Special Issue "Travel and Tropical Medicine"

A special issue of Tropical Medicine and Infectious Disease (ISSN 2414-6366).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 July 2019

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Harunor Rashid

1. Discipline of Child and Adolescent Health, The University of Sydney
2. Kids Research Institute at The Children's Hospital at Westmead, Westmead NSW 2145, Australia
Website | E-Mail
Interests: vaccine-preventable infections among travellers
Guest Editor
Dr. Ameneh Khatami

Discipline of Child and Adolescent Health, The University of Sydney, Australia
Website | E-Mail
Interests: pediatric infectious diseases; microbiology; vaccine-preventable diseases in children

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Gone are the days when travel was enjoyed only by the privileged. Globalisation and massive expansion of transport technology and systems have enabled even the less privileged section of society to travel far and wide, in search of a better livelihood, for recreation, to advance knowledge, or for spiritual need. Many people in various parts of the world are forced to travel as a consequence of conflict or natural disasters. Irrespective of the purpose, travel is often associated with detrimental health effects: communicable, non-communicable, psychological, and environmental hazards are all recognised threats of travel. On the other hand, increased international trade and travel have opened up new vistas for preventive medicine research. There is more to explore, and what is already known should be disseminated.  

This Special Issue will provide an overview of common health issues and emerging travel-related diseases, with emphasis on the prevention and control of these problems for travellers or expatriates to tropical or resource-poor settings, as well as for attendees of mass-gathering events. Original research works and systematic or integrative reviews on the medical aspects of pre-travel preparation, travellers’ diarrhoea, vaccinations, prevention of vector-borne diseases, refugee health, disaster preparedness, and travel health issues in humanitarian emergencies will be included. Some case reports or case series of exotic diseases may also be considered.    

Dr. Harunor Rashid
Dr. Ameneh Khatami
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Tropical Medicine and Infectious Disease is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 350 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • travel medicine
  • tropical medicine
  • vaccine-preventable diseases
  • emerging and re-emerging infections
  • vector-borne diseases
  • mass-gathering medicine
  • refugee health
  • disaster preparedness
  • humanitarian emergencies
  • pre-travel advice

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Open AccessCase Report Acute Pulmonary Histoplasmosis Outbreak in A Documentary Film Crew Travelling from Guatemala to Australia
Trop. Med. Infect. Dis. 2019, 4(1), 25; https://doi.org/10.3390/tropicalmed4010025
Received: 16 January 2019 / Revised: 31 January 2019 / Accepted: 31 January 2019 / Published: 1 February 2019
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Abstract
Histoplasma capsulatum is an endemic mycosis with a widespread distribution, although it is infrequently reported in travellers. In April 2018, five television crew members developed an acute febrile illness after filming a documentary about vampire bats in Guatemala. Patients developed symptoms after travelling [...] Read more.
Histoplasma capsulatum is an endemic mycosis with a widespread distribution, although it is infrequently reported in travellers. In April 2018, five television crew members developed an acute febrile illness after filming a documentary about vampire bats in Guatemala. Patients developed symptoms after travelling to Australia, where they presented for medical care. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Travel and Tropical Medicine)
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Open AccessCase Report Persistent Burkholderia pseudomallei Bacteremia in A Filipino Immigrant to the United States: A Case Report
Trop. Med. Infect. Dis. 2019, 4(1), 20; https://doi.org/10.3390/tropicalmed4010020
Received: 31 December 2018 / Revised: 20 January 2019 / Accepted: 26 January 2019 / Published: 28 January 2019
PDF Full-text (183 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Melioidosis is rare in the United States and endemic to Southeast Asia and Australia. Treatment includes an initial intensive phase of intravenous ceftazidime or meropenem monotherapy depending on severity. The following report describes a case of persistent bacteremia with ceftazidime failure and prolonged [...] Read more.
Melioidosis is rare in the United States and endemic to Southeast Asia and Australia. Treatment includes an initial intensive phase of intravenous ceftazidime or meropenem monotherapy depending on severity. The following report describes a case of persistent bacteremia with ceftazidime failure and prolonged meropenem therapy on a ceftazidime-susceptible strain of Burkholderia pseudomallei. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Travel and Tropical Medicine)
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