Special Issue "RNA Interference (RNAi) for Antiviral Therapy"

A special issue of Viruses (ISSN 1999-4915). This special issue belongs to the section "Antivirals & Vaccines".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Kenneth Lundstrom
E-Mail
Guest Editor
PanTherapeutics, Rue des Remparts 4, CH-1095 Lutry, Switzerland
Interests: viral gene therapy; viral vaccines; gene expression using viral vectors; structural biology; epigenetics; nutrigenomics
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The discovery of RNA interference (RNAi) has opened up completely new possibilities in research and therapeutic applications. In this context, small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) and micro-RNAs (miRNAs) are of particular interest. The attraction of therapeutic RNAi relates to its reversible nature, whereby an effective gene silencing the targeted RNA is degraded by a sequence-specific process, leaving no risk of prolonged effect after the termination of treatment. The delivery of RNAi has been considered to be one of the major obstacles for therapeutic efficacy and safety. For this reason, both non-viral and viral delivery methods for RNAi have been developed. The global threat of emerging lethal viral infectious diseases reaching epidemic levels has triggered the development of RNAi-based therapeutics. For example, RNAi approaches have been executed or planned for influenza virus, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis virus, Ebola virus, and Dengue virus. Clinical trials have been conducted for respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), hepatitis B virus (HBV), HIV, and Ebola virus. This Special Issue on RNAi for Antiviral Therapy aims at reviewing the recent progress in the field, from vector engineering and delivery technologies to clinical trials.

Dr. Kenneth Lundstrom
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Viruses is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • target identification
  • vector engineering
  • delivery
  • preclinical studies
  • clinical trials

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
MicroRNA-7 Inhibits Rotavirus Replication by Targeting Viral NSP5 In Vivo and In Vitro
Viruses 2020, 12(2), 209; https://doi.org/10.3390/v12020209 - 13 Feb 2020
Abstract
Rotavirus (RV) is the major causes of severe diarrhea in infants and young children under five years of age. There are no effective drugs for the treatment of rotavirus in addition to preventive live attenuated vaccine. Recent evidence demonstrates that microRNAs (miRNAs) can [...] Read more.
Rotavirus (RV) is the major causes of severe diarrhea in infants and young children under five years of age. There are no effective drugs for the treatment of rotavirus in addition to preventive live attenuated vaccine. Recent evidence demonstrates that microRNAs (miRNAs) can affect RNA virus replication. However, the antiviral effect of miRNAs during rotavirus replication are largely unknown. Here, we determined that miR-7 is upregulated during RV replication and that it targets the RV NSP5 (Nonstructural protein 5). Results suggested that miR-7 affected viroplasm formation and inhibited RV replication by down-regulating RV NSP5 expression. Up-regulation of miR-7 expression is a common regulation method of different G-type RV-infected host cells. Then, we further revealed the antiviral effect of miR-7 in diarrhea suckling mice model. MiR-7 is able to inhibit rotavirus replication in vitro and in vivo. These data provide that understanding the role of cellular miR-7 during rotaviral replication may help in the identification of novel therapeutic small RNA molecule drug for anti-rotavirus. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue RNA Interference (RNAi) for Antiviral Therapy)
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