Special Issue "Particulate matter exposure and health effects"

A special issue of Toxics (ISSN 2305-6304). This special issue belongs to the section "Toxicology and Public Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 November 2018

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Pasquale Avino

Department of Agricultural, Environmental and Food Sciences (DiAAA), via F. De Sanctis, I-86100 Campobasso, Italy
E-Mail
Interests: environmental chemistry; life sciences; analytical chemistry; atmosphere; public health; Personal exposure

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

During these last years, the World Health Organization (WHO) has repeatedly raised the alarm about the close relationship between exposure to particulate matter (PM) and premature deaths worldwide. This alarm is as much stronger as the particle diameter are small, even submicrometer or ultrafine particles (UFPs) (< 100 nm). Further, the topic is even more complicated because PM is a very complex mixture of hazard compounds adsorbed on it and liquid droplets that get into the air (reactions in heterogeneous phase). The size of particles is directly linked to their potential for causing health problems. Once inhaled, these particles can affect the heart and lungs and cause serious health effects (e.g., premature death in people with heart or lung disease, irregular hearthbeat, asthma, decreased lung function, irritation of the airways, coughing or difficulty breathing), especially in sensitive sub-populations, such as newborns, infants, and older adults.

This Special Issue would like to deepen the relatioship between exposure to PM, particularly submicrometer and UFPs, and the aim of understanding the mechanisms allowing the rise in hearth/pulmonary pathologies. The use of models to assess both lung depositions and the risks related to exposure is welcome, as well as studies performed outdoor or indoor (both residential or working/industrial).

Prof. Pasquale Avino
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Toxics is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 350 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Particulate matter
  • Ultrafine particle
  • Behavior
  • Exposure
  • Human health effect
  • Deposition
  • Lung
  • Surfactant
  • Deposition model
  • Risk

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Meta-Analysis of NOS3 G894T Polymorphisms with Air Pollution on the Risk of Ischemic Heart Disease Worldwide
Received: 1 June 2018 / Revised: 22 July 2018 / Accepted: 27 July 2018 / Published: 1 August 2018
PDF Full-text (1954 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
The purpose of this updated meta-analysis was to investigate the effect of nitric oxide synthase-3 (NOS3) G894T polymorphisms, air pollution and their interaction on ischemic heart disease (IHD) risk across populations worldwide. Recursive partition trees, nonlinear association curve fit and geographic information
[...] Read more.
The purpose of this updated meta-analysis was to investigate the effect of nitric oxide synthase-3 (NOS3) G894T polymorphisms, air pollution and their interaction on ischemic heart disease (IHD) risk across populations worldwide. Recursive partition trees, nonlinear association curve fit and geographic information system maps were incorporated to verify results of conventional pooled analyses for sources of heterogeneity. Results from 61 studies (16,219 cases, 12,222 controls) revealed a significant increased relative risk (RR) of IHD associated with NOS3 894 polymorphisms TT (RR = 1.44) and GT (RR = 1.37). Subgroup analysis revealed that the TT polymorphism genotype had significantly increased risk of IHD in Caucasian, East Asian, South Asian, and Middle Eastern populations (all p < 0.05). It is important to point out that many countries demonstrated an average risk of greater than two, which identifies the NOS3 894 TT polymorphism as a potential causal factor and biological marker of IHD, based on criteria for strong evidence used in international consensus panels. These 10 countries include Ukraine, the United Kingdom, Brazil, Chile, Japan, South Korea, India, Iran, Egypt and Morocco. For these countries with elevated risk (RR > 2) from the NOS3 894 TT polymorphism, meta-predictive analysis demonstrated an increasing trend in air pollution association with increased NOS3 894 polymorphisms. Further studies are needed to explore the complexity of the associations among NOS3 gene polymorphisms per population stratifications within countries, detailed air pollution data for added specificity for geographic location across time, and disease risk. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Particulate matter exposure and health effects)
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