Allergies in Animals and Humans

A special issue of Veterinary Sciences (ISSN 2306-7381).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 May 2017) | Viewed by 62435

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Wellington Asthma Research Group, University of Otago, Wellington 6242, New Zealand
Interests: asthma; allergy; indoor environment; biomarkers; epidemiology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Allergy to inhalant and food allergens affects many patients worldwide. Various animal species are also known to suffer from allergic diseases, such as dogs with atopic dermatitis due to sensitization to house dust mites. Research into elucidating allergy mechanisms and development of new therapies in humans has been possible by utilizing animal models. This Special Issue of Veterinary Sciences on “Allergies in Animals and Humans” invites original articles and brief communications, as well as reviews, especially on how allergic diseases in animals can shed light on these in humans, or visa versa. Hopefully, this will lead to closer collaboration between researchers in the veterinary and medical sciences to tackle this important disorder.

Associate Professor Rob Siebers
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

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Keywords

  • Allergy
  • Animals
  • Human
  • Mechanisms
  • Epidemiology
  • allergic diseases
  • models

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Editorial

Jump to: Research, Review

2 pages, 124 KiB  
Editorial
Allergies in Animals and Humans
by Robert Siebers
Vet. Sci. 2018, 5(1), 5; https://doi.org/10.3390/vetsci5010005 - 15 Jan 2018
Viewed by 3283
Abstract
Allergy to inhalant and food allergens affects many patients worldwide [...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Allergies in Animals and Humans)

Research

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17 pages, 243 KiB  
Article
A Pilot Qualitative Investigation of Stakeholders’ Experiences and Opinions of Equine Insect Bite Hypersensitivity in England
by Hannah R. Lomas and Philip A. Robinson
Vet. Sci. 2018, 5(1), 3; https://doi.org/10.3390/vetsci5010003 - 9 Jan 2018
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 5707
Abstract
Equine insect bite hypersensitivity (IBH), commonly known as sweet itch or summer eczema, is a frustrating recurrent skin disease in the equine industry involving an immune reaction to the bites of Culicoides spp. midges. To investigate the impact of IBH in the field, [...] Read more.
Equine insect bite hypersensitivity (IBH), commonly known as sweet itch or summer eczema, is a frustrating recurrent skin disease in the equine industry involving an immune reaction to the bites of Culicoides spp. midges. To investigate the impact of IBH in the field, an exploratory pilot study was conducted with equine stakeholders in one region of central England. Nine semi-structured, face-to-face interviews were conducted with horse owners and an equine veterinarian. The aim was to gain an understanding of experiences with IBH, and to gauge opinions on the value of the various management strategies horse owners use to control IBH. Awareness of IBH was generally high, particularly in those individuals who had previous experience with the condition. Those with previous experience of IBH commented on the significant effect on daily routines, and the associated cost implications. Most participants supported an integrated approach to hypersensitivity management, and this most commonly involved a combination of physical barriers and chemical repellents, but sometimes included feed supplementation. Overall, attitudes towards IBH suggested that the condition is a notable welfare and economic concern for stakeholders, but veterinary involvement tended to only be in more severe cases. Further research is required in the future to improve understanding, management and potential treatment of this condition. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Allergies in Animals and Humans)

Review

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405 KiB  
Review
Respiratory Allergens from Furred Mammals: Environmental and Occupational Exposure
by Eva Zahradnik and Monika Raulf
Vet. Sci. 2017, 4(3), 38; https://doi.org/10.3390/vetsci4030038 - 4 Aug 2017
Cited by 48 | Viewed by 6806
Abstract
Furry mammals kept as pets, farm and laboratory animals are important allergen sources. The prevalence of sensitization to furred mammals appears to be increasing worldwide. Several mammalian allergens from diverse species are well characterized with regard to their molecular structure and immunogenicity, and [...] Read more.
Furry mammals kept as pets, farm and laboratory animals are important allergen sources. The prevalence of sensitization to furred mammals appears to be increasing worldwide. Several mammalian allergens from diverse species are well characterized with regard to their molecular structure and immunogenicity, and some are already available for component-resolved allergy diagnostics. The distribution of various mammalian allergens has been extensively studied during the past few decades. Animal allergens were found to be ubiquitous in the human environment, even in places where no animals reside, with concentrations differing considerably between locations and geographical regions. This review presents an overview of identified mammalian respiratory allergens classified according to protein families, and compiles the results of allergen exposure assessment studies conducted in different public and occupational environments. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Allergies in Animals and Humans)
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1531 KiB  
Review
Atopic Dermatitis in Animals and People: An Update and Comparative Review
by Rosanna Marsella and Anna De Benedetto
Vet. Sci. 2017, 4(3), 37; https://doi.org/10.3390/vetsci4030037 - 26 Jul 2017
Cited by 85 | Viewed by 18002
Abstract
Atopic dermatitis is an extremely common, pruritic, and frustrating disease to treat in both people and animals. Atopic dermatitis is multifactorial and results from complex interactions between genetic and environmental factors. Much progress has been done in recent years in terms of understanding [...] Read more.
Atopic dermatitis is an extremely common, pruritic, and frustrating disease to treat in both people and animals. Atopic dermatitis is multifactorial and results from complex interactions between genetic and environmental factors. Much progress has been done in recent years in terms of understanding the complex pathogenesis of this clinical syndrome and the identification of new treatments. As we learn more about it, we appreciate the striking similarities that exist in the clinical manifestations of this disease across species. Both in animals and people, atopic disease is becoming increasingly common and important similarities exist in terms of immunologic aberrations and the propensity for allergic sensitization. The purpose of this review is to highlight the most recent views on atopic dermatitis in both domestic species and in people emphasizing the similarities and the differences. A comparative approach can be beneficial in understanding the natural course of this disease and the variable response to existing therapies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Allergies in Animals and Humans)
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868 KiB  
Review
Cutaneous Hypersensitivity Dermatoses in the Feline Patient: A Review of Allergic Skin Disease in Cats
by Alison Diesel
Vet. Sci. 2017, 4(2), 25; https://doi.org/10.3390/vetsci4020025 - 9 May 2017
Cited by 23 | Viewed by 21563
Abstract
Feline allergic skin disease presents a unique set of challenges to the veterinary practitioner. Although there is some similarity to what is seen in the allergic canine patient, cutaneous hypersensitivity dermatoses in cats can manifest with strikingly different clinical signs, treatment options and [...] Read more.
Feline allergic skin disease presents a unique set of challenges to the veterinary practitioner. Although there is some similarity to what is seen in the allergic canine patient, cutaneous hypersensitivity dermatoses in cats can manifest with strikingly different clinical signs, treatment options and outcomes, and secondary complications/disease entities. Additionally, less is known about the pathogenesis of feline allergic skin diseases, particularly “feline atopic syndrome” when compared to dogs or people. This article aims to review what is currently known in regards to allergic skin disease in the feline patient, with focus on non-flea, non-food hypersensitivity dermatitis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Allergies in Animals and Humans)
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820 KiB  
Review
In Vitro Research Tools in the Field of Human Immediate Drug Hypersensitivity and Their Present Use in Small Animal Veterinary Medicine
by Sidonie N. Lavergne
Vet. Sci. 2017, 4(1), 1; https://doi.org/10.3390/vetsci4010001 - 22 Dec 2016
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 6302
Abstract
Drug hypersensitivity reactions (DHR) are immune-mediated idiosyncratic adverse drug events. Type I DHR are often referred to as “immediate” and involve B lymphocyte-secreted IgE that bind to the membrane of basophils and mast cells, inducing their degranulation. This review presents various in vitro [...] Read more.
Drug hypersensitivity reactions (DHR) are immune-mediated idiosyncratic adverse drug events. Type I DHR are often referred to as “immediate” and involve B lymphocyte-secreted IgE that bind to the membrane of basophils and mast cells, inducing their degranulation. This review presents various in vitro tests that were developed in the field of human type I HS and implemented as clinical diagnostic tools in human cases of immediate DHR. The respective strengths and weaknesses of each test will be discussed in parallel of validation data such as specificity and sensitivity whenever available. Some of them have also been used as diagnostic tools in veterinary medicine, but not in cases of immediate DHR. Most of these diagnostic tools can be categorized into humoral and cellular tests. The former tests measure serum concentrations of factors, such as histamine, tryptase, and drug-specific IgE. The latter assays quantify markers of drug-induced basophil activation or drug-specific lymphocyte proliferation. Pharmacogenetic markers have also been investigated in immediate DHR, but not as extensively as in non-immediate ones. Throughout, practical aspects and limitations of the tests, as well as sensitivity and specificity parameters, will be presented. In addition, the experience of veterinary medicine with these diagnostic tools will be summarized. However, to date, none of them has ever been reported in a veterinary case of type I DHR. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Allergies in Animals and Humans)
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