Special Issue "River Ecological Restoration and Groundwater Artificial Recharge"

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Hydrology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 March 2022.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Yuanzheng Zhai
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
College of Water Sciences, Beijing Normal University, Beijing, China
Interests: environmental hydrogeology
Prof. Dr. Jin Wu
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Faculty of Architecture, Civil and Transportation Engineering, Beijing University of Technology, Beijing, China
Interests: ecological risk
Prof. Dr. Huaqing Wang
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Laboratory of Waves and Complex Media, UMR CNRS 6294, University of Le Havre Normandy, Le Havre, France
Interests: water security and management

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

There is a strong relationship between river and groundwater in nature. With the large-scale exploitation of riverside groundwater resources, this has caused adverse ecological impacts on the river and groundwater environment, such as water table depression, land subsidence, dried up rivers and even dry-up, and vegetation degradation. Using ecological replenishment of the river to increase groundwater recharge is an important method of managed aquifer recharge (MAR), which can effectively solve the problem of groundwater overextraction, increase river flow, and improve water quality. There are still many scientific and technical problems due to the diversity of replenishment water sources and the complexity of the infiltration process and hydrogeochemical reactions, although many such water replenishment practices have been carried out worldwide—for example, the clogging of the infiltration process, the groundwater quality change caused by unpredictable hydrogeochemical reactions, the underground fate of emerging pollutants introduced by replenishment water, the coupled model construction of river–groundwater under water replenishment condition, and so on. In addition, an evaluation of the effect of river ecological replenishment on groundwater resources recharge, risk assessment of land subsidence and urban safety, and impact assessment of the groundwater environment are also urgently needed.

Prof. Dr. Yuanzheng Zhai
Prof. Dr. Jin Wu
Prof. Dr. Huaqing Wang
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • managed aquifer recharge (MAR)
  • hydrogeochemistry in MAR
  • risk assessment
  • hydraulic clogging
  • land subsidence
  • coupled model
  • emerging contaminants

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Article
Uncertain Analysis of Fuzzy Evaluation Model for Water Resources Carrying Capacity: A Case Study in Zanhuang County, North China Plain
Water 2021, 13(20), 2804; https://doi.org/10.3390/w13202804 - 09 Oct 2021
Viewed by 216
Abstract
The scientific and accurate evaluation of water resources carrying capacity has good social, environmental and resource benefits. Reasonable selection of evaluation parameters is the key step to realize efficient and sustainable development of water resources. Taking Zanhuang County in the North China Plain [...] Read more.
The scientific and accurate evaluation of water resources carrying capacity has good social, environmental and resource benefits. Reasonable selection of evaluation parameters is the key step to realize efficient and sustainable development of water resources. Taking Zanhuang County in the North China Plain as the research area, this study selected fuzzy comprehensive evaluation models with different weights in the established evaluation index framework to explore the sources of uncertainty affecting the evaluation results of water resources carrying capacity. By using the sensitivity analysis method of index weight, the index with the biggest influence factor on the evaluation result is selected to reduce the uncertainty problems such as index redundancy and small correlation degree. The results show that the correlation and reliable of comprehensive evaluation value obtained by different weight methods is different. The evaluation result obtained by using the analytic hierarchy process is more relevant than the entropy weight method, and it is more consistent with the actual load-bearing situation. The study of sensitivity index shows that water area index is the biggest factor affecting the change of evaluation results, and water resources subsystem and socio-economic subsystem play a dominant role in the whole evaluation framework. The results show that strengthening the data quality control of index assignment and weight method is helpful to reduce the error of water resources carrying capacity evaluation. It can also provide scientific basis for the improvement of fuzzy evaluation model. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue River Ecological Restoration and Groundwater Artificial Recharge)
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Article
Hydrochemical Characteristics and Evolution of Groundwater in the Alluvial Plain (Anqing Section) of the Lower Yangtze River Basin: Multivariate Statistical and Inversion Model Analyses
Water 2021, 13(17), 2403; https://doi.org/10.3390/w13172403 - 31 Aug 2021
Viewed by 510
Abstract
The alluvial plain (Anqing section) of the lower reaches of the Yangtze River basin is facing increasing groundwater pollution, not only threatening the safety of drinking water for local residents and the sustainable development and utilization of groundwater resources but also the ecological [...] Read more.
The alluvial plain (Anqing section) of the lower reaches of the Yangtze River basin is facing increasing groundwater pollution, not only threatening the safety of drinking water for local residents and the sustainable development and utilization of groundwater resources but also the ecological security of the Yangtze River Basin. Therefore, it is necessary to conduct a preliminary analysis on the hydrochemical characteristics and evolution law of groundwater in this area. This study aimed to evaluate potential hydrogeochemical processes affecting the groundwater quality of this area by analyzing major ions in groundwater samples collected in 2019. Compositional relationships were determined to assess the origin of solutes and confirm the predominant hydrogeochemical processes controlling various ions in groundwater. Moreover, factors influencing groundwater quality were evaluated through the factor analysis method, and the control range of each influencing factor was analyzed using the distribution characteristics of factor scores. Finally, reverse hydrogeochemical simulation was carried out on typical profiles to quantitatively analyze the hydrochemical evolution process along flow paths. The Piper trilinear diagram revealed two prevalent hydrochemical facies, Ca-HCO3 type (phreatic water) and Ca-Na-HCO3 type (confined water) water. Based on the compositional relationships, the ions could be attributed to leaching (dissolution of rock salt, carbonate, and sulfate), evaporation and condensation, and cation exchange. Four influencing factors of phreatic water and confined water were extracted. The results of this study are expected to help understand the hydrochemical characteristics and evolution law of groundwater in the alluvial plain (Anqing section) of the lower Yangtze River basin for effective management and utilization of groundwater resources, and provide basic support for the ecological restoration of the Yangtze River Basin. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue River Ecological Restoration and Groundwater Artificial Recharge)
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Review

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Review
Further Discussion on the Influence Radius of a Pumping Well: A Parameter with Little Scientific and Practical Significance That Can Easily Be Misleading
Water 2021, 13(15), 2050; https://doi.org/10.3390/w13152050 - 28 Jul 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 529
Abstract
To facilitate understanding and calculation, hydrogeologists have introduced the influence radius. This parameter is now widely used, not only in the theoretical calculation and reasoning of well flow mechanics, but also in guiding production practice, and it has become an essential parameter in [...] Read more.
To facilitate understanding and calculation, hydrogeologists have introduced the influence radius. This parameter is now widely used, not only in the theoretical calculation and reasoning of well flow mechanics, but also in guiding production practice, and it has become an essential parameter in hydrogeology. However, the reasonableness of this parameter has always been disputed. This paper discusses the nature of the influence radius and the problems of its practical application based on mathematical reasoning and analogy starting from the Dupuit formula and Thiem formula. It is found that the influence radius is essentially the distance in the time–distance problem in physics; therefore, it is a function of time and velocity and is influenced by hydrogeological conditions and pumping conditions. Additionally, the influence radius is a variable and is essentially different from the hydrogeological parameters reflecting the natural properties of aquifers such as the porosity, specific yield, and hydraulic conductivity. Furthermore, the parameterized influence radius violates the continuity principle of fluids. In reality, there are no infinite horizontal aquifers, and most aquifers are replenished from external sources, which is very different from theory. The stable or seemingly stable groundwater level observed in practice is simply a coincidence that occurs under the influence of various practical factors, which cannot be considered to explain the rationality of applying this parameter in production calculations. Therefore, the influence radius cannot be used to evaluate the sustainable water supply capacity of aquifers, nor can it be used to guide the design of groundwater pollution remediation projects, the division of water source protection areas, and the scheme of riverbank filtration wells. Various ecological and environmental problems caused by groundwater exploitation are related to misleading information from the influence radius theory. Generally, the influence radius does not have scientific or practical significance, but it can easily be misleading, particularly for non-professionals. The influence radius should not be used in the sustainable development and protection of groundwater resources, let alone in theoretical models. From the perspective of regional overall planning, the calculation and evaluation of sustainable development and the utilization of groundwater resources should be investigated in a systematic manner. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue River Ecological Restoration and Groundwater Artificial Recharge)
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