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Environmental Sustainability of Current Waste Management Practices

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Environmental Sustainability and Applications".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 December 2021) | Viewed by 24685

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Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
1. International Visiting Professor, School of Metallurgical and Ecological Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing, China
2. School of Materials Science and Engineering (Ret.), The University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052, Australia
Interests: waste management; resource recovery; environmental protection; sustainability; circular economy; metals and materials
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Guest Editor
Department of Functional Nanosystems and High-Temperature Materials, National University of Science and Technology “MISIS”, Moscow, Russia
Interests: recycling of metallurgical wastes and mining tails; nanomaterials; structural and mechanical properties; high-temperature materials and processing; heavy-metal extraction from wastewater; magnetism studies
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Guest Editor
Engineering Centre, Plekhanov Russian University of Economics, 117997 Moscow, Russia
Interests: renewable energy; thermo-electrochemical cells; nanomaterials; polymer composites; waste-water treatment
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue will focus on recent developments in the field of ‘Waste Management’ including solid and liquid wastes, their collection, segregation, disposal, and processing in a cost-effective environmentally sustainable manner. Different types of wastes may include municipal, industrial, medical, construction, demolition, agricultural, electronic, hazardous, sewage sludge, etc. The focus will be on mitigating various environmental issues and on steps taken to enhance the sustainability of current procedures and practices around the globe. Theoretical, simulation, or experimental studies on waste generation, characterization, economics, life-cycle assessment, and environmental factors in various scenarios are also welcome as journal articles or reviews.

This Special Issue will be part of the section “Environmental Sustainability and Applications” of the journal Sustainability. We welcome the submission of high-quality research or review articles focusing on waste processing, recycling, material recovery, and the environmental impact of sustainable waste management. Specific topics include, but are not limited to the following:

  • Novel technologies and upgrades;
  • Environmental impacts;
  • Economic factors;
  • Waste regulations;
  • Environmental policies;
  • Resource recovery;
  • Theoretical and experimental research;
  • Other topics of interest in the field.

Prof. Dr. Rita Khanna
Prof. Dr. Yury Konyukhov
Prof. Dr. Igor Burmistrov
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • municipal waste
  • electronic waste
  • industrial waste
  • medical waste
  • construction waste
  • agricultural waste
  • hazardous waste
  • economic factors
  • technology upgrades
  • environmental impact
  • sustainability
  • landfilling
  • urban mining
  • developing countries

Published Papers (7 papers)

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Editorial

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3 pages, 167 KiB  
Editorial
Environmental Sustainability of Current Waste Management Practices
by Rita Khanna, Yuri Konyukhov and Igor Burmistrov
Sustainability 2022, 14(4), 2321; https://doi.org/10.3390/su14042321 - 18 Feb 2022
Viewed by 1342
Abstract
The Special Issue on ‘Environmental Sustainability of Current Waste Management Practices’ was a part of the section ‘Environmental Sustainability and Applications’ of the journal ‘Sustainability’ [...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Environmental Sustainability of Current Waste Management Practices)

Research

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12 pages, 4506 KiB  
Article
Processing Dross from Hot-Dip Galvanizing by Chlorination Roasting
by Nurlan Kalievich Dosmukhamedov, Arkady Kaplan, Erzhan Esenbaiuly Zholdasbay, Gulzada Myngyshkyzy Koishina, Yeleussiz Bolatovich Tazhiev, Aidar Argyn, Yerzhan Itemenovich Kuldeyev and Valery Kaplan
Sustainability 2021, 13(22), 12530; https://doi.org/10.3390/su132212530 - 12 Nov 2021
Viewed by 1530
Abstract
Dross from hot-dip galvanizing is an important source of pure zinc ingots and zinc oxide for use as mineral additives in animal and poultry feed. Thermodynamic calculations have shown the possibility of solving the issue of dross processing by roasting using CaCl2 [...] Read more.
Dross from hot-dip galvanizing is an important source of pure zinc ingots and zinc oxide for use as mineral additives in animal and poultry feed. Thermodynamic calculations have shown the possibility of solving the issue of dross processing by roasting using CaCl2 and NH4Cl. The influence of the consumption of chlorinating reagents, the roasting temperature on the degree of sublimation of Pb, Fe, Ni, Cu and Cd has been investigated. It has been shown that the best results are achieved when roasting the dross with the simultaneous use of CaCl2 and NH4Cl in amounts of 6 and 15% by weight of the feed material. The optimal roasting parameters were established: T = 1000 °C, duration—60 min, air flow—0.1 L/min. Recovered pure zinc oxide composition (%) was: 0.05 Pb, 0.15 Fe, 0.06 Ni, 0.003 Cu and 0.001 Cd. The degree of sublimation of copper, nickel and iron chlorides was ~75%, with lead and cadmium at 90–98% of their initial amount in the dross. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Environmental Sustainability of Current Waste Management Practices)
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20 pages, 2215 KiB  
Article
Development of a Software System for Selecting Steam Power Plant to Convert Municipal Solid Waste to Energy
by Rotimi A. Ibikunle, Isaac F. Titiladunayo and Basil O. Akinnuli
Sustainability 2021, 13(21), 11665; https://doi.org/10.3390/su132111665 - 21 Oct 2021
Viewed by 1860
Abstract
A software system that enhances the selection of appropriate power plant capacity that will convert combustible municipal solid waste (MSW) into energy was developed. The aggregate of waste to be converted was determined and the corresponding heating value was established. The capacities of [...] Read more.
A software system that enhances the selection of appropriate power plant capacity that will convert combustible municipal solid waste (MSW) into energy was developed. The aggregate of waste to be converted was determined and the corresponding heating value was established. The capacities of steam power plants’ components required for the conversion were determined, using thermodynamic mathematical models. An algorithm based on models used to determine the energy potential, the power potential of MSW, the capacities of the components of the steam power plant, were translated into computer soft code using Java programming language; saturated steam and superheated steam tables, together with the thermodynamic properties of the power plant required were incorporated into the soft code. About 584 tons of MSW having a heating value of 20 MJ/kg was the quantity of waste experimented for energy generation. This information was input into the software as data and was processed. Then, the software was able to predict 3245.54 MWh energy potential for the quantity of waste, and electrical power potential of 40.54 MW. The capacities of the steam power plant components that were predicted include 100.35 MW of boiler power, 40.54 MW of turbine power, and 59.80 MW of condenser power. The methodology adopted will make it easy for the managers in the waste-to-energy sector to appropriately select the suitable capacity of the required steam power plant that can convert any quantify of MSW at any geographical location, without going through the engineering calculation and stress or rigor involved in the plant capacity design. Moreover, the accuracy obtained for the software is greater than 99%. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Environmental Sustainability of Current Waste Management Practices)
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18 pages, 991 KiB  
Article
An Overview on Solid Waste Generation and Management: Current Status in Chile
by Romina Cayumil, Rita Khanna, Yuri Konyukhov, Igor Burmistrov, Jumat Beisembekovich Kargin and Partha Sarathy Mukherjee
Sustainability 2021, 13(21), 11644; https://doi.org/10.3390/su132111644 - 21 Oct 2021
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 6097
Abstract
The widespread generation of, ever increasing volumes of and the sustainable management of solid wastes are global issues of great concern. Due to wide variations in composition and associated complexities, significant efforts are required for their collection, processing and environmentally safe disposal in [...] Read more.
The widespread generation of, ever increasing volumes of and the sustainable management of solid wastes are global issues of great concern. Due to wide variations in composition and associated complexities, significant efforts are required for their collection, processing and environmentally safe disposal in a cost effective manner. An overview of solid wastes is presented in this article with a specific focus on municipal solid wastes and industrial waste from the iron/steelmaking and aluminium industries. Key waste issues such as its sources, compositions, volumes, the factors affecting waste generation and waste processing are first discussed, followed by a further discussion regarding recycling, resource recovery, disposal and the associated environmental impacts. In a special case study, waste generation and management in Chile is presented in greater detail. Detailed information is provided on government initiatives and legislation for integrated solid waste management and its movement towards a circular economy. Measures include regulations on waste management framework which concerns the transboundary movements of hazardous wastes, persistent organic pollutants, the closure of mining activities and installations and restrictions on plastics disposal. With Chile being world’s largest producer of copper, significant efforts for mining waste management, its infrastructure and procedures are being put in place to reduce the environmental impact of the mining sector and its associated waste generation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Environmental Sustainability of Current Waste Management Practices)
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15 pages, 815 KiB  
Article
Toward Sustainable Environmental Management of Healthcare Waste: A Holistic Perspective
by Nouf Sahal Alharbi, Jawaher Haji Alhaji and Malak Yahia Qattan
Sustainability 2021, 13(9), 5280; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13095280 - 09 May 2021
Cited by 12 | Viewed by 5279
Abstract
The management of healthcare waste requires a sustained and holistic approach involving a range of parties. This is challenging for governments, especially in developing countries, where waste management systems have limited capacities for addressing the issue. Using Saudi Arabia as a case study, [...] Read more.
The management of healthcare waste requires a sustained and holistic approach involving a range of parties. This is challenging for governments, especially in developing countries, where waste management systems have limited capacities for addressing the issue. Using Saudi Arabia as a case study, this paper followed a multi-method approach, including policy analysis, observation, semi-structured interviews, and a focus group, to explore the country’s healthcare waste management system. The study estimated that Saudi government hospitals across the country, every year, throw away in landfills paper (27,000 tons), plastic (15,000 tons), food (10,000 tons), glass (8000 tons), and metal (7000 tons). Regrettably, all these tons of materials end up in landfills without any form of recycling. A number of challenges were identified, reflecting mainly the lack of a legal framework, waste training, coordination among stakeholders, and social responsibility. This study generated new knowledge about waste management systems by exploring how their performance is shaped by the processes occurring at the policy, organization, and individual levels. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Environmental Sustainability of Current Waste Management Practices)
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12 pages, 3887 KiB  
Article
Harvesting Waste Thermal Energy Using a Surface-Modified Carbon Fiber-Based Thermo-Electrochemical Cell
by Denis Artyukhov, Nikolay Kiselev, Nikolay Gorshkov, Natalya Kovyneva, Olga Ganzha, Maria Vikulova, Alexander Gorokhovsky, Peter Offor, Elena Boychenko and Igor Burmistrov
Sustainability 2021, 13(3), 1377; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13031377 - 28 Jan 2021
Cited by 14 | Viewed by 3481
Abstract
An important direction in the development of energy saving policy is harvesting and conversion into electricity of low-grade waste heat. The present paper is devoted to the improvement of the efficiency of thermo-electrochemical cells based on carbon fiber electrodes and potassium ferri-/ferrocyanide redox [...] Read more.
An important direction in the development of energy saving policy is harvesting and conversion into electricity of low-grade waste heat. The present paper is devoted to the improvement of the efficiency of thermo-electrochemical cells based on carbon fiber electrodes and potassium ferri-/ferrocyanide redox electrolyte. The influence of the carbon fiber electrode surface modification (magnetron deposition of silver and titanium or infiltration implantation of nanoscale titanium oxide) on the output power and parameters of the impedance equivalent scheme of a thermo-electrochemical cell has been studied. Two kinds of cell designs (a conventional electrochemical cell with a salt bridge and a coin cell-type body) were investigated. It was found that the nature of the surface modification of electrodes can change the internal resistance of the cell by three orders of magnitude. The dependence of the equivalent scheme parameters and output power density of the thermoelectric cell on the type of electrode materials was presented. It was observed that the maximum power for carbon fiber modified with titanium metal and titanium oxide was 25.2 mW/m2 and the efficiency was 1.37%. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Environmental Sustainability of Current Waste Management Practices)
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Review

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21 pages, 907 KiB  
Review
Red Mud as a Secondary Resource of Low-Grade Iron: A Global Perspective
by Rita Khanna, Yuri Konyukhov, Dmitry Zinoveev, Kalidoss Jayasankar, Igor Burmistrov, Maksim Kravchenko and Partha S. Mukherjee
Sustainability 2022, 14(3), 1258; https://doi.org/10.3390/su14031258 - 23 Jan 2022
Cited by 19 | Viewed by 3602
Abstract
Managing red mud (RM), a solid waste byproduct of the alumina recovery process, is a serious ecological and environmental issue. With ~150 million tons/year of RM being generated globally, nearly 4.6 billion tons of RM are presently stored in vast waste reserves. RM [...] Read more.
Managing red mud (RM), a solid waste byproduct of the alumina recovery process, is a serious ecological and environmental issue. With ~150 million tons/year of RM being generated globally, nearly 4.6 billion tons of RM are presently stored in vast waste reserves. RM can be a valuable resource of metals, minor elements, and rare earth elements. The suitability of RM as a low-grade iron resource was assessed in this study. The utilization of RM as a material resource in several commercial, industrial operations was briefly reviewed. Key features of iron recovery techniques, such as magnetic separation, carbothermal reduction, smelting reduction, acid leaching, and hydrothermal techniques were presented. RMs from different parts of the globe including India, China, Greece, Italy, France, and Russia were examined for their iron recovery potential. Data on RM composition, iron recovery, techniques, and yields was presented. The composition range of RMs examined were: Fe2O3: 28.3–63.2 wt.%; Al2O3: 6.9–26.53 wt.%; SiO2: 2.3–22.0 wt.%; Na2O: 0.27–13.44 wt.%; CaO: 0.26–23.8 wt.%; Al2O3/SiO2: 0.3–4.6. Even with a high alumina content and high Al2O3/SiO2 ratios, it was possible to recover iron in all cases, showing the significant potential of RM as a secondary resource of low-grade iron. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Environmental Sustainability of Current Waste Management Practices)
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