, Wuhan University, Wuhan, China
Interests: urban hydrology; urban water system; sponge city; hydrological model; environmental flow; adaptive management

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Environment and Energy, Peking University Shenzhen Graduate School, Shenzhen, China
Interests: runoff pollution; urban flooding; low impact development and green infrastructure; urban ecological hydrology; intelligent water system
College of Chemistry and Environmental Engineering, Shenzhen University, Shenzhen, China
Interests: urban stormwater processes; stormwater reuse; water environmental protection; sponge city; hydrology and water quality modelling

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We are seeking papers for a Special Issue entitled Efficient Design, Operation, and Management of Urban Stormwater Systems.

Urban expansion and climate change are constraining sustainable urban development, resulting in worse urban flooding, non-point source pollution, ecological deterioration, etc. Some stormwater management strategies have been proposed, such as sustainable drainage systems, water sensitive urban designs, low-impact development, and sponge cities. These strategies make cities more resilient to environmental changes and natural hazards to some degree. However, these strategies all require the solution of an underlying problem, which is how to efficiently design, operate, and manage urban rainwater systems.

In this context, we are proposing this Special Issue in order to present the latest theories, methods, technologies, and case studies related to urban stormwater management.

All related manuscripts are welcome. Topics of interest include, but are not limited to, the following: strategies of urban stormwater management; sponge city construction; resilient city construction; response of urban hydrology to climate change; rainwater harvesting and reuse safety; transport, accumulation, fate, and ecological risk of pollutants in green infrastructure; media clogging mechanisms; eco-friendly high-performance media; optimal design and layout of grey and green rainwater infrastructures; characteristics, formation mechanism, and regulation of urban waterlogging and non-point source pollution; urban hydrology and water quality modeling; impact of rainwater concentration infiltration on groundwater; operation and maintenance of rainwater infrastructure; intelligent stormwater management systems.

Original research papers and critical reviews are welcome.

Prof. Dr. Jiake Li
Prof. Dr. Xiang Zhang
Prof. Dr. Huapeng Qin
Dr. An Liu
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Water is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • urban flooding
  • urban non-point source pollution
  • LID
  • sponge city
  • resilience city
  • rainwater harvesting
  • pollutant transport mechanism
  • modelling
  • design and planning
  • operation and management

Published Papers (6 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

17 pages, 7290 KiB  
Article
Surrogate-Based Multiobjective Optimization of Detention Pond Volume in Sponge City
by Yuanyuan Yang, Yanfei Xin and Jiake Li
Water 2023, 15(15), 2705; https://doi.org/10.3390/w15152705 - 27 Jul 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 962
Abstract
Detention ponds are effective structures for stormwater management in the urban drainage system of sponge cities. The pond size is taken as the decision variable, while the cost, total suspended solids (TSS), and catchment peak outflow (CPO) serve as the objectives for optimizing [...] Read more.
Detention ponds are effective structures for stormwater management in the urban drainage system of sponge cities. The pond size is taken as the decision variable, while the cost, total suspended solids (TSS), and catchment peak outflow (CPO) serve as the objectives for optimizing the detention pond volume. First, we randomly generated 10,000 pond areas and input them into the stormwater management model to simulate the time series of outflow and suspended solids concentration, thereby generating samples by combining the set of pond area, corresponding cost, TSS, and CPO. Then, two backpropagation neural network models (i.e., BPNN-TSS and BPNN-CPO) were trained, tested, and evaluated for predicting TSS and CPO, respectively. We employed them as surrogates and used the non-dominated sorting genetic algorithm-II to solve the optimization problem. The results showed: (1) The BPNN models accurately predicted TSS and CPO (determination coefficient 0.988~0.996, Nash–Sutcliffe efficiency 0.988~0.997), and efficiently substituted stormwater management model simulations for optimization purposes (residuals −18.49~28.10 kg and −0.45~0.29 m3/s). (2) For the Pareto solutions, the detention pond reduced TSS by 0~8.33% and CPO by 0~72.44% and delayed their peaks by 4~52 min; the reduction in TSS and CPO tends to grow as pond size increases, and CPO reduction exhibits a minor marginal effect. (3) The surrogate-based approach saves 90.03% runtime while preserving the quality of the Pareto solutions, verifying reliability. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

11 pages, 2352 KiB  
Article
Radial Oxygen Loss of Three Plants under Hydroponic Culture and Its Relationships with Pollution Removal
by Yulu Wei, Chaokun Li, Liu Han, Hui Xi, Yinqiang Tian, Kanfolo Franck Hervé Yeo and Wendong Wang
Water 2023, 15(3), 532; https://doi.org/10.3390/w15030532 - 29 Jan 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1410
Abstract
The growth status, root exudates, radial oxygen loss, and sewage purification effect of plants acclimated with sewage and cultured with a nutrient solution were studied by selecting Acorus gramineus Aiton, Pistia stratiotes L., and Eichhornia crassipes (Mart.) Solms with the same individual [...] Read more.
The growth status, root exudates, radial oxygen loss, and sewage purification effect of plants acclimated with sewage and cultured with a nutrient solution were studied by selecting Acorus gramineus Aiton, Pistia stratiotes L., and Eichhornia crassipes (Mart.) Solms with the same individual size. The results showed that the root oxygen secretion rate of the Acorus gramineus Aiton was higher in light and dark conditions. For a single plant species, the oxygen secretion rate under light conditions was much higher than that under dark conditions. The root oxygen secretion rate of Acorus gramineus Aiton was the highest (2.03 µmol O2/h/plant), followed by Pistia stratiotes L. (1.68 µmol O2/h/plant), and the root oxygen secretion rate of Eichhornia crassipes (Mart.) Solms was the lowest (1.15 µmol O2/h/plant). After a period of adaptation, plants showed strong removal effects on COD, NH3-N, TN, and TP. The removal intensity was in the order of Acorus gramineus Aiton > Pistia stratiotes L. > Eichhornia crassipes (Mart.) Solms; the higher the temperature, the bigger the removal rate. These results were consistent with Acorus gramineus Aiton‘s organic matter secretion and radial oxygen loss, which were better than those of Pistia stratiotes L. and Eichhornia crassipes (Mart.) Solms. Three kinds of plants had better COD removal effects in an acidic environment and better TP removal effects in an alkaline environment. The results show that using the Acorus gramineus Aiton can achieve better remediation of polluted water bodies. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

13 pages, 3418 KiB  
Article
Characteristics of Nitrifying and Denitrifying Microbes in the Bioretention Cell with Submerged Zone during a Dry Period
by Xiaoyue Li, Chenxi Xia, Yuhang Sun, Wei Ding and Huapeng Qin
Water 2022, 14(21), 3503; https://doi.org/10.3390/w14213503 - 2 Nov 2022
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 2513
Abstract
Microbial transformation is a vital mechanism to internally treat nitrogen (N) within bioretention cells (BRCs); nitrifying and denitrifying microorganisms are the main drivers of permanent nitrogen removal. The limited research of the characteristics of nitrifying and denitrifying microbes in different layers during dry [...] Read more.
Microbial transformation is a vital mechanism to internally treat nitrogen (N) within bioretention cells (BRCs); nitrifying and denitrifying microorganisms are the main drivers of permanent nitrogen removal. The limited research of the characteristics of nitrifying and denitrifying microbes in different layers during dry periods has prevented further understanding of nitrogen behavior in bioretention cells. In this paper, high-throughput sequencing technology and qPCR were used to analyze the microbial community and the abundance of six functional genes in soil and water samples of a layered BRC. This study found that the microbial community structure of the gravel layer was distinguished from that of the other three layers. With the extension in the dry period, the amount of microbial species shared by all four layers increased, showing a convergent succession of microorganisms. The nitrification and denitrification functional genes mainly existed in the upper layer of the bioretention cell; in addition, the abundance of the functional genes in the sand layer increased after rainfall and peaked at about 24–48 h, after which the abundance decreased and became steady. Correlation analysis indicated that the abundance of nitrification and denitrification functional genes was significantly affected by TOC, ammonia nitrogen concentration and nitrate nitrogen concentration. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

14 pages, 3275 KiB  
Article
Seasonal Variation in Recovery Process of Rainwater Retention Capacity for Green Roofs
by Yinchao Hu, Huapeng Qin, Yiming Ouyang and Shaw-Lei Yu
Water 2022, 14(18), 2799; https://doi.org/10.3390/w14182799 - 8 Sep 2022
Viewed by 2484
Abstract
Green roofs need to quickly recover their water retention capacity between rainfall events to maintain their rainwater retention performance. In this study, the authors observed the rainwater retention, recovery process, and plant eco-physiological performance of green roofs with four local vegetation species under [...] Read more.
Green roofs need to quickly recover their water retention capacity between rainfall events to maintain their rainwater retention performance. In this study, the authors observed the rainwater retention, recovery process, and plant eco-physiological performance of green roofs with four local vegetation species under a typical subtropical monsoon climate for two years. The half-life of the water content after each rainfall (T50) was used to describe the recovery rate. The results indicate that (1) the decline in the water content after rainfall can be well described by an exponential decline curve (R2 > 0.7), and the average T50 of green roofs with Plectranthus prostratus Gürke was the shortest among the four plants; (2) the T50 in the wet season was significantly shorter than that in the dry season (p < 0.01) because of the seasonal variations in the weather conditions and eco-physiological activity, such as vegetation coverage and transpiration; (3) the rainwater retention of green roofs for rainfall events in the wet season was significantly lower than that in the dry season due to a relatively short antecedent dry period; (4) plants with a high maximum photosynthetic capacity, a strong root system, drought resistance, and large vegetation coverage were recommended as green roof plants. Above all, P. prostrates was found to be the best choice in the study. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

13 pages, 3035 KiB  
Article
Experimental Study of Al-Modified Zeolite with Oxygen Nanobubbles in Repairing Black Odorous Sediments in River Channels
by Chao Guo, Huanyuan Wang, Yulu Wei, Jiake Li, Biao Peng and Xiaoxiao Shu
Water 2022, 14(14), 2194; https://doi.org/10.3390/w14142194 - 11 Jul 2022
Viewed by 1385
Abstract
As an extreme phenomenon of water pollution, black odorous water not only causes ecological damage, but also severely restricts urban development. Presently, the in situ remediation technology for sediment from river channels is still undeveloped, and there are many bottlenecks in the key [...] Read more.
As an extreme phenomenon of water pollution, black odorous water not only causes ecological damage, but also severely restricts urban development. Presently, the in situ remediation technology for sediment from river channels is still undeveloped, and there are many bottlenecks in the key technologies for sediment pollution control and ecological restoration. In this study, three experimental tanks were used to explore the restoration effect of Al-modified zeolite with oxygen nanobubbles on black odorous sediment from the Shichuan River. One of the tanks housed Typha orientalis and Canna indica L. (TC), another tank housed the same plants and had Al-modified zeolite with oxygen nanobubbles (TC+AMZON), and the last tank was used as a comparison test (CS). The results show that the nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) in the sediment are violently released into the surrounding water. However, TC+AMZON could effectively inhibit the release of P. The released amount of soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP) from the pore water in the sediment reached its maximum at 40 d, and the amounts were 122.97% and 74.32% greater in TC and CS, respectively, than in TC+AMZON. However, the released amount of total phosphorus (TP) reached its maximum at 70 d, and the amounts were 260.14% and 218.23% greater in TC and CS, respectively, than in TC+AMZON. TC+AMZON significantly increased the dissolved oxygen (DO) and the oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) of pore water in the sediment in the early stages of the test. At 0 d, the DO content in TC+AMZON reached 10.6 mg/L, which is 112.0% and 178.95% greater than in TC and CS, respectively. The change law of ORP in the sediment is consistent with the DO. TC+AMZON significantly improved the transparency and reduced the content of chlorophylla in the upper water and could slightly reduce the N and P content in overlying water. The transparency of TC+AMZON increased by 130.76% and 58.73%, and chlorophylla decreased by 55.6% and 50.0% when compared to TC and CS, respectively. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

10 pages, 1836 KiB  
Article
Ranking Three Water Sensitive Urban Design (WSUD) Practices Based on Hydraulic and Water Quality Treatment Performance: Implications for Effective Stormwater Treatment Design
by An Liu, Prasanna Egodawatta and Ashantha Goonetilleke
Water 2022, 14(8), 1296; https://doi.org/10.3390/w14081296 - 15 Apr 2022
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 2460
Abstract
Bioretention basins, constructed wetlands and roadside swales are among the most common Water-Sensitive Urban Design (WSUD) or stormwater quality treatment systems. Although these systems can reduce stormwater quantity and improve quality, their hydraulic and water quality treatment performances are different. The aim of [...] Read more.
Bioretention basins, constructed wetlands and roadside swales are among the most common Water-Sensitive Urban Design (WSUD) or stormwater quality treatment systems. Although these systems can reduce stormwater quantity and improve quality, their hydraulic and water quality treatment performances are different. The aim of this study was to investigate the hydraulic and water quality performance of a bioretention basin, a constructed wetland and a roadside swale by analyzing monitored water quantity and quality data from a range of rainfall events using a ranking approach. The study outcomes showed that a bioretention basin performed better in relation to peak flow and runoff volume reduction while the constructed wetland tended to produce better outflow water quality. The roadside swale had a relatively lower capacity for treating stormwater. These results suggest that a bioretention basin could be the preferred option when the primary requirement is water quantity improvement. However, if water quality improvement is the primary consideration, a constructed wetland could be more efficient. Additionally, when designing a treatment train, it appears to be preferable to place a bioretention basin prior to a constructed wetland. Further, a swale appears to be more appropriate for use as a pretreatment device. The research study outcomes will contribute to effective stormwater treatment design. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop