Theory and Technology of Mine Water Disaster Prevention and Resource Utilization

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "New Sensors, New Technologies and Machine Learning in Water Sciences".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 25 August 2024 | Viewed by 2059

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
College of Energy Engineering, Xi’an University of Science and Technology, Xi’an 710054, China
Interests: water seepage; multi-field coupling; dynamic response; fracture characteristics; water bearing fracture mechanics; energy dissipation; disaster mechanism of wa-ter-rich coal and rock; disaster prevention

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Guest Editor
School of Resources and Safety Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044, China
Interests: mining; mine disaster monitoring; seismology; rock mechanics; machine learning

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Guest Editor
School of Geoscience and Technology, Southwest Petroleum University, Chengdu 610500, China
Interests: rock dynamics; water inrush mechanism; fluid–structure interaction; slip mecha-nism of water-bearing faults

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The complex hydrogeological conditions in deep mining areas, combined with large-scale and high-intensity mining activities, have triggered a series of mine water disasters and significant resource waste issues. The prevention of mine water hazards and the utilization of water resources are crucial for the safe operation of mines and the efficient utilization of mine water resources. Studying the occurrence mechanism of surrounding coal water disasters, advanced detection and disaster prevention can provide a theoretical basis and effective solutions for mine water treatment.

By studying fundamental mechanics theories of water-bearing coal rocks, technologies for the resource utilization of mine water, mechanisms of surrounding rock water disasters, and advanced technologies for the early warning and prevention of mine water disasters, an accurate prediction of and rapid response to mine water hazards can be achieved. This can minimize the losses caused by mine water disasters and effectively utilize water resources in mines. Therefore, this Special Issue aims to discuss the latest advances in the theory and technology of mine water hazard prevention and resource utilization.

All manuscripts related to the proposed topic are welcome. The Special Issue may include (without being limited to) the following themes:

(1) Fundamental mechanics of water-bearing coal and rock;

(2) Mechanism of surrounding rock water disaster;

(3) Theory and technology of mine water hazard detection;

(4) Theory and technology of monitoring, forewarning, prevention, and control of mine water disasters;

(5) Theory and technology of coordinated exploitation of coal–water dual resources;

(6) Resource utilization of mine water;

(7) Other related technology for mine water disaster prevention and resource utilization.

Given your competence in this area, we invite you to contribute a paper on the aforementioned subjects or others that may be relevant.

Dr. Helong Gu
Dr. Xueyi Shang
Dr. Huatao Zhao
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • mine water disasters
  • utilization of water resources
  • mine water treatment
  • fundamental mechanics theory of water-bearing coal rocks
  • surrounding rock water disasters
  • warning and prevention of mine water disasters

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

18 pages, 4636 KiB  
Article
Determination of Critical Damage Size of Inclined Waterproof Coal Pillar under Asymmetric Load
by Xingping Lai, Xiaoqian Yuchi, Helong Gu, Pengfei Shan and Wenhua Yang
Water 2024, 16(9), 1233; https://doi.org/10.3390/w16091233 - 25 Apr 2024
Viewed by 501
Abstract
Quantitative determination of the critical size of an inclined coal pillar in an old goaf water-affected area is of great significance for water damage prevention and safe mining. The critical size of the inclined waterproof coal pillar is derived by using mechanical analyses, [...] Read more.
Quantitative determination of the critical size of an inclined coal pillar in an old goaf water-affected area is of great significance for water damage prevention and safe mining. The critical size of the inclined waterproof coal pillar is derived by using mechanical analyses, numerical calculations, and field engineering practices to determine the stability of the waterproof coal pillar in the old goaf water-affected area of the 1303 working face of Dananhu No. 1 Mine in the Xinjiang region. Firstly, a force model of the inclined waterproof coal pillar was established to reveal the law that the critical size of the coal pillar increases with the increase in coal seam inclination under the action of asymmetric load. Then, numerical simulation was applied to reveal the dynamic evolution processes of plastic deformation–destabilization of the coal pillar under the influence of mining and single-side water pressure, and the critical size of the coal pillar in the study area was determined to be 19.09 m. Finally, measures such as pumping pressure relief and slurry reinforcement were adopted to reduce the deformation rate of the roadway on the side of the coal pillar, which ensured the stability of the waterproof coal pillar and the safe mining of the working face. Full article
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15 pages, 2403 KiB  
Article
A Connectivity Metrics-Based Approach for the Prediction of Stress-Dependent Fracture Permeability
by Qinglin Deng, Xueyi Shang and Ping He
Water 2024, 16(5), 697; https://doi.org/10.3390/w16050697 - 27 Feb 2024
Viewed by 625
Abstract
Rapid and accurate assessment of fracture permeability is critical for subsurface resource and energy development as well as rock engineering stability. Fracture permeability deviates from the classical cubic law under the effect of roughness, geological stress, as well as mining-induced stress. Conventional laboratory [...] Read more.
Rapid and accurate assessment of fracture permeability is critical for subsurface resource and energy development as well as rock engineering stability. Fracture permeability deviates from the classical cubic law under the effect of roughness, geological stress, as well as mining-induced stress. Conventional laboratory tests and numerical simulations are commonly costly and time-consuming, whereas the use of a connectivity metric based on percolation theory can quickly predict fracture permeability, but with relatively low accuracy. For this reason, we selected two static connectivity metrics with the highest and lowest prediction accuracy in previous studies, respectively, and proposed to revise and use them for fracture permeability estimation, considering the effect of isolated large-aperture regions within the fractures under increasing normal stress. Several hundred fractures with different fractal dimensions and mismatch lengths were numerically generated and deformed, and their permeability was calculated by the local cubic law (LCL). Based on the dataset, the connectivity metrics were counted using the revised approach, and the results show that, regardless of the connectivity metrics, the new model greatly improves the accuracy of permeability prediction compared to the pre-improved model, by at least 8% for different cutoff aperture thresholds. Full article
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