Special Issue "Microplastics and Microfibers in Water and Wastewater: A Grand Challenge"

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Aquatic Systems—Quality and Contamination".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 October 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Luiza Campos
Website
Guest Editor
University College London
Interests: water and wastewater treatment; green technologies; pharmaceuticals and personal care products; microplastics; sanitation systems
Dr. Rosa Busquets
Website
Guest Editor
Kingston University London
Interests: water; analysis; remediation; nanotechnology; emerging contaminants

Special Issue Information

There is general scientific agreement that microplastics are not only choking oceans and rivers, but that they are also in the tap water of cities around the world.

There is limited information available on the removal of microplastics and microfibers in water treatment. In addition, there is no evidence that the current water treatment process, particularly coagualtion-floccuation, sedimentation, sand filtration, and activated carbon adsorption can remove these particles.

We invite research and review papers on, but not limited to, the following research areas:

  • Detection methods for microplastics and microfibers in water/wastewater
  • Removal of microplastics and microfibers from drinking water
  • Removal of microplastics and microfibers from wastewater
  • Stability of microplastics and microfibers and subproducts of their degradation

This volume will include research from around the world to identify which technologies are effective, and what are the challenges and the vision towards improved water treatment and the characterisation of microplastics and microfibers.

Dr. Luiza Campos
Dr. Rosa Busquets
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Water is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • microplastics
  • microfibers
  • removal
  • drinking water
  • wastewater
  • detection methods

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Stormwater Detention Reservoirs: An Opportunity for Monitoring and a Potential Site to Prevent the Spread of Urban Microplastics
Water 2020, 12(7), 1994; https://doi.org/10.3390/w12071994 - 14 Jul 2020
Abstract
Stormwater runoff carries pollutants from urban areas to rivers and has the potential to be a main contributing source of microplastics (MPs) to the ecosystem. Stormwater detention reservoirs (SDRs) differ from ponds and lakes in that SDRs retain most particulate matter and they [...] Read more.
Stormwater runoff carries pollutants from urban areas to rivers and has the potential to be a main contributing source of microplastics (MPs) to the ecosystem. Stormwater detention reservoirs (SDRs) differ from ponds and lakes in that SDRs retain most particulate matter and they are emptied after storm events. This paper investigates the occurrence of MPs in the SDR of the Alto-Tietê catchment area, Itaim stream in Poá city, São Paulo, Brazil. The MPs found were classified in different categories: shapes (fragment, line/fibre, film/sheet and pellet); size (<0.5 mm, between 0.5 mm and 1 mm and >1 mm); and polymer composition. Results have shown that most of the MPs found in the samples are fragments (57%), followed by pellets (27%), fibres/lines (9%), and then films/sheets (6%). Small particles (<0.5 mm) represented 89% of the total MPs, and this category mainly included fragments (62%) and pellets (30%). MPs were found in a vast variety of shapes and colours, which shows a likely variety of sources. Besides the occurrence of MPs in the stormwater samples, the potential of SDRs as a first sanitary barrier to retain MPs before they reach the ecosystem has been speculated. Full article
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Microplastics altered lake phytoplankton composition

Kiyoko Yokota and Marissa Mehlrose

 

Can zooplankton be entangled by microfibers in the marine environment? : Laboratory studies

Jung-Hoon Kang

Title: Microplastics in stormwater detention reservoir of the Alto-Tietê River catchment in Poá, São Paulo Metropolitan Area
Authors: Rodrigo Braga Moruzzi; Lais Galileu Speranza; Fabiano Tomazini da Conceição; Suely Teodoro; Rosa Busquets; Luiza Cintra Camp
Affiliation: Universidade Estadual Paulista
Abstract: Abstract: Stormwater carries many of the pollutants from urban areas to rivers, and has a potential to be a main entrance for microplastic (MP) in the ecosystem. Stormwater detention reservoirs differ from ponds and lakes, as it is emptied after a storm event and so all classes of densities of particulate matter are retained in there. This paper investigates the occurrence of MPs in stormwater reservoir set at one of Sao Paulo, Brazil catchment area. The MPs found were classified in different categories (fragment, line/fibre, film/sheet and pellet), size (<0.5mm, between 0.5 mm and 1 mm and > 1mm) and physical properties (texture, colour and flexibility) and composition with FT-IR and Raman spectroscopy. Results have shown that most of MP found in the samples are fragments (57%) followed by pellets (27%), fibres/lines (9%) and then films/sheets (6%). Small particles (<0.5 mm) represented 89% of the total MPs, and this category included mainly formed by fragments (62%) and pellets (30%). Fragments were identified as polystyrene (PS), usually used for the production of food packaging, toys, car parts and electronics.

Title: Microplastics in Drinking Water and Their Removal by Coagulation-Flocculation and sedimentation
Authors: Chaoran Li; Rosa Busquets; John Gregory; Luiza C. Campos
Affiliation: University College London
Abstract: Microplastics (MPs) are plastic particles or fibres (<5mm). They have ubiquitous presence in the water environment and have been found even in tap water and wastewater effluents. There is an urgent need for evaluating their behaviour in drinking water treatment processes. Optimising of coagulation-flocculation and sedimentation steps, which are conventionally used to decrease water turbidity, can be an opportunity for removing MPs more efficiently. This is preliminary study that aims to evaluate the effectivity of coagulation-flocculation and sedimentation in the removal of MPs. We focused on 100 μm polystyrene MPs and used the conventional coagulant aluminium sulphate. The dose of coagulant, effect of pH and stirring speed have been investigated for MPs removal and a kinetic model showing floc breakage has been built. The most effective conditions for removing MPs from water were 3.4 mg/L of coagulant (pH 5); flocculation time of 7 min and sedimentation time of 30 min. The removal of MPs achieved under the optimal conditions was >90%. Coagulation-flocculation and sedimentation are therefore key steps in the removal of MPs.

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