Special Issue "Innovations in Water Research 2020"

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Wastewater Treatment and Reuse".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2020).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Iwona Skoczko
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Faculty of Civil Engineering and Environmental Sciences, Bialystok University of Technology, Wiejska 45A, 15–351 Białystok, Poland
Interests: water and wastewater treatment; water and wastewater quality; water pollution monitoring; filtration; activated sludge
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Dorota Anna Krawczyk
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Faculty of Environmental and Civil Engineering, Bialystok University of Technology, 15-351 Białystok, Poland
Interests: energy certification of buildings; possibility of improvements in the energy performance of facilities; energy Saving versus Indoor Air Quality, renewable energy sources
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Antonio Rodero Serrano
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Physics, School of Engineering Sciences of Belmez, University of Córdoba, 14071 Córdoba, Spain
Interests: water treatment; water used in energy production; renewable energy for application in hot domestic water and heating; activation of water by plasma technology; application of activated water
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue of Water includes interesting scientific manuscripts exploring the following current research trends:

  1. Drinking water quality;
  2. Ground and surface water quality and pollution;
  3. Industrial and technological water quality;
  4. Wastewater treatment with physical, chemical and biological methods;
  5. Natural methods for water and wastewater treatment;
  6. Biotechnology of water;
  7. Single processes for the elimination of selected pollutants from water and wastewater;
  8. Integrated processes for the elimination of selected pollutants from water and wastewater.

This Special Issue of Water will help readers recognize the main water and wastewater problems from a scientific and technological point of view, as well as propose any innovative solutions. By knowing potential water hazards and the ways to solve them, readers may understand other opinions and perspectives, that would help in future research.

Prof. Dr. Iwona Skoczko
Prof. Dr. Dorota Anna Krawczyk
Prof. Dr. Antonio Rodero Serrano
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Water is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • water and wastewater treatment
  • water and wastewater quality
  • water pollution monitoring

Published Papers (5 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review, Other

Article
Differences in the Composition of Leachate from Active and Non-Operational Municipal Waste Landfills in Poland
Water 2020, 12(11), 3129; https://doi.org/10.3390/w12113129 - 08 Nov 2020
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 758
Abstract
Leachate formation is one of the many environmental hazards associated with landfilling. The leachate may migrate from the landfill to surface water and groundwater, posing a potential threat to aquatic ecosystems. Moreover, its harmful effect on human health and life has been proven. [...] Read more.
Leachate formation is one of the many environmental hazards associated with landfilling. The leachate may migrate from the landfill to surface water and groundwater, posing a potential threat to aquatic ecosystems. Moreover, its harmful effect on human health and life has been proven. Due to the risks that landfill leachates may pose, it is necessary to control the state of the environment in their surroundings. The paper presents an example of the application of selected statistical methods (basic statistics, statistical tests, principal component analysis) to assess the impact of individual pollution indicators on the quality of landfill leachates. The conducted analysis showed the existence of significant differences between the surveyed active (Legnica, Jawor) and non-operational (Wrocław, Bielawa) landfills in Poland. These differences were especially visible in the cases of the following: electric conductivity (EC) (non-operational landfills 1915–5075 μS/cm, active 5093–11,370 μS/cm), concentrations of total Kjeldahl nitrogen (TKN) (non-operational landfills 0.18–294.5 mg N/dm3, active 167.56–907.4 mg N/dm3), chemical oxygen demand (COD), organic nitrogen (ON), ammonium nitrogen (AN), total solids (TS), total dissolved solids (TDS), total suspended solids (TSS), sulfates, chlorides, sodium, potassium, calcium, magnesium and nickel. Selected indicators should help to determine the progress of decomposition processes inside the landfill and the potential impact of leachate on the environment, and should be used in the mandatory monitoring of landfills. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Innovations in Water Research 2020)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Assessment of the Impact of Sewage Storage Ponds on the Water Environment in Surrounding Area
Water 2020, 12(9), 2483; https://doi.org/10.3390/w12092483 - 05 Sep 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 575
Abstract
Due to geographical limitations (lack of natural receivers of treated wastewater) large sewage storage ponds are the main method of sewage disposal in the Republic of Kazakhstan. The paper presents the results of research on the environmental impact of sewage ponds serving the [...] Read more.
Due to geographical limitations (lack of natural receivers of treated wastewater) large sewage storage ponds are the main method of sewage disposal in the Republic of Kazakhstan. The paper presents the results of research on the environmental impact of sewage ponds serving the city of Kostanay (Kazakhstan). The scope of the research included the determination of basic quality parameters of raw and treated wastewater, the analysis of the chemical composition of groundwater in the vicinity of sewage ponds, and the analysis of the water quality of the Tobol River. The obtained results showed that efficiency of treatment facilities was unsatisfactory and water quality in the ponds did not meet requirements for surface waters for fishery. Highest contamination of groundwater was observed in sampling points close to the sewage ponds and was decreasing while the distance from the ponds was increasing. Multivariate analysis of the research data indicated that sewage from storage ponds, infiltrating into the ground, may affect quality of groundwater, which in turn supplying the Tobol River may also determine the quality of the river water. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Innovations in Water Research 2020)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Long-Term Trends in 20-Day Cumulative Precipitation for Residential Rainwater Harvesting in Poland
Water 2020, 12(7), 1932; https://doi.org/10.3390/w12071932 - 07 Jul 2020
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 733
Abstract
Rainwater harvesting (RWH) for domestic uses is widely regarded as an economic and ecological solution in water conservation and storm management programs. This paper aims at evaluating long-term trends in 20-day cumulative rainfall periods per year in Poland, for assessing its impact on [...] Read more.
Rainwater harvesting (RWH) for domestic uses is widely regarded as an economic and ecological solution in water conservation and storm management programs. This paper aims at evaluating long-term trends in 20-day cumulative rainfall periods per year in Poland, for assessing its impact on the design and operation conditions for RWH systems and resource availability. The time-series employed corresponds to a set of 50-year long time-series of rainfall (from 1970 to 2019) recorded at 19 synoptic meteorological stations scattered across Poland, one of the European countries with the lowest water availability index. The methods employed for assessing trends were the Mann–Kendall test (M–K) and the Sen’s slope estimator. Most of the datasets exhibit stationary behaviour during the 50-year long period, however, statistically significant downward trends were detected for precipitations in Wrocław and Opole. The findings of this study are valuable assets for integrated water management and sustainable planning in Poland. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Innovations in Water Research 2020)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research, Other

Review
Challenges in the Development of Hydropower in Selected European Countries
Water 2020, 12(12), 3542; https://doi.org/10.3390/w12123542 - 16 Dec 2020
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 770
Abstract
Hydropower in Europe is playing an increasingly important role as a renewable source of energy. Its share of the final energy consumption varies from country to country, posing different challenges in each. The European Union member states are obliged, according to energy policy, [...] Read more.
Hydropower in Europe is playing an increasingly important role as a renewable source of energy. Its share of the final energy consumption varies from country to country, posing different challenges in each. The European Union member states are obliged, according to energy policy, to increase the share of renewable energy. This article presents the challenges related to the development of hydropower in four countries with different shares of domestic electricity production from hydropower plants: Albania (100% share in 2019), Slovenia (25.7%), Poland (1.1%), and Estonia (0.3%). Particular attention is paid to the issues of rational management of water resources in connection to Europe’s energy policy. As a result of the case study analysis, the challenges in the development of hydropower are identified, as well as ways to solve them. In addition, a comprehensive analysis of the impact of social, economic, environmental and climate change factors on the development of hydropower was conducted. At present, whether the assumed goals of the European Union’s energy policy will be achieved is impossible to determine for the whole of Europe. Achieving these goals will be possible only after individual countries prepare comprehensive reports on the topics of renewable energy sources, including hydropower. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Innovations in Water Research 2020)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Other

Jump to: Research, Review

Case Report
Experience from the Implementation and Operation of the Biological Membrane Reactor (MBR) at the Modernized Wastewater Treatment Plant in Wydminy
Water 2020, 12(12), 3410; https://doi.org/10.3390/w12123410 - 04 Dec 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 514
Abstract
Biological membrane reactors or membrane bioreactors (MBRs) based on pressure separation techniques are placed among the latest and most modern methods of wastewater treatment. Currently, this method is becoming more and more popular and is being implemented in smaller and larger wastewater treatment [...] Read more.
Biological membrane reactors or membrane bioreactors (MBRs) based on pressure separation techniques are placed among the latest and most modern methods of wastewater treatment. Currently, this method is becoming more and more popular and is being implemented in smaller and larger wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). However, technologists, operators, and managers of small WWTPs often do not understand the MBR technology installed in their sites and need extensive professional and technological information. The aim of this study was to analyze the modernized WWTP in a small town of Wydminy, located in northeastern Poland in the Great Masurian Lakes region, where the traditional secondary settling tank was replaced by an MBR. The effectiveness of wastewater treatment before modernization and after installation of the membrane module was compared. On the basis of the conducted research, it was noted that the operation of the plant after modernization is more cost-intensive. There were additional electricity costs due to ensuring adequate pressure on the membrane. Nevertheless, the obtained results of the removal of contaminants place the plant in Wydminy in the group of the most effective Polish sewage treatment plants, as compared to the results obtained in other facilities. The MBR operation also places high demands on the exploiters, prompting them to observe even the smallest changes. The conducted research is a type of a case study, which could give the readers an understanding of the necessity of traditional WWTP modernization with MBR. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Innovations in Water Research 2020)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop