Special Issue "Biomonitors in Water Quality Control"

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Aquatic Systems—Quality and Contamination".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Rubén Villares
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Functional Biology (Ecology Unit), EPSE, Lugo, University of Santiago de Compostela, Spain
Interests: biomonitors; trace elements; eutrophication; mosses; macroalgae; rivers; coasts; estuaries

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The need for biological monitoring of contamination in aquatic ecosystems is now widely accepted, while it is known that traditional physicochemical measures of water quality are not enough. Although pollution is precisely a problem because it affects living beings, for a long time, its control relied exclusively on the study of abiotic compartments. The use of organisms in pollutant monitoring has clear advantages, such as allowing estimation of the bioavailable fraction of the contaminants; permitting to discover the presence of contaminants that are difficult to quantify through other methods, such as water analysis; or making it possible to detect punctual peaks of pollution. The relevance of organisms when assessing the status of a body of water is currently recognized even in the legislation, as in the European Water Framework Directive or the Federal Water Pollution Control Law in the United States. A simple search in Scopus of the term “biomonitoring” retrieves a result of more than 18,000 documents, the first from the decade of the seventies, with practically exponential subsequent growth and more than a thousand papers published annually in recent years, which gives an idea of the importance that the topic has presently acquired in the scientific community.

This Special Issue of Water will compile studies of biological monitoring of water quality control in any type of aquatic ecosystems, whether from inland waters (rivers, lakes, inland seas, etc.) or marine waters.

Prof. Dr. Rubén Villares
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Water is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • biomonitoring
  • contamination
  • pollution
  • rivers
  • lakes
  • marine
  • estuaries

Published Papers (1 paper)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle
Integrated Monitoring with Moss-Bag and Mussel Transplants in Reservoirs
Water 2020, 12(6), 1800; https://doi.org/10.3390/w12061800 - 24 Jun 2020
Abstract
For the first time, transplants with moss-bags and mussels together were applied to study the water quality in standing water bodies. The tested species: Fontinalis antipyretica Hedw. and Sinanodonta woodiana (Lea, 1834) were collected from unpolluted sites and analyzed to obtain background levels. [...] Read more.
For the first time, transplants with moss-bags and mussels together were applied to study the water quality in standing water bodies. The tested species: Fontinalis antipyretica Hedw. and Sinanodonta woodiana (Lea, 1834) were collected from unpolluted sites and analyzed to obtain background levels. Then, the moss and mussels were left in cages for a period of 30 days in three reservoirs where both are not present naturally. Two of the reservoirs suffer from old industrial contamination and one is affected by untreated wastes. Twenty-four compounds were studied, among them trace elements Al, As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hg, Mn, Ni, Pb, Zn and organic priority substances: six polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) congeners and short-chain chlorinated paraffins (SCCPs). The trace element accumulation was significant after the exposition period in all studied stations. PBDEs and SCCPs were also accumulated up to two times more in the moss tissues. PBDEs in the mussels exceeded the environmental quality standard (EQS). The applied combined transplants, and especially the moss-bags, revealed severe contamination with heavy metals not detected by the water samples. The moss and the mussel followed a different model of trace element and PBDEs accumulation. The SCCPs levels were alarmingly high in all plant samples. The study confirmed PBDEs and SCCPs as bioaccumulative compounds and suggested that an EQS for SCCPs in biota needs to be established. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biomonitors in Water Quality Control)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Back to TopTop