Material Cycling’s around the Sediment-Water Interface: Implications for Understanding, Assessment, Remediation of Eutrophicated and Contaminated Sediment

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Water Quality and Contamination".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 August 2023) | Viewed by 2627

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Port and Airport Research Institute, Yokosuka, Japan
Interests: eutrophication in lakes and coastal regions

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Guest Editor
Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, National Institute of Technology, Oita College, Oita, Japan
Interests: oxygen transfer at the sediment/water interface in natural and humanmade water systems

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Some water bodies have begun to improve around the world owning to effective mitigation measures, but many still suffer from the adverse effects of eutrophication and pollution. The aquatic environment and its ecosystem are strongly regulated by the material cycles happening in the water bodies. Balance in the sediment-water interface plays a critical role in controlling the dynamics of these material cycles. These processes are particularly exacerbated in a eutrophic and contaminated water environment. As many of the causative materials tend to accumulate on the bottom-most layers of the water column, consequently, a coupled impact of sediment will be expected. Hence, it is essential to understand and evaluate the precise processes that control the variability of material balances around the sediment-water interface.

In this Special Issue, we would like to compile the latest discoveries and achievements of oxygen, nitrogen, phosphorus, sulfide, and heavy metal cyclings around the sediment-water interface to provide a foundation for the advancement of future research in this particular field. A wide variety of high-quality papers that examine material cycling through monitoring, laboratory, and field-scale experiments and numerical modeling studies will be welcomed.

Dr. Tetsunori Inoue
Prof. Dr. Makoto Higashino
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • sediment-water interface
  • oxygen
  • nitrogen
  • phosphorus
  • sulfide
  • heavy metal

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

16 pages, 3456 KiB  
Article
Application of Drifted Pumice Stone as a Sand-Capping Material
by Tetsunori Inoue and Isamu Fujita
Water 2023, 15(5), 942; https://doi.org/10.3390/w15050942 - 1 Mar 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1799
Abstract
Large amounts of pumice stone generated by the submarine volcanic eruption at Fukutoku Okanoba on 13 August 2021 drifted ashore, affecting ship navigation and fishery operations and posing challenges for disposal and a risk to benthic sea-life. As a new approach to managing [...] Read more.
Large amounts of pumice stone generated by the submarine volcanic eruption at Fukutoku Okanoba on 13 August 2021 drifted ashore, affecting ship navigation and fishery operations and posing challenges for disposal and a risk to benthic sea-life. As a new approach to managing ejected pumice from submarine eruptions, we investigated the possibility of using pumice as a sand-capping material for eutrophic sediments through laboratory experiments. Crushed pumice as a sand cover material effectively reduced the sedimentary oxygen consumption rate. Nutrient release from sediment showed a similar trend, with ~25% and 82% reductions in NH4-N and PO4-P release rates, respectively. Furthermore, bivalve exposure experiments using crushed pumice suspended in seawater showed no adverse effects specific to pumice and lowered bivalve mortality to a greater extent than did using kaolin at the same concentration. This could be related to the differences in gill accumulation and blockage owing to the particle size variation of suspended particles. These results suggest that crushed pumice is effective for sand-capping and suitably suppresses oxygen consumption and nutrient release from sediments. Full article
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12 pages, 1008 KiB  
Article
Alteration of Dissimilatory Nitrate Reduction Pathways in the Intertidal Sediment during Macroalgae Blooms
by Yukiko Senga, Tsubasa Sato, Kanae Shibaki, Megumi Kuroiwa, Seiichi Nohara and Yuichi Suwa
Water 2022, 14(19), 3022; https://doi.org/10.3390/w14193022 - 26 Sep 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1382
Abstract
To elucidate the effect of macroalgae blooms on dissimilatory nitrate reduction pathways (denitrification, anammox, and DNRA) in sediments of the hypereutrophic Yatsu tidal flat, eastern Japan, sediment denitrification, anammox, and DNRA rates were measured using a 15N tracer technique at two sites [...] Read more.
To elucidate the effect of macroalgae blooms on dissimilatory nitrate reduction pathways (denitrification, anammox, and DNRA) in sediments of the hypereutrophic Yatsu tidal flat, eastern Japan, sediment denitrification, anammox, and DNRA rates were measured using a 15N tracer technique at two sites affected and unaffected by macroalgae (Ulva) blooms and in incubation experiments with and without Ulva. Anammox was insignificant at both sites and in both experiments. The denitrification rate was consistently higher than the DNRA rate, and its contributions to the total dissimilatory nitrate reduction were 82% and 85% at sites affected and unaffected by Ulva, respectively. In a sediment incubation experiment with Ulva, the contribution of DNRA had increased to approximately 30% on day 7, which is when the sulfide concentration was the highest. Sulfide produced by sulfate reduction during macroalgae blooms inhibited denitrification and did not change the DNRA, and consequently increased the DNRA contribution. On day 21, after reaching the peak sulfide concentration during the late macroalgae collapse, the DNRA contribution decreased to 15%. These results indicated that the DNRA contribution was greater during the macroalgae blooms than at the collapse, although denitrification dominated DNRA regardless of the macroalgal status. Therefore, vigorous macroalgae cover and sulfide production under the macroalgae cover had an important impact on the nitrogen dynamics. Full article
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