Special Issue "Italian Society of the Veterinary Sciences SISVet 2019"

A special issue of Veterinary Sciences (ISSN 2306-7381).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 December 2019).

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Maria Laura Bacci
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Veterinary Medical Sciences, University of Bologna, 40064 Ozzano dell’Emilia (BO), Italy
Interests: swine; physiology; endocrinology; reproduction; welfare; reproductive biotechnology; transgenesis

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We are happy to invite you to the SISVet 2019 Congress that is the biggest conference in Italy dedicated to veterinary science, which has been held for over 72 years. The conference will be held 19-22 June 2019 in Olbia. The conference will include the participation of the following societoes: SOFIVET Italian Society of Veterinary Physiology, SICV Italian Society of Veterinary Surgery, SIRA Italian Society of Animal Reproduction, AIPVET Italian Association of Veterinary Pathology, ARNA, Association of Researchers Nutrition and Food, ANIV Italian Association of Veterinary Infectivologists, RNIV, and the National Network of Veterinary Immunology.

We are particularly interested in articles related to the society involved and to the central theme of the convention, which will be antimicrobial resistance in veterinary implications, from pharmacological, infectious, clinical, zootechnical, pathological, and public health aspects. Naturally, all topics related to veterinary sciences are welcome. The novelty of this year is represented by the ARNA that will propose for its scientific session the theme: "Milk in the Diet of the Future".

On behalf of the organizing committee, we welcome your contribution.

Prof. Maria Laura Bacci
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Veterinary Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Anatomy and physiology
  • Infectious and parasitic diseases
  • Food safety
  • Pharmacology and toxicology
  • Clinical medicine
  • Surgery and Ostetrics
  • Equine medicine
  • Pathology

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Schirmer Tear Test Value and Corneal Lesions’ Incidence during General Anesthesia for Non-Ophthalmic Surgery in Non-Brachycephalic Dogs: A Pilot Study Comparing Three Different Lubricant Eye Drop Formulations
Vet. Sci. 2020, 7(1), 25; https://doi.org/10.3390/vetsci7010025 - 18 Feb 2020
Abstract
Aim of this blinded, prospective, randomized clinical study was to compare three different lubricant eye drops (LED) in healthy adult dogs undergoing general anaesthesia (GA) for non-ophthalmic surgery. Tear production rate was monitored by means of Schirmer tear test-1 (STT-1), and incidence of [...] Read more.
Aim of this blinded, prospective, randomized clinical study was to compare three different lubricant eye drops (LED) in healthy adult dogs undergoing general anaesthesia (GA) for non-ophthalmic surgery. Tear production rate was monitored by means of Schirmer tear test-1 (STT-1), and incidence of post-operative corneal abrasions/ulcerations was detected by corneal staining. A complete ophthalmic examination was performed before premedication, at extubation time and 24 h after GA in twenty-five non-brachycephalic dogs (fifty eyes) undergoing elective orthopaedic or spinal surgery procedures. Dogs were randomly allocated to one of three groups receiving as prophylactic LED either carmellose sodium (GC), or 1% hyaluronic acid (GH), or 0.25% hyaluronic acid (GL). In each eye STT-1 was repeated every hour during GA, before instilling one drop of the assigned LED. In all groups STT-1 values drastically decreased during GA, while 24 h later nine eyes (18%) had STT-1 values lower than 15 mm/minute. All of the three formulations tested were fully effective in preventing corneal ulceration (0% in all groups), while 10% of eyes reported superficial de-epithelialization. Fluorescein staining demonstrated that hourly prophylactic LED application prevented exposure keratopathy during general anesthesia in 90% of the eyes in non-brachycephalic dogs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Italian Society of the Veterinary Sciences SISVet 2019)
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Open AccessArticle
Sonographic Evaluation of Medial Iliac Lymph Nodes-to-Aorta Ratio in Dogs
Vet. Sci. 2020, 7(1), 22; https://doi.org/10.3390/vetsci7010022 - 11 Feb 2020
Abstract
Medial iliac lymph nodes drain many districts and are easy to identify during an ultrasound examination of the abdomen. Since there are no reference values for their size in healthy dogs, the aim of this work was to evaluate the size of the [...] Read more.
Medial iliac lymph nodes drain many districts and are easy to identify during an ultrasound examination of the abdomen. Since there are no reference values for their size in healthy dogs, the aim of this work was to evaluate the size of the medial iliac lymph nodes by using a ratio with the aortic diameter and find a reference range. The population was divided into group A (healthy dogs) and group B, with diseases of the medial iliac lymph nodes. The ratio of length, height and thickness of the medial iliac lymph nodes with the diameter of the aorta were calculated and underwent statistical analysis, p < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Sixty-three patients were enrolled in group A, and 37 in group B. Significant differences were found between the ratio of sick and healthy patients and neoplastic and healthy patients. No significant difference was found between healthy and inflammatory patients. The best cut-off value to discriminate sick and healthy patients was 0.57, with a sensitivity of 78% and a specificity of 71%. The cut-off value of neoplastic and healthy patients was 0.69, with a sensitivity of 89.47% and a specificity of 84.13%. This value is highly predictive of neoplasia. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Italian Society of the Veterinary Sciences SISVet 2019)
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Open AccessArticle
Transverse Right Ventricle Strain and Strain Rate Assessed by 2-Dimensional Speckle Tracking Echocardiography in Dogs with Pulmonary Hypertension
Vet. Sci. 2020, 7(1), 19; https://doi.org/10.3390/vetsci7010019 - 07 Feb 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
Right ventricular (RV) strain analysis using 2-dimensional speckle tracking echocardiography (2D STE) permits practitioners to assess regional and global deformation of the myocardium. Recently, assessment of the longitudinal right ventricle (RV) strain and strain rate using 2D STE has been reported in dogs. [...] Read more.
Right ventricular (RV) strain analysis using 2-dimensional speckle tracking echocardiography (2D STE) permits practitioners to assess regional and global deformation of the myocardium. Recently, assessment of the longitudinal right ventricle (RV) strain and strain rate using 2D STE has been reported in dogs. Although longitudinal deformation is the dominant component of the RV systole, RV myocardial fibers of the superficial layer are oriented circumferentially and these contribute to the RV pump function (radial deformation). Because this strain component has not been investigated in dogs, we have assessed radial RV strain and strain rate using 2D STE in healthy dogs and dogs with pulmonary hypertension (PH). We have recruited 74 dogs (40 healthy dogs and 34 dogs with PH) in which we have analyzed radial RV free wall strain and strain rate using XstrainTM software. We have used the left apical 4-chamber view optimized for the RV for analysis of the radial strain and strain rate variables (XstrainTM software denoted radial strain as “transverse”). Seven dogs were excluded during the analysis for low quality images. Transverse strain and strain rate obtained in healthy dogs showed no relationship with heart rate, body weight or age (r2 < 0.09 and p > 0.05 for all variables). Moreover, no relationship between transverse strain/strain rate variables and left atrial-to-aortic ratios was observed (r2 < 0.06 and p = 0.2, for both). Transverse strain and strain rate obtained in dogs with PH, showed weak negative relationships with tricuspid regurgitation velocity (r2 < 0.25 and p = 0.006, for both). Transverse RV strain and strain rate using 2D STE is feasible in most dogs and decrease with worsening of the PH, but these advanced echocardiographic indices do not help in identifying dogs with PH. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Italian Society of the Veterinary Sciences SISVet 2019)
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Open AccessArticle
Assessment of Ochratoxin A Exposure in Ornamental and Self-Consumption Backyard Chickens
Vet. Sci. 2020, 7(1), 18; https://doi.org/10.3390/vetsci7010018 - 07 Feb 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
Ochratoxin A (OTA) is a mycotoxin that may be present in various food and feed of plant and animal origin, including chicken meat. In Italy, backyard poultry farming is rather widespread. Animals are raised for meat, eggs and for ornamental purpose, and they [...] Read more.
Ochratoxin A (OTA) is a mycotoxin that may be present in various food and feed of plant and animal origin, including chicken meat. In Italy, backyard poultry farming is rather widespread. Animals are raised for meat, eggs and for ornamental purpose, and they are often fed with home-made diets not subject to official controls. The purpose of this study was to evaluate exposure of ornamental and backyard chickens to OTA using biliary ochratoxin A as a biomarker. Therefore, bile samples, in addition to kidney, liver and muscle, were collected from 102 chickens reared in 16 farms located in 6 Italian regions. High-performance liquid chromatography method and fluorimetric detection (HPLC-FLD) analysis were carried out firstly on bile from all animals, and OTA was detected in 12 chickens (concentration range 3.83–170.42 µg/L). Subsequently, the kidneys of these chickens were also analysed, and the mycotoxin was not detected. The analytical detection limits (LODs) of OTA in bile and kidney were 2.1 µg/L and 0.1 µg/kg, respectively. In conclusion, these animals were exposed to OTA but their meat can be considered safe, given that this mycotoxin, if present, concentrates highest in kidneys. Biliary ochratoxin A confirms its use as a valid biomarker to assess exposure of poultry to OTA. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Italian Society of the Veterinary Sciences SISVet 2019)
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Open AccessArticle
Improvement of Embryo Recovery in Holstein Cows Treated by Intra-Ovarian Platelet Rich Plasma before Superovulation
Vet. Sci. 2020, 7(1), 16; https://doi.org/10.3390/vetsci7010016 - 01 Feb 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
The current research was designed to evaluate if intra-ovarian administration of autologous platelet rich plasma (PRP) before superovulation could increase the number of follicles responsive to gonadotropin treatment in order to improve embryo recovery in donor cows. Eight Holstein-Friesian cows of proven fertility [...] Read more.
The current research was designed to evaluate if intra-ovarian administration of autologous platelet rich plasma (PRP) before superovulation could increase the number of follicles responsive to gonadotropin treatment in order to improve embryo recovery in donor cows. Eight Holstein-Friesian cows of proven fertility were employed. After estrous synchronization, at the 18th day of diestrous, the right ovary of each cow was left untreated and served as control while the left ovary was inoculated with 5 mL of PRP. Cows were left to spontaneously return to estrous, and nine days later, a standard superovulation was initiated for every cow. Seven days after artificial insemination (AI), putative embryos were collected by flushing the right and left uterine horns separately. All statistics were calculated by ANOVA. The mean number of follicles, evaluated by transrectal ultrasound scanning, did not statistically differ before PRP treatment between right (control) and left (treated) ovaries (9.18 ± 1.35 and 7.32 ± 1.67, p = 0.28, respectively) as well as at 48 h after PRP injection (7.67 ± 2.52 and 8.00 ± 2.00, p = 0.73, respectively). A statistical (p = 0.023) difference was found in the average number of follicles at the last gonadotropin injection between control and treated ovaries (11.33 ± 2.89 and 20.00 ± 9.17, respectively). The statistically different (p = 0.0037) number of grade 1-2 blastocysts harvested from the uterine horn ipsilateral to control ovaries in comparison to that collected from the treated ones (6.63 ± 2.92 and 14.75 ± 5.92, respectively) suggests that intra-ovarian injection of PRP before superovulation could exert beneficial effects both in latent follicle growth and in vivo embryo production. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Italian Society of the Veterinary Sciences SISVet 2019)
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Open AccessArticle
In Vitro Antibacterial Activity of Biological-Derived Silver Nanoparticles: Preliminary Data
Vet. Sci. 2020, 7(1), 12; https://doi.org/10.3390/vetsci7010012 - 23 Jan 2020
Abstract
Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are promising alternatives to antibiotics. The aims of this study were to produce AgNPs using two biological methods and determine their antibacterial activity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus pseudintermedius. AgNPs were biosynthesized from an infusion of Curcuma longa (turmeric) [...] Read more.
Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are promising alternatives to antibiotics. The aims of this study were to produce AgNPs using two biological methods and determine their antibacterial activity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus pseudintermedius. AgNPs were biosynthesized from an infusion of Curcuma longa (turmeric) and the culture supernatant of E. coli. Characterization was achieved by ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy and by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). The antibacterial properties of NPs from C. longa (ClAgNPs) and E. coli (EcAgNPs), alone and in combination with carbenicillin and ampicillin, were investigated through the Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion assay and the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC). Dimensions of NPs ranged from 11.107 ± 2.705 nm (ClAgNPs) to 27.282 ± 2.68 nm (EcAgNPs). Kirby-Bauer and MIC assays showed great antibacterial abilities for both NPs alone and in combination with antibiotics. EcAgNPs alone showed the most powerful antibacterial activities, resulting in MIC values ranging from 0.438 ± 0.18 µM (P. aeruginosa) to 3.75 ± 3.65 µM (S. pseudintermedius) compared to those of ClAgNPs: 71.8 ± 0 µM (P. aeruginosa) and 143.7 ± 0 µM (S. pseudintermedius). The antibiofilm abilities were strain-dependent, but no statistical differences were found between the two NPs. These results suggest the antibacterial potential of AgNPs for the treatment of infectious diseases. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Italian Society of the Veterinary Sciences SISVet 2019)
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