Special Issue "Avian Respiratory Viruses, Volume II"

A special issue of Viruses (ISSN 1999-4915). This special issue belongs to the section "Animal Viruses".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 January 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Faizal Careem
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Guest Editor

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The vast majority of disease-causing avian viruses use respiratory mucosa for host entry. Although there are a number of effective disease prevention strategies in place on poultry farms, viruses such as avian influenza virus, Newcastle disease virus, infectious bronchitis virus, and infectious laryngotracheitis virus continue to pose major constraints for the sustainability of the poultry industry globally. With a view of the economic and public health importance of avian respiratory viral infections, the focus of this Special Issue will be on the most recent progress in the research of these viral infections, including on evolution of the virus, pathogenesis, virus–host interactions, vaccine development, and the development of novel control measures.

Prof. Dr. Faizal Careem
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

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Keywords

  • avian influenza virus
  • Newcastle disease virus
  • infectious bronchitis virus
  • infectious laryngotracheitis virus
  • virus evolution
  • pathogenesis
  • virus–host interaction
  • vaccine
  • innate immune response
  • adaptive immune response
  • adjuvant
  • avian

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Comparative Protective Efficacies of Novel Avian Paramyxovirus-Vectored Vaccines against Virulent Infectious Bronchitis Virus in Chickens
Viruses 2020, 12(7), 697; https://doi.org/10.3390/v12070697 - 28 Jun 2020
Abstract
Viral vectored vaccines are desirable alternatives for conventional infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) vaccines. We have recently shown that a recombinant Newcastle disease virus (rNDV) strain LaSota expressing the spike (S) protein of IBV strain Mass-41 (rLaSota/IBV-S) was a promising vaccine candidate for IBV. [...] Read more.
Viral vectored vaccines are desirable alternatives for conventional infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) vaccines. We have recently shown that a recombinant Newcastle disease virus (rNDV) strain LaSota expressing the spike (S) protein of IBV strain Mass-41 (rLaSota/IBV-S) was a promising vaccine candidate for IBV. Here we evaluated a novel chimeric rNDV/avian paramyxovirus serotype 2 (rNDV/APMV-2) as a vaccine vector against IBV. The rNDV/APMV-2 vector was chosen because it is much safer than the rNDV strain LaSota vector, particularly for young chicks and chicken embryos. In order to determine the effectiveness of this vector, a recombinant rNDV/APMV-2 expressing the S protein of IBV strain Mass-41 (rNDV/APMV-2/IBV-S) was constructed. The protective efficacy of this vector vaccine was compared to that of the rNDV vector vaccine. In one study, groups of one-day-old specific-pathogenic-free (SPF) chickens were immunized with rLaSota/IBV-S and rNDV/APMV-2/IBV-S and challenged four weeks later with the homologous highly virulent IBV strain Mass-41. In another study, groups of broiler chickens were single (at day one or three weeks of age) or prime-boost (prime at day one and boost at three weeks of age) immunized with rLaSota/IBV-S and/or rNDV-APMV-2/IBV-S. At weeks six of age, chickens were challenged with a highly virulent IBV strain Mass-41. Our challenge study showed that novel rNDV/APMV-2/IBV-S provided similar protection as rLaSota/IBV-S in SPF chickens. However, compared to prime-boost immunization of chickens with chimeric rNDV/APMV-2, rLaSota/IBV-S and/or a live IBV vaccine, single immunization of chickens with rLaSota/IBV-S, or live IBV vaccine provided better protection against IBV. In conclusion, we have developed the novel rNDV/APMV-2 vector expressing S protein of IBV that can be a safer vaccine against IB in chickens. Our results also suggest a single immunization with a LaSota vectored IBV vaccine candidate provides better protection than prime-boost immunization regimens. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Avian Respiratory Viruses, Volume II)
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