Topical Collection "Environmental and Health Risks of Nanotechnology"

Editors

Collection Editor
Dr. Laura Braydich-Stolle

Molecular Bioeffects Branch, Bioeffects Division, Human Effectiveness Directorate, AFRL, USA
E-Mail
Interests: toxicology, in vitro, exposure, nanomaterials
Collection Editor
Prof. Dr. Saber M. Hussain

Molecular Bioeffects Branch, Bioeffects Division, Human Effectiveness Directorate, AFRL, USA
Website | E-Mail
Interests: toxicology, risk assessment, exposure, nanobiotechnology, nanotoxicology

Topical Collection Information

Dear Colleagues,

Nanotechnology has great potential for medical and consumer applications, such as targeted drug delivery, optical imaging diagnostics, antimicrobials for wound dressings, and cosmetics, etc. Furthermore, nanomaterial (NM) applications are also being realized in clean energy, water treatment, pollution reduction, and the design of improved materials. Currently, over 1,600 consumer products are on the market that have incorporated NMs in order to enhance product capabilities. In addition to the small size of NMs, several parameters contribute to NM-enhanced magnetic, electrical, optical, mechanical, and structural properties. Many of these characteristics, such as elemental composition, charge, shape, crystallinity, surface area, solubility, degree and pattern of aggregation, and surface chemistry have the potential to also generate toxicity. In view of the increasing application of NMs, there is a growing level of exposure to NMs. Consequently, it is important to answer questions regarding the safety of these materials. In this Special Issue, we invite authors to submit manuscripts that have evaluated the environmental health and safety of nanomaterials. We require detailed characterizations of the nanomaterials used in studies.

Dr. Laura Braydich-Stolle
Prof. Dr. Saber M. Hussain
Collection Editors

Submission

Manuscripts for the topical collection can be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on this website. The topical collection considers regular research articles, short communications and review articles. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are refereed through a peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Toxics is an international peer-reviewed Open Access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. For the first couple of issues the Article Processing Charge (APC) will be waived for well-prepared manuscripts. English correction and/or formatting fees of 250 CHF (Swiss Francs) will be charged in certain cases for those articles accepted for publication that require extensive additional formatting and/or English corrections.

Keywords

  • nanomaterials
  • exposure
  • toxicity
  • nanotoxicology
  • risk assessment
  • characterization

Published Papers (2 papers)

2017

Jump to: 2015

Open AccessReview Exposure to Inorganic Nanoparticles: Routes of Entry, Immune Response, Biodistribution and In Vitro/In Vivo Toxicity Evaluation
Received: 8 August 2017 / Revised: 9 October 2017 / Accepted: 9 October 2017 / Published: 17 October 2017
Cited by 9 | PDF Full-text (1849 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The development of different kinds of nanoparticles, showing different physico-chemical properties, has fostered their large use in many fields, including medicine. As a consequence, inorganic nanoparticles (e.g., metals or semiconductors), have raised issues about their potential toxicity. The scientific community is investigating the
[...] Read more.
The development of different kinds of nanoparticles, showing different physico-chemical properties, has fostered their large use in many fields, including medicine. As a consequence, inorganic nanoparticles (e.g., metals or semiconductors), have raised issues about their potential toxicity. The scientific community is investigating the toxicity mechanisms of these materials, in vitro and in vivo, in order to provide accurate references concerning their use. This review will give the readers a thorough exploration on the entry mechanisms of inorganic nanoparticles in the human body, such as titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2NPs), silicon dioxide nanoparticles (SiO2NPs), zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnONPs), silver nanoparticles (AgNPs), gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and quantum dots (QDsNPs). In addition, biodistribution, the current trends and novelties of in vitro and in vivo toxicology studies will be discussed, with a particular focus on immune response. Full article
Figures

Figure 1

2015

Jump to: 2017

Open AccessReview Nanotoxicology and Metalloestrogens: Possible Involvement in Breast Cancer
Toxics 2015, 3(4), 390-413; https://doi.org/10.3390/toxics3040390
Received: 14 July 2015 / Revised: 22 October 2015 / Accepted: 23 October 2015 / Published: 28 October 2015
Cited by 6 | PDF Full-text (663 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
As the use of nanotechnology has expanded, an increased number of metallic oxides have been manufactured, yet toxicology testing has lagged significantly. Metals used in nano-products include titanium, silicon, aluminum, silver, zinc, cadmium, cobalt, antimony, gold, etc. Even the noble metals, platinum and
[...] Read more.
As the use of nanotechnology has expanded, an increased number of metallic oxides have been manufactured, yet toxicology testing has lagged significantly. Metals used in nano-products include titanium, silicon, aluminum, silver, zinc, cadmium, cobalt, antimony, gold, etc. Even the noble metals, platinum and cerium, have been used as a treatment for cancer, but the toxicity of these metals is still unknown. Significant advances have been made in our understanding and treatment of breast cancer, yet millions of women will experience invasive breast cancer in their lifetime. The pathogenesis of breast cancer can involve multiple factors; (1) genetic; (2) environmental; and (3) lifestyle-related factors. This review focuses on exposure to highly toxic metals, (“metalloestrogens” or “endocrine disruptors”) that are used as the metallic foundation for nanoparticle production and are found in a variety of consumer products such as cosmetics, household items, and processed foods, etc. The linkage between well-understood metalloestrogens such as cadmium, the use of these metals in the production of nanoparticles, and the relationship between their potential estrogenic effects and the development of breast cancer will be explored. This will underscore the need for additional testing of materials used in nano-products. Clearly, a significant amount of work needs to be done to further our understanding of these metals and their potential role in the pathogenesis of breast cancer. Full article
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