Special Issue "Innovative Model Strategies in Hydraulics"

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Hydraulics and Hydrodynamics".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2020).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Valentin Heller
Website
Guest Editor
Environmental Fluid Mechanics and Geoprocesses Research Group, Department of Civil Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, The University of Nottingham, Nottingham, NG7 2RD, UK
Interests: coastal engineering; computational fluid dynamics; experimental fluid dynamics; fuid-structure interaction; granular slides; hydraulic structures; landslide-tsunamis; scale effects; similarity
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Physical hydraulic modelling at a reduced size is an important research and engineering method to understand complex fluid flows, to design, optimize, and visualize sound engineering solutions, and to provide data to calibrate and validate numerical models.

A major limitation of laboratory models are model and scale effects. Many innovative strategies have been developed to model complex hydraulic phenomena, to overcome scale effects, and to improve model–prototype similarity in general.

Celebrated examples of modelling hydraulic phenomena include Scott Russell’s solitary wave generator, Hunter Rouse’s investigation of the turbulence characteristics in hydraulic jumps with air flow under a rigid boundary, and John E. Simpson’s conveyor belt approach to investigate gravity currents.

Many further strategies to avoid, compensate, or correct scale effects and to improve model–prototype similarity have been used, such as experimental and numerical scale series to quantify scale effects and to develop upscaling methods, distorted models in sediment transport, cavitation tunnels to investigate cavitation, the replacement of water with another fluid such as air, and the experimental exploitation of the Reynolds number invariance and self-similarity.

This Special Issue is dedicated to such scaling and model strategies in hydraulics. It aims to present research papers, reviews (state of the art), and case studies of novel, innovative, and/or non-standard laboratory strategies to model complex fluid flows and to improve model–prototype similarity by overcoming scale effects. I am looking forward to receiving original and innovative contributions of high quality.

Dr. Valentin Heller
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Water is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • alternative model approaches
  • experimental fluid dynamics
  • Froude scaling
  • model effects
  • model distortion
  • model–prototype similarity
  • physical hydraulic modelling
  • Reynolds number invariance
  • scale effects
  • scale series

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Physical Modelling of Arctic Coastlines—Progress and Limitations
Water 2020, 12(8), 2254; https://doi.org/10.3390/w12082254 - 11 Aug 2020
Viewed by 747
Abstract
Permafrost coastlines represent a large portion of the world’s coastal area and these areas have become increasingly vulnerable in the face of climate change. The predominant mechanism of coastal erosion in these areas has been identified through several observational studies as thermomechanical erosion—a [...] Read more.
Permafrost coastlines represent a large portion of the world’s coastal area and these areas have become increasingly vulnerable in the face of climate change. The predominant mechanism of coastal erosion in these areas has been identified through several observational studies as thermomechanical erosion—a joint removal of sediment through the melting of interstitial ice (thermal energy) and abrasion from incoming waves (mechanical energy). However, further developments are needed looking how common design parameters in coastal engineering (such as wave height, period, sediment size, etc.) contribute to the process. This paper presents the current state of the art with the objective of establishing the necessary research background to develop a process-based approach to predicting permafrost erosion. To that end, an overarching framework is presented that includes all major, erosion-relevant processes, while delineating means to accomplish permafrost modelling in experimental studies. Preliminary modelling of generations zero and one models, within this novel framework, was also performed to allow for early conclusions as to how well permafrost erosion can currently be modelled without more sophisticated setups. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Innovative Model Strategies in Hydraulics)
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Open AccessArticle
Numerical Simulation of the Sound Field of a Five-Stage Centrifugal Pump with Different Turbulence Models
Water 2019, 11(9), 1777; https://doi.org/10.3390/w11091777 - 26 Aug 2019
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 1080
Abstract
To study the influence of the turbulence model on the sound field of pumps, the standard k-ε, Re-normalization Group (RNG) k-ε and Shear Stress Transfer (SST) k-ω models were employed to simulate flow and sound fields of a five-stage centrifugal pump with [...] Read more.
To study the influence of the turbulence model on the sound field of pumps, the standard k-ε, Re-normalization Group (RNG) k-ε and Shear Stress Transfer (SST) k-ω models were employed to simulate flow and sound fields of a five-stage centrifugal pump with a vaned-diffuser. The vibration characteristics of the pump were simulated with the modal response method. A vibration experiment in the pump was carried out to verify the feasibility of the numerical simulation of the hydrodynamic noise in the pump. Results show that in the spectrum of internal and external noise, the peak value appears at axial passing frequency (APF) and its harmonic frequency. Compared with the standard k-ε model, the RNG k-ε and SST k-ω models show good consistence with the noise characteristics of experimental results, indicating the characteristic frequency and revealing the approximate behavior of the sound field in the pump. In general, the simulation of the sound field based on the RNG k-ε model is most appropriate for the multistage centrifugal pump with a vaned-diffuser. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Innovative Model Strategies in Hydraulics)
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