Due to planned maintenance work on our platforms, there might be short service disruptions on Saturday, December 3rd, between 15:00 and 16:00 (CET).

Special Issue "New Advances in Medical Imaging and Applied Radiology in Cancers"

A special issue of Tomography (ISSN 2379-139X). This special issue belongs to the section "Cancer Imaging".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 March 2023 | Viewed by 4660

Special Issue Editors

Dr. David A. Hormuth, II
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Oden Institute for Computational Engineering and Sciences, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712, USA
Interests: quantitative medical imaging; cancer imaging; radiation therapy; mathematical oncology; mechanism-based mathematical modeling; preclinical imaging
Dr. Chengyue Wu
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Oden Institute for Computational Engineering and Sciences, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712, USA
Interests: mathematical and computational oncology; clinical cancer imaging; medical image analysis; patient-specific modeling; breast cancer; glioblastoma
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Since its introduction, medical imaging has played an essential and multifaceted role in healthcare, and the evolution of medical imaging and image-based techniques is always closely associated with the improvement of the diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment management of cancers. Specifically, innovative imaging techniques provide increasing opportunities to observe physiopathological features which are otherwise only accessible and measurable through invasive techniques. The convergence of advanced imaging data with emerging imaging processing techniques, including mechanism-based modeling and statistical-based artificial intelligence, is rapidly translating to essential changes in clinical practices.

In this Special Issue, we would like to focus on research articles, perspectives, and reviews informing readers about recent innovations on medical imaging and associated applications on cancer healthcare. We welcome submissions describing novel developments in image acquisition, reconstruction, and/or processing along with their impacts on clinical healthcare, especially in cancers. These will include variable modalities including molecular, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computed tomography (CT), positron emission tomography (PET), ultrasound (US), and optical imaging. Manuscripts emphasizing the specific clinical applications of developed techniques are highly encouraged, including image-assisted disease diagnosis, prognosis, prediction, and treatment planning. We also encourage submissions that have a focus on technical development or experimental validation but show an important clinical potential.

Dr. David A. Hormuth, II
Dr. Chengyue Wu
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Tomography is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • quantitative medical image
  • advance image acquisition and reconstruction
  • image analysis
  • image-based diagnosis and prognosis of cancer
  • image-guide therapies
  • mathematical modeling

Published Papers (5 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Article
Prediction of Lung Shunt Fraction for Yttrium-90 Treatment of Hepatic Tumors Using Dynamic Contrast Enhanced MRI with Quantitative Perfusion Processing
Tomography 2022, 8(6), 2687-2697; https://doi.org/10.3390/tomography8060224 - 03 Nov 2022
Viewed by 445
Abstract
There is no noninvasive method to estimate lung shunting fraction (LSF) in patients with liver tumors undergoing Yttrium-90 (Y90) therapy. We propose to predict LSF from noninvasive dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) MRI using perfusion quantification. Two perfusion quantification methods were used to process [...] Read more.
There is no noninvasive method to estimate lung shunting fraction (LSF) in patients with liver tumors undergoing Yttrium-90 (Y90) therapy. We propose to predict LSF from noninvasive dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) MRI using perfusion quantification. Two perfusion quantification methods were used to process DCE MRI in 25 liver tumor patients: Kety’s tracer kinetic modeling with a delay-fitted global arterial input function (AIF) and quantitative transport mapping (QTM) based on the inversion of transport equation using spatial deconvolution without AIF. LSF was measured on SPECT following Tc-99m macroaggregated albumin (MAA) administration via hepatic arterial catheter. The patient cohort was partitioned into a low-risk group (LSF  10%) and a high-risk group (LSF > 10%). Results: In this patient cohort, LSF was positively correlated with QTM velocity |u| (r = 0.61, F = 14.0363, p = 0.0021), and no significant correlation was observed with Kety’s parameters, tumor volume, patient age and gender. Between the low LSF and high LSF groups, there was a significant difference for QTM |u| (0.0760 ± 0.0440 vs. 0.1822 ± 0.1225 mm/s, p = 0.0011), and Kety’s Ktrans (0.0401 ± 0.0360 vs 0.1198 ± 0.3048, p = 0.0471) and Ve (0.0900 ± 0.0307 vs. 0.1495 ± 0.0485, p = 0.0114). The area under the curve (AUC) for distinguishing between low LSF and high LSF was 0.87 for |u|, 0.80 for Ve and 0.74 for Ktrans. Noninvasive prediction of LSF is feasible from DCE MRI with QTM velocity postprocessing. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Advances in Medical Imaging and Applied Radiology in Cancers)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Clinical Value of Diffusion-Weighted Whole-Body Imaging with Background Body Signal Suppression (DWIBS) for Staging of Patients with Suspected Head and Neck Cancer
Tomography 2022, 8(5), 2522-2532; https://doi.org/10.3390/tomography8050210 - 09 Oct 2022
Viewed by 538
Abstract
(1) Background: To determine the importance of diffusion-weighted whole-body MRI with background body signal suppression (DWIBS) in the staging process of patients with suspected head and neck carcinomas. (2) Methods: A total of 30 patients (24 male, 6 female) with a median age [...] Read more.
(1) Background: To determine the importance of diffusion-weighted whole-body MRI with background body signal suppression (DWIBS) in the staging process of patients with suspected head and neck carcinomas. (2) Methods: A total of 30 patients (24 male, 6 female) with a median age of 67 years with clinically suspected head and neck carcinoma with pathologic cervical nodal swelling in ultrasound underwent the staging procedure with computed tomography (CT) and whole-body MRI including DWIBS. (3) Results: In a total of 9 patients, abnormalities in the routine work-up of pretherapeutic staging were found. Five cases of either secondary cancer or distant metastases were only visible in DWIBS, while being missed on CT. One diagnosis was only detectable in CT and not in DWIBS, whereas three diagnoses were recognizable in both modalities. (4) Conclusions: DWIBS in addition to a standard neck MRI in cervical lymphadenopathy suspicious for head and neck cancer yielded additional clinically relevant diagnoses in 17% of cases that would have been missed by current staging routine procedures. DWIBS offered a negative predictive value of 98.78% for ruling out distant metastases or secondary malignancies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Advances in Medical Imaging and Applied Radiology in Cancers)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Cytoreductive Surgical Treatment of Pleural Mesothelioma in a Porcine Model Using Magnetic-Resonance-Guided Focused Ultrasound Surgery (MRgFUS) and Radiofrequency Ablation (RFA)
Tomography 2022, 8(5), 2232-2242; https://doi.org/10.3390/tomography8050187 - 03 Sep 2022
Viewed by 1027
Abstract
A combination of surgery and chemotherapy is the most effective treatment available for Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma (MPM). However, both cause significant collateral damage and cannot eliminate residual microscopic disease. This investigation aimed to compare and determine the feasibility of utilizing Radiofrequency Ablation (RFA) [...] Read more.
A combination of surgery and chemotherapy is the most effective treatment available for Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma (MPM). However, both cause significant collateral damage and cannot eliminate residual microscopic disease. This investigation aimed to compare and determine the feasibility of utilizing Radiofrequency Ablation (RFA) and Magnetic-Resonance-guided Focused Ultrasound Surgery (MRgFUS) as alternative treatments for MPM. A large animal tumor model was developed in 13 Yorkshire female pigs using the MSTO211H cell line. Two pigs were initially used to determine the cyclosporine dose required for immunosuppression and tumor development. Subsequently, 11 other pigs underwent tumor development. Of these 11, 2 died during cell inoculation. Small tumor masses and adhesions were present in the other 9, indicating mesothelioma development. Five pigs then received RFA treatment, and 4 pigs received MRgFUS treatment. Tumor model development and effect of the two treatments were examined using MRI and by necropsy. RFA and MRgFUS both successfully ablated approximately the same sized area in the same treatment time. This study demonstrates that RFA and MRgFUS are feasible for tumor debulking, and while MRgFUS requires more pretreatment planning compared to RFA, MRgFUS is a completely noninvasive procedure. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Advances in Medical Imaging and Applied Radiology in Cancers)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Article
Dynamic Contrast Enhanced Study in Multiparametric Examination of the Prostate—Can We Make Better Use of It?
Tomography 2022, 8(3), 1509-1521; https://doi.org/10.3390/tomography8030124 - 09 Jun 2022
Viewed by 921
Abstract
We sought to investigate whether quantitative parameters from a dynamic contrast-enhanced study can be used to differentiate cancer from normal tissue and to determine a cut-off value of specific parameters that can predict malignancy more accurately, compared to the obturator internus muscle as [...] Read more.
We sought to investigate whether quantitative parameters from a dynamic contrast-enhanced study can be used to differentiate cancer from normal tissue and to determine a cut-off value of specific parameters that can predict malignancy more accurately, compared to the obturator internus muscle as a reference tissue. This retrospective study included 56 patients with biopsy proven prostate cancer (PCa) after multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (mpMRI), with a total of 70 lesions; 39 were located in the peripheral zone, and 31 in the transition zone. The quantitative parameters for all patients were calculated in the detected lesion, morphologically normal prostate tissue and the obturator internus muscle. Increase in the Ktrans value was determined in lesion-to-muscle ratio by 3.974368, which is a cut-off value to differentiate between prostate cancer and normal prostate tissue, with specificity of 72.86% and sensitivity of 91.43%. We introduced a model to detect prostate cancer that combines Ktrans lesion-to-muscle ratio value and iAUC lesion-to-muscle ratio value, which is of higher accuracy compared to individual variables. Based on this model, we identified the optimal cut-off value with 100% sensitivity and 64.28% specificity. The use of quantitative DCE pharmacokinetic parameters compared to the obturator internus muscle as reference tissue leads to higher diagnostic accuracy for prostate cancer detection. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Advances in Medical Imaging and Applied Radiology in Cancers)
Article
Different Prognostic Values of Dual-Time-Point FDG PET/CT Imaging Features According to Treatment Modality in Patients with Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer
Tomography 2022, 8(2), 1066-1078; https://doi.org/10.3390/tomography8020087 - 08 Apr 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1053
Abstract
This study was aimed to investigate whether dual-time-point F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) imaging features had different prognostic values according to the treatment modality in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We retrospectively reviewed 121 NSCLC patients with [...] Read more.
This study was aimed to investigate whether dual-time-point F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) imaging features had different prognostic values according to the treatment modality in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We retrospectively reviewed 121 NSCLC patients with surgical resection (surgery group) and 69 NSCLC patients with chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy (CRT group), who underwent pretreatment dual-time-point FDG PET/CT. The maximum standardized uptake value (SUV), metabolic tumor volume (MTV), total lesion glycolysis (TLG), SUV histogram entropy of primary cancer, and the percent changes in these parameters (Δparameters) were measured. In multivariate analysis, MTV, TLG, and entropy on both early and delayed PET/CT scans were significantly associated with progression-free survival (PFS) in the surgery group, but all Δparameters failed to show a significant association. In the CRT group, TLG on the early PET, maximum SUV on the delayed PET, ΔMTV, and ΔTLG were significant independent predictors for PFS. In the surgery group, patients with high values of MTV, TLG, and entropy had worse survival, whereas, in the CRT group, patients with high values of ΔMTV and ΔTLG had better survival. Dual-time-point FDG PET/CT parameters showed different prognostic values between the surgery and CRT groups of NSCLC patients. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Advances in Medical Imaging and Applied Radiology in Cancers)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop