Special Issue "Neurotoxicity of Environmental Metal Toxicants"

A special issue of Toxics (ISSN 2305-6304). This special issue belongs to the section "Toxicology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 November 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Richard Ortega
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Guest Editor
Chemical Imaging and Speciation, CENBG, CNRS, University of Bordeaux, France
Interests: metals; neurotoxicology; neurodegenerative diseases; chemical speciation; chemical imaging; micro- and nano-particles; radioelements
Dr. Asuncion Carmona
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Guest Editor
Chemical Imaging and Speciation, CENBG, CNRS, University of Bordeaux, France
Interests: metals; chemical imaging; chemical speciation; neurotoxicology; neurodegenerative diseases; radioelements

Special Issue Information

Environmental exposure to metallic neurotoxicants is a matter of growing concern, since it may have very significant consequences for human health, from impairing child neurodevelopment to the neurodegeneration processes involved in ageing.

This Special Issue will focus on the neurotoxicity 1) of well-established metallic environmental toxicants either in inorganic or in organometallic chemical forms and 2) of emerging metallic neurotoxicants such as high-technology metals, nanoparticles, or radioelements. For all these metallic compounds, the evaluation of the risks associated with their release in the environment, the speciation analysis in environmental and biological samples, and the definition of relevant biological models to assess neurotoxicity are important research objectives. Many questions have also arisen about multi-element (cocktail) exposure effects, as can occur in the drinking water of some developing countries. The description of the speciation of the metallic compounds in the environment, and of the molecular mechanisms driving metal neurotoxicity, are key to prevent exposure and to suggest new treatments.

The aim of this Special Issue on the ‘’Neurotoxicity of Environmental Metal Toxicants’’ is to give a broad overview of the current work being performed in the field of the neurotoxicology of metallic contaminants, from the identification of emerging toxic compounds, to the assessment of environmental exposures and associated risks, to the description of the molecular mechanisms involved in neurotoxicity.

The scientific community will have to face many challenges to identify and prevent the detrimental effects of environmental metal exposure on brain health. We hope that this Special Issue will serve to increase the visibility in this research field, intensify collaborations, and proliferate information exchange between the different scientific communities involved in this research topic.

Dr. Richard Ortega
Dr. Asuncion Carmona
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Toxics is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • neurotoxicity
  • neurodevelopmental toxicity
  • metals
  • organometallic toxicants
  • nanoparticles
  • radioelements
  • environmental exposure
  • synergistic (cocktail) effects
  • chemical speciation
  • molecular mechanisms

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Review

Open AccessReview
Direct and Indirect Neurotoxic Potential of Metal/Metalloids in Plants and Fungi Used for Food, Dietary Supplements, and Herbal Medicine
Toxics 2021, 9(3), 57; https://doi.org/10.3390/toxics9030057 - 16 Mar 2021
Viewed by 410
Abstract
Plants and mushrooms bioconcentrate metals/metalloids from soil and water such that high levels of potentially neurotoxic elements can occur in cultivated and wild species used for food. While the health effects of excessive exposure to metals/metalloids with neurotoxic potential are well established, overt [...] Read more.
Plants and mushrooms bioconcentrate metals/metalloids from soil and water such that high levels of potentially neurotoxic elements can occur in cultivated and wild species used for food. While the health effects of excessive exposure to metals/metalloids with neurotoxic potential are well established, overt neurological disease from prolonged ingestion of contaminated botanicals has not been recognized. However, the presence of metal elements may affect levels of botanical neurotoxins in certain plants and mushrooms that are established causes of acute and chronic neurological disease. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Neurotoxicity of Environmental Metal Toxicants)
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Open AccessReview
Commonalities between Copper Neurotoxicity and Alzheimer’s Disease
Toxics 2021, 9(1), 4; https://doi.org/10.3390/toxics9010004 - 07 Jan 2021
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 684
Abstract
Alzheimer’s disease, a highly prevalent form of dementia, targets neuron function beginning from the hippocampal region and expanding outwards. Alzheimer’s disease is caused by elevated levels of heavy metals, such as lead, zinc, and copper. Copper is found in many areas of daily [...] Read more.
Alzheimer’s disease, a highly prevalent form of dementia, targets neuron function beginning from the hippocampal region and expanding outwards. Alzheimer’s disease is caused by elevated levels of heavy metals, such as lead, zinc, and copper. Copper is found in many areas of daily life, raising a concern as to how this metal and Alzheimer’s disease are related. Previous studies have not identified the common pathways between excess copper and Alzheimer’s disease etiology. Our review corroborates that both copper and Alzheimer’s disease target the hippocampus, cerebral cortex, cerebellum, and brainstem, affecting motor skills and critical thinking. Additionally, Aβ plaque formation was analyzed beginning from synthesis at the APP parent protein site until Aβ plaque formation was completed. Structural changes were also noted. Further analysis revealed a relationship between amyloid-beta plaques and copper ion concentration. As copper ion levels increased, it bound to the Aβ monomer, expediting the plaque formation process, and furthering neurodegeneration. These conclusions can be utilized in the medical community to further research on the etiology of Alzheimer’s disease and its relationships to copper and other metal-induced neurotoxicity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Neurotoxicity of Environmental Metal Toxicants)
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Title: Iron deposition and neurodegeneration
Authors: Jan Aaseth 1,2, Tim Hofer 3, Petr Dusek 4
Affiliation: 1 Research Department, Innlandet Hospital Trust, 2380 Brumunddal, Norway 2 Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences, 2411 Elverum, Norway 3 Norwegian Institute of Public Health, P.O. Box 222 Skøyen, 0213 Oslo, Norway 4 Department of Neurology and Center of Clinical Neuroscience, Charles University in Prague, 1st Faculty of Medicine and General University Hospital in Prague, Czech Republic
Abstract: Metal deposition diseases include neurodegenerative diseases characterized by localized deposits of iron. Among such diseases are Friedreichs ataxia, aceruloplasminemia and PKAN. Some chronic anemias requiring frequent blood transfusions may be associated with siderosis with pathological deposition of iron in several organs, including in liver and heart, but to a lesser extent in the brain. Orally administered chelating agents, such as D-penillamine to mobilize copper, and deferiprone and/ or deferasirox to mobilize iron, are symptom-relieving in several of these serious conditions.

Title: Mechanisms of Metal-induced Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Neurological Disorders
Authors:Hong Cheng 1, Bobo Yang 2, Tao Ke 2, Shaojun Li 3, Xiaobo Yang 1,4, Michael Aschner 2,* and Pan Chen 2

Affiliation:1 Department of Occupational Health and Environmental Health, School of Public Health, Guangxi Medical University, Nanning, China; 2 Department of Molecular Pharmacology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY, USA; 3 Department of Toxicology, School of Public Health, Guangxi Medical University, Nanning, China; 4 Department of Public Health, School of Medicine, Guangxi University of Science and Technology, Liuzhou, China.

Abstract: Metals are actively involved in multiple catalytic physiological activities. However, metal overload may result in neurotoxicity as it increases formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and elevates oxidative stress in the nervous system. Mitochondria are a key target of metal-induced toxicity, given their role in energy production. As the brain consumes a large amount of energy, mitochondrial dysfunction, and the subsequent decrease in levels of ATP may significantly disrupt brain function, resulting in neuronal cell death and ensuing neurological disorders. Here, we address contemporary studies on metal-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and its impact on the nervous system.

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