Special Issue "Application of Biochar for Effective Removal of Hazardous Chemicals from Wastewater"

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Wastewater Treatment and Reuse".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 August 2021) | Viewed by 4083

Special Issue Editors

Dr. María Ángeles Martín-Lara
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Sciences, University of Granada, 18071 Granada, Spain
Interests: biomass gasification, pyrolysis, and torrefaction; adsorption of contaminants (mainly heavy metals) by porous solids; advances in mineral processing and management of mining waste; plastic waste management; life cycle assessment
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Mario J. Muñoz Batista
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Sciences, University of Granada, Avda. Fuentenueva, s/n, 18071 Granada, Spain
Interests: heterogeneous catalysis; photocatalysis; waste and biomass valorization; photoreactor modelling; kinetic studies
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Biochar is a carbon-rich product obtained from thermal decomposition of biomass and waste under no oxygen or limited oxygen condition. Initial studies have been focused on its use as a soil amendment. However, recent advances in biochar production have extended its use in electrochemical energy storage, catalytic processes, water and wastewater treatment or other emerging applications. The papers of this special issue will address the current state of the art on the development, design, and operation mode of different biochar remediation processes. In addition, the advantages and disadvantages of this system in relation to other conventional processes will be considered. Although the focus of this Special Issue is the use of biochar for effective removal of hazardous chemicals from wastewater, contributions are not limited to this topic, and quality research in other emerging applications will be relevant for the scope of the Special Issue.

Prof. Dr. María Ángeles Martín-Lara
Prof. Dr. Mario J. Muñoz-Batista
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • Biochar
  • Wastewater treatment
  • Heavy metals
  • Hazardous chemicals
  • Pyrolysis
  • Adsorption

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Article
Development of Biochars Derived from Water Bamboo (Zizania latifolia) Shoot Husks Using Pyrolysis and Ultrasound-Assisted Pyrolysis for the Treatment of Reactive Black 5 (RB5) in Wastewater
Water 2021, 13(12), 1615; https://doi.org/10.3390/w13121615 - 08 Jun 2021
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 1415
Abstract
Adsorbent made by carbonization of biomass under oxygen-limited conditions has become a promising material for wastewater treatment owing to its cost-effective, simple, and eco-friendly processing method. Ultrasound is considered a green technique to modify carbon materials because it uses water as the solvent. [...] Read more.
Adsorbent made by carbonization of biomass under oxygen-limited conditions has become a promising material for wastewater treatment owing to its cost-effective, simple, and eco-friendly processing method. Ultrasound is considered a green technique to modify carbon materials because it uses water as the solvent. In this study, a comparison of Reactive Black 5 (RB5) adsorption capacity between biochar (BC) generated by pyrolysis of water bamboo (Zizania latifolia) husks at 600 °C and ultrasound-assisted biochar (UBC) produced by pyrolysis at 600 °C assisted by ultrasonic irradiation was performed. UBC showed a greater reaction rate and reached about 80% removal efficiency after 4 h, while it took 24 h for BC to reach that level. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) images indicated that the UBC morphology surface was more porous, with the structure of the combination of denser mesopores enhancing physiochemical properties of UBC. By Brunauer, Emmett, and Teller (BET), the specific surface areas of adsorbent materials were analyzed, and the surface areas of BC and UBC were 56.296 m2/g and 141.213 m2/g, respectively. Moreover, the pore volume of UBC was 0.039 cm3/g, which was higher than that of BC at 0.013 cm3/g. The adsorption isotherms and kinetics revealed the better fits of reactions to Langmuir isotherm and pseudo-second-order kinetic model, indicating the inclination towards monolayer adsorption and chemisorption of RB5 on water bamboo husk-based UBC. Full article
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Article
Characterization and Use of Char Produced from Pyrolysis of Post-Consumer Mixed Plastic Waste
Water 2021, 13(9), 1188; https://doi.org/10.3390/w13091188 - 25 Apr 2021
Cited by 11 | Viewed by 1129
Abstract
In this work, the pyrolysis of post-consumer mixed plastic waste (polypropylene (PP), polystyrene (PS) and polyethylene film (PE)) is carried out. The solid product of the pyrolysis is characterized and tested for its use as adsorbent of lead present in aqueous media. The [...] Read more.
In this work, the pyrolysis of post-consumer mixed plastic waste (polypropylene (PP), polystyrene (PS) and polyethylene film (PE)) is carried out. The solid product of the pyrolysis is characterized and tested for its use as adsorbent of lead present in aqueous media. The pyrolysis temperature has a great influence on the solid product yield, decreasing when the temperature increases. The highest yield to solid product obtained is from the pyrolysis of film at lower temperature (450 °C), reaching almost 14%. The results of product solid characterization reveal that the carbon, hydrogen and nitrogen content decreases with increasing pyrolysis temperature. Furthermore, both the ash and the volatile content are related to the pyrolysis temperature. The ash content is higher when the pyrolysis temperature is higher, while when the temperature increases, a solid product with lower volatile content is obtained. In respect to specific surface area, a higher pyrolysis temperature improves the properties of the solid product as an adsorbent. The adsorption capacity increases as the pyrolysis temperature increases, with the highest value of 7.91 mg/g for the solid obtained in the pyrolysis at 550 °C. In addition, adsorption capacity increases as the initial concentration of lead rises, reaching a maximum value close to 26 mg/g for an initial concentration of 40 mg/L. The Sips model is the one that best reproduces the experimental results of the adsorption process equilibrium study. Full article
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Article
Greenhouse Crop Residue and Its Derived Biochar: Potential as Adsorbent of Cobalt from Aqueous Solutions
Water 2020, 12(5), 1282; https://doi.org/10.3390/w12051282 - 30 Apr 2020
Cited by 11 | Viewed by 1155
Abstract
This work is focused on the removal of cobalt from aqueous solutions using the greenhouse crop residue and biochars resulting from its pyrolysis at different temperatures, which have not been previously used for this purpose. This study aims to provide insights into the [...] Read more.
This work is focused on the removal of cobalt from aqueous solutions using the greenhouse crop residue and biochars resulting from its pyrolysis at different temperatures, which have not been previously used for this purpose. This study aims to provide insights into the effect of pyrolysis temperature as a key parameter on the cobalt adsorption capacity of these materials. Firstly, the main physicochemical properties of greenhouse crop residue and its biochars prepared under different pyrolysis temperatures were characterized by elemental analysis and FT-IR, among others. Then, the cobalt adsorption capacity of materials was evaluated in batch systems. The best results were obtained for the biochar prepared by pyrolysis at 450 °C (adsorption capacity of 28 mg/g). Generally, the adsorption capacity of the materials increased with pyrolysis temperature. However, when the treatment temperature was increased up to 550 °C, a biochar with worse properties and behavior than cobalt adsorbent was produced. Rather than surface area and other physical properties, functional groups were found to influence cobalt adsorption onto the prepared materials. The adsorption kinetics showed that the adsorption followed pseudo-second-order kinetics model. The obtained equilibrium data were fitted better by the Langmuir model rather than the Freundlich model. Finally, decomposition of loaded-materials was analyzed to assess their possible recycling as fuel materials. The study suggested that greenhouse crop residue can be used as a low-cost alternative adsorbent for cobalt removal from aqueous solutions. Full article
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