Special Issue "Non-Strabismic Binocular and Accommodative Visual Disorders: Diagnosis and Treatment"

A special issue of Vision (ISSN 2411-5150).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 August 2022.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. David Piñero
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Optics, Pharmacology and Anatomy, University of Alicante, 03690 Alicante, Spain
Interests: cornea; refractive surgery; cataract; ocular surface; ocular imaging
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Ainhoa Molina-Martín
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Optics, Pharmacology and Anatomy, University of Alicante, 03690 Alicante, Spain
Interests: optometry; binocular vision; accommodation; visual perception; ocular fixation

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Non-strabismic binocular and visual disorders are conditions that can lead to significant symptomatology and difficulties for performing common daily life activities, especially those related to intermediate and near vision. These disorders include conditions such as insufficiency and excess of accommodation, convergence insufficiency, divergence excess or spasm of accommodation. More research is needed to standardize the diagnostic criteria of such conditions as well as the most adequate therapeutic approach in each case, considering all potential options (from pharmacological treatment to visual training)

This Special Issue invites articles or reviews focused on the clinical characterization of non-strabismic binocular vision and accommodation disorders as well as case series or clinical trials focused on the analysis of the outcomes with different type of therapeutic approaches

Dr. Ainhoa Molina-Martín
Prof. Dr. David Piñero
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Vision is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • binocular vision
  • accommodation
  • vision therapy
  • convergence
  • divergence
  • convergence insufficiency
  • divergence excess
  • exophoria
  • esophoria
  • fusional vergence
  • insufficiency of accommodation

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Article
Objective and Subjective Evaluation of Saccadic Eye Movements in Healthy Children and Children with Neurodevelopmental Disorders: A Pilot Study
Vision 2021, 5(2), 28; https://doi.org/10.3390/vision5020028 - 07 Jun 2021
Viewed by 875
Abstract
The objective of this study was to characterize saccades in children with neurodevelopmental disorders (NDDG, 17 children, age: 7–12 years) and compare them with a control group (CG, 15 children, age: 7–12 years), comparing the outcomes obtained with a subjective score system (Northeastern [...] Read more.
The objective of this study was to characterize saccades in children with neurodevelopmental disorders (NDDG, 17 children, age: 7–12 years) and compare them with a control group (CG, 15 children, age: 7–12 years), comparing the outcomes obtained with a subjective score system (Northeastern State University College of Optometry’s Oculomotor test, NSUCO) with the objective analysis obtained through a commercially available Eye Tracker (Tobii Eye X, Tobii, Stockholm, Sweden) and a specialized software analysis (Thomson Software Solutions, Welham Green, UK). Children from the NDDG obtained significantly lower NSUCO scores (p < 0.001) compared with CG. Concerning eye tracking analyses, we found a significantly higher number of hypometric saccades in NDGG (p ≤ 0.044). Likewise, we found a significantly higher percentage of regressions in the NDDG for a time interval of presentation of stimuli of 1 s (p = 0.012). Significant correlations were found between different NSUCO scores and percentage of regressions, number of saccades completed and number of hypometric saccades. The presence of hypometric saccades and regressions seems to be a differential characteristic sign of children with neurodevelopmental disorders that can be detected using an objective eye tracking analysis, but also using the subjective test NSUCO that can be easily implemented in all clinical settings. Full article
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Review

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Review
Current Management of Amblyopia with New Technologies for Binocular Treatment
Vision 2021, 5(2), 31; https://doi.org/10.3390/vision5020031 - 10 Jun 2021
Viewed by 933
Abstract
Amblyopia is the most common cause of monocular poor vision affecting up to 3.7% of the global population. Classically, the first step in treatment has been optical correction, followed by patching and/or pharmacological treatment. However, this is an evolving scenario, since researchers and [...] Read more.
Amblyopia is the most common cause of monocular poor vision affecting up to 3.7% of the global population. Classically, the first step in treatment has been optical correction, followed by patching and/or pharmacological treatment. However, this is an evolving scenario, since researchers and clinicians are interested in new binocular treatments due to the increasing development of new technologies. In this article main, current binocular treatments as Dig Rush, falling blocks, I-BiT, Occlu-tab, Vivid Vision, and movies are reviewed for binocular amblyopia management. Full article
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