Special Issue "Higher Education in Innovation Ecosystems"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Sustainable Education and Approaches".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (29 February 2020).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Yuzhuo Cai
SciProfiles
Guest Editor
Senior Lecturer and Adjunct Professor, Faculty of Management, University of Tampere, Tampere, Finland
Interests: higher education policy and management; internationalisation of higher education and innovation studies
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Jinyuan Ma

Guest Editor
Southern University of Science and Technology, Shenzhen, China
Interests: higher education/comparative and international education
Dr. Qiongqiong Chen

Guest Editor
Southern University of Science and Technology, Shenzhen, China
Interests: social and policy studies in higher education; globalization, internationalization and educational reforms; academic mobility and academic professions

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues:

In both policy and research discussions on sustainable development, there is increasing attention given to two intricately interrelated transformations: societal transformation (or innovation in the society) and university transformation (or innovation in the university) (Cai 2017). Contemporary societal changes have been recently described as transformation from knowledge society 1.0 to knowledge society 2.0 (Rutten and Boekema 2012)—that is, fostering an innovation ecosystem (Oh et al. 2016; Smorodinskaya et al. 2017; Walrave et al. 2017). The core underlying knowledge society 2.0 is that knowledge is not simply distinguished between tacit and codified types as in knowledge economy 1.0, but is context-dependent. Consequently, learning and knowledge production are now taking place in the context of social interactions rather than in organizational contexts. The implication of this for an innovation ecosystem is that the core elements in the system are increasingly interdependent, comparable to the complicated relations of organisms in a bio-system. This may guide research attention from obvious relations of innovation actors, as tackled by current studies, to hidden relations between different components in innovation ecosystems.

In such a system, a university is not merely serving as a primary engine for economic growth through knowledge transfer (Etzkowitz 2008), but is required to be more socially responsible (Goddard and Vallance 2013). As put by UNESCO’s Chief of Higher Education Sector, Peter J. Wells, “Perhaps never before in recent history has the role of higher education been so intricately tied to the economic, social and environmental fabric of the modern world” (Wells 2017). The societal changes demanding broader roles of university also call for, and lead to, substantial changes within the internal fabric of the university. The innovations in both society and universities call for our renewed understanding of higher education in society, which becomes a new research agenda in studies on innovation in higher education (Cai 2017) .

This Special Issue calls for papers to respond to the new research agenda. We welcome papers that contribute to the discussion from theoretical, methodological, or empirical perspectives, and those which are of relevancy to both academic communities interested in the theme as well as policy and managerial audiences. Specifically, we invite research contributions to discuss the following issues, albeit not in a strict (exclusive) sense:

  • Relations between university and innovation ecosystems
  • Various roles of a university in an innovation ecosystem
  • Higher education and research policies addressing responsible research and innovation
  • Innovations of higher education in different contexts
  • Dynamics of the interaction between the university and other innovation actors in a transnational context
  • Theories elucidating the complicated interactions between the university and other actors in the innovation ecosystem
  • New methodologies in the new research agenda

References:

Cai Y (2017) From an analytical framework for understanding the innovation process in higher education to an emerging research field of innovations in higher education. Review of Higher Education 40 (4):585-616. doi:10.1353/rhe.2017.0023.

Etzkowitz H (2008) The triple helix : university-industry-government innovation in action. Routledge, New York; London.

Goddard J, Vallance P (2013) The university and the city. Regions and Cities. Routledge, London and New York.

Oh D-S, Phillips F, Park S, Lee E (2016) Innovation ecosystems: A critical examination. Technovation 54 (Supplement C):1-6. doi:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.technovation.2016.02.004.

Rutten R, Boekema F (2012) From Learning Region to Learning in a Socio-spatial Context. Regional Studies 46 (8):981-992. doi:10.1080/00343404.2012.712679.

Smorodinskaya N, Russell MG, Katukov D, Still K Innovation Ecosystems vs. Innovation Systems in Terms of Collaboration and Co-creation of Value. In: The 50th Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences, Waikoloa, Hawaii, 4-7 January 2017.

Walrave B, Talmar M, Podoynitsyna KS, Romme AGL, Verbong GPJ (2017) A multi-level perspective on innovation ecosystems for path-breaking innovation. Technological Forecasting and Social Change. doi:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.techfore.2017.04.011.

Wells PJ (2017) UNESCO'S Introduction: The role of Higher Education Institutions today. In: Grau FX, Goddard J, Hall BL, Hazelkorn E, Tandon R (eds) Higher Education in the World 6. Towards a Socially Responsible University: Balancing the Global with the Local. vol GUNi Series on the social commitment of universities. Global University Network for Innovation (GUNi), Girona.

Prof. Yuzhuo Cai
Dr. Jinyuan Ma
Dr. Qiongqiong Chen
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

Higher education;
University;
Innovation system;
Innovation ecosystem;
Science, technology and innovation;
Responsible research and innovation.

Published Papers (17 papers)

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Editorial

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Open AccessEditorial
Higher Education in Innovation Ecosystems
Sustainability 2020, 12(11), 4376; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12114376 - 27 May 2020
Abstract
While higher education has been considered as both an ‘engine’ for innovation and a ‘catalyst’ for sustainability development, the integration of both the ‘innovation engine’ and ‘sustainability catalyst’ roles is best reflected in higher education’s engagement in innovation ecosystems—the theme of this special [...] Read more.
While higher education has been considered as both an ‘engine’ for innovation and a ‘catalyst’ for sustainability development, the integration of both the ‘innovation engine’ and ‘sustainability catalyst’ roles is best reflected in higher education’s engagement in innovation ecosystems—the theme of this special issue, including 16 articles dealing with the topic from various perspectives. In this editorial, we outline an overarching framework about the relations between higher education and innovation ecosystem. When elaborating the framework, we provide a new definition of innovation ecosystem and identify three roles of university in innovation ecosystems, based on synthesizing relevant literature. The framework could facilitate readers to comprehend each of the collected articles and find synergy among them. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Higher Education in Innovation Ecosystems)

Research

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Open AccessArticle
How to Retain Global Talent? Economic and Social Integration of Chinese Students in Finland
Sustainability 2020, 12(10), 4161; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12104161 - 19 May 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
Global talent is the key resource for today’s knowledge-based society and sustainable economic development, and an increasing number of countries are aiming to not only train but also to retain international students as a potential supply of highly skilled labor in innovative fields. [...] Read more.
Global talent is the key resource for today’s knowledge-based society and sustainable economic development, and an increasing number of countries are aiming to not only train but also to retain international students as a potential supply of highly skilled labor in innovative fields. This article explores ways to retain international students as global talent through an empirical study on mainland Chinese students’ integration into Finland as an example. Based on data obtained through semi-structured interviews with 30 Chinese students, this research identified a number of individual and societal factors that contribute to their difficulties with economic and social integration. The findings demonstrate the complexities of the language barrier faced by Chinese students in non-Anglophone country contexts, and the important interplay between students’ social and economic integration. The host environment (nation-states and organizations) also plays a vital role in creating a more open and multicultural environment to enhance the capacity of such young people to integrate and innovate. This paper concludes with a number of proposals for individuals, organizations (including higher education institutions (HEIs), and nation-states to consider for innovating their policies and measures to better integrate global talent. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Higher Education in Innovation Ecosystems)
Open AccessArticle
Higher Education Institutions as Knowledge Brokers in Smart Specialisation
Sustainability 2020, 12(7), 3044; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12073044 - 10 Apr 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
The effectiveness of societal interaction has become a key aspect in evaluating the success of higher education institutions (HEIs) in performing their duties. These factors have been built into institutional funding models, and the funding of research follows a similar approach. External stakeholders [...] Read more.
The effectiveness of societal interaction has become a key aspect in evaluating the success of higher education institutions (HEIs) in performing their duties. These factors have been built into institutional funding models, and the funding of research follows a similar approach. External stakeholders are now having to share in undertaking some of the functions that will define higher education institutions’ external activities, societal interaction and impact on society. The European Union’s smart specialisation strategy is such a factor. This initiative allows higher education institutions to implement policies by building regional clusters. The counterparts of higher education institutions in these clusters of smart specialisation are knowledge-intensive enterprises, high-tech service providers, educational institutions, the Arctic Smartness Specialisation Platform and other centers of expertise for smart specialisation. In this paper, we have analysed the role of higher education institutions as knowledge brokers in smart specialisation though a qualitative analysis of 20 interviews conducted during the implementation of the smart specialisation project. Our findings show that the knowledge broker role can be promoted from four perspectives: the social dimension of networks; decision-making and control; cluster building; and exchange elements. The clarification and legitimation of the role of higher education institutions as knowledge brokers in these areas would give smart specialisation more impetus to reach its goals. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Higher Education in Innovation Ecosystems)
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Open AccessArticle
Changing Times at Cuban Universities: Looking into the Transition towards a Social, Entrepreneurial and Innovative Organization
Sustainability 2020, 12(6), 2536; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12062536 - 24 Mar 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
Since the 1990s, the socialist higher education system has faced several reforms oriented to satisfy social, economic, and technological demands. However, little is known about the transformation process of the socialist university system over the past two decades. This study provides a better [...] Read more.
Since the 1990s, the socialist higher education system has faced several reforms oriented to satisfy social, economic, and technological demands. However, little is known about the transformation process of the socialist university system over the past two decades. This study provides a better understanding of the entrepreneurial and innovative transition of universities located in socialist economies. By adopting mixed theoretical approaches, we proposed a conceptual model to understand the social, the innovative, and the entrepreneurial transformation of socialist universities. We revised and tested this model in the context of Cuban universities by implementing a prospective case study approach. Our findings show insights about the transition towards a business model innovation within Cuban universities. The determinants have been state regulations, the closing of the complete cycle from teaching to the commercialization of results, and the creation of hybrid structures to manage knowledge. Consequently, the university is facing managerial challenges related to its ability to explore and exploit its activities to generate social, innovative and economic outcomes. Our results provide practical implications for the university managers and actors involved in the transformation process of Cuban universities. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Higher Education in Innovation Ecosystems)
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Open AccessArticle
Tensions in the Sustainability of Higher Education—The Case of Finnish Universities
Sustainability 2020, 12(5), 1941; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12051941 - 03 Mar 2020
Cited by 2
Abstract
Universities are increasingly engaged in marketization and are also expected to transform into more sustainable institutions and be change-agents pushing forward the movement of sustainable development. This article introduces an analytical framework originated by Hahn et al. (2015) for understanding tensions concerning corporate [...] Read more.
Universities are increasingly engaged in marketization and are also expected to transform into more sustainable institutions and be change-agents pushing forward the movement of sustainable development. This article introduces an analytical framework originated by Hahn et al. (2015) for understanding tensions concerning corporate sustainability to the context of the Finnish university system in order to answer the following questions: What are the tensions relating to Finnish universities’ social and economic sustainability, and what strategies might universities use to cope with these tensions? Through analyzing interviews with university managers and officials from the Ministry of Education and Culture in Finland, we find that Hahn et al.’s framework is generally applicable in analyzing tensions of sustainability in universities, and we identify six tensions relating to the sustainability of Finnish universities. The tensions are related to (1) academic leadership and management legitimacy, (2) regional political tensions and university profiling, (3) political power over the university system, (4) changing academic work and profession, (5) academic autonomy and the role of the state, and (6) the future role of the university institution. Moreover, the article discusses issues regarding how to adapt the framework of corporate sustainability to the context of higher education. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Higher Education in Innovation Ecosystems)
Open AccessArticle
Developing the Entrepreneurial University: Factors of Influence
Sustainability 2020, 12(3), 842; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12030842 - 23 Jan 2020
Cited by 2
Abstract
Universities are increasingly paying more attention to developing academic entrepreneurship. This paper analyses the existing relationships between the relevant factors that contribute to the development of the entrepreneurial university. A previously validated questionnaire was administered to a sample of 84 deans of a [...] Read more.
Universities are increasingly paying more attention to developing academic entrepreneurship. This paper analyses the existing relationships between the relevant factors that contribute to the development of the entrepreneurial university. A previously validated questionnaire was administered to a sample of 84 deans of a number of faculties in Spain. The aim was to assess the universities’ development in terms of 13 influencing factors in encouraging entrepreneurship. The findings show that universities’ contextual factors had only minor influence on internal factors. Internal resources were found to be moderately or highly correlated with the processes put in place by universities to promote entrepreneurship. In particular, reference to entrepreneurship in a university’s mission, strategy, policies and procedures had a correlation with all the entrepreneurship factors analysed. Support from the management team and organisational design were not among the most important factors; however, they were positively associated with training and research processes, which, in turn, seemed to be strongly related to all factors in the development of the entrepreneurial university, especially with university mission and strategy. The findings show the relationships between the factors involved in the development of the entrepreneurial university. This will help universities to adopt measures that are better suited to promoting entrepreneurship. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Higher Education in Innovation Ecosystems)
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Open AccessArticle
Co-Creation for Social Innovation in the Ecosystem Context: The Role of Higher Educational Institutions
Sustainability 2020, 12(1), 307; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12010307 - 30 Dec 2019
Cited by 2
Abstract
This study examined the role of Higher Educational Institutions (HEIs) in promoting, creating, and sustaining social innovation. Recently, HEIs have extended their contribution beyond the traditional function of teaching and research to perform in socio-economic problem-solving. Considering the increasing trends of higher education [...] Read more.
This study examined the role of Higher Educational Institutions (HEIs) in promoting, creating, and sustaining social innovation. Recently, HEIs have extended their contribution beyond the traditional function of teaching and research to perform in socio-economic problem-solving. Considering the increasing trends of higher education involvement in social innovation practices, this study tries to examine the tools such as learning processes and systemic thinking approach that could be helpful to align the function and responsibilities of HEIs towards social innovation. The objective is to develop a theoretical understanding of the “co-creation for social innovation” concept and to understand the functions and activities of HEIs that can contribute to this process. To promote co-creation for social innovation, HEIs should actively encourage collaborative learning tools that focus on open platforms for collective action and systemic change that help them to engage with society and strengthen their collaboration with social actors. Different activities such as mutual learning and knowledge diffusion using a transdisciplinary approach, technology-based learning and collaboration, and relational transformation are key enablers that can promote social innovation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Higher Education in Innovation Ecosystems)
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Open AccessArticle
Developing Joint R&D Institutes between Chinese Universities and International Enterprises in China’s Innovation System: A Case at Tsinghua University
Sustainability 2019, 11(24), 7133; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11247133 - 12 Dec 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
This paper examines the role of joint R&D institutes co-established by Chinese research universities and international enterprises. Guided by an analytical framework of institutional logics in the evolution of the Triple Helix model, this study aims to explore the institutionalization process of a [...] Read more.
This paper examines the role of joint R&D institutes co-established by Chinese research universities and international enterprises. Guided by an analytical framework of institutional logics in the evolution of the Triple Helix model, this study aims to explore the institutionalization process of a joint R&D institute in the contexts of global and Chinese innovation systems; further, it analyzes which mingling institutional logics, respectively carried by a Chinese research university and an international enterprise, affect the collaboration between both parties moving from informal R&D collaboration toward an institutionalized organization. The case study method enabled the author to understand the complexity of the interlacing of international and national actors with regards to the joint R&D institutes. The contribution of the study to the existing literature is two-fold: on the conceptual front, it advances theoretical understandings of the interactions of institutional logics which result in varied patterns of joint R&D institute in a national context with transnational factors; on the empirical front, it examines the evolutionary path of a joint R&D institute established by a Chinese research university and an international enterprise. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Higher Education in Innovation Ecosystems)
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Open AccessArticle
Does Money Accelerate Faculty Mobility? Survey Findings from 11 Research Universities in China
Sustainability 2019, 11(24), 6925; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11246925 - 05 Dec 2019
Cited by 2
Abstract
In the context of global innovation systems, it has become a universal law that the resource elements of scientific and technological innovation, such as talents, flow along the track of high efficiency to the regions that can produce high benefits. As faculty in [...] Read more.
In the context of global innovation systems, it has become a universal law that the resource elements of scientific and technological innovation, such as talents, flow along the track of high efficiency to the regions that can produce high benefits. As faculty in research universities are important resources of scientific and technological innovation, developing countries such as China have sought to accelerate the transnational mobility of faculty by leveraging income. This study endeavors to gain a better understanding of the motivations for and the outcomes of faculty mobility at Chinese research universities and to determine whether attaining higher income levels through academic mobility can be considered a lever for facilitating change and improving the status of the academic profession in China. Using survey data from 445 faculty members at 11 major research universities in China, this study found a significant relationship between mobility frequency and indirect income. The findings also revealed, however that employees’ different attitudes toward income during the process of mobility are a key variable in confirming academic professional boundaries. The findings suggest that more successful mechanisms to attract or retain talented scholars should be developed and that these mechanisms should not focus exclusively on income. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Higher Education in Innovation Ecosystems)
Open AccessArticle
An Empirical Study of the Role of Higher Education in Building a Green Economy
Sustainability 2019, 11(23), 6823; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11236823 - 01 Dec 2019
Cited by 4
Abstract
The relationship between higher education and economic development has long been emphasized in the research on economics and education. Much of the existing literature focuses on the gross domestic product (GDP) as a core measure of a nation’s economic accounting system, but this [...] Read more.
The relationship between higher education and economic development has long been emphasized in the research on economics and education. Much of the existing literature focuses on the gross domestic product (GDP) as a core measure of a nation’s economic accounting system, but this may neglect some negative effects of production, such as resource depletion and environmental damage. Under such circumstances, the concept of “green GDP” was conceived to consider environmental influence simultaneously with the economy. It is, however, only theoretically feasible due to the complexity in calculating environmental pollution and the unavailability of data about resource consumption. Considering the measurement problems, this paper proposes a new approach to indirectly estimate green GDP. Using this approach, we mainly explore the impact of higher education on economic growth, especially regarding the development of a green economy. Results show that (a) higher education plays a significant role in building a green economy, and (b) green GDP is more responsive to changes in higher education than the traditional GDP. This study provides empirical evidence for the substantial contribution that higher education makes in promoting green economic growth to achieve comprehensive sustainable development. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Higher Education in Innovation Ecosystems)
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Open AccessArticle
Sustainability of the Belt and Road Initiative: An Integrated, Conceptual Framework for Instructional Communication in China’s Universities
Sustainability 2019, 11(23), 6789; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11236789 - 29 Nov 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
China is fast becoming a coveted destination and a hub for higher education among international students, particularly since the announcement of its Belt and Road Initiative (BRI) in September 2013. Consequently, China’s higher-education institutions are seeking ways to make international students’ educational experience [...] Read more.
China is fast becoming a coveted destination and a hub for higher education among international students, particularly since the announcement of its Belt and Road Initiative (BRI) in September 2013. Consequently, China’s higher-education institutions are seeking ways to make international students’ educational experience more consistent with their expectations. Nonetheless, instructional communication—that is, communication for the purpose of engaging students academically while reducing problematic misunderstandings in the classroom—is a bane of the educational experience of international students in China. Therefore, this article extends instructional communication and intercultural sensitivity models to pedagogical, learner-centered contexts in an attempt to develop an integrated conceptual framework on sustaining international student–Chinese faculty interactions in the classroom. That framework has three key constructs: (a) the faculty’s classroom behaviors and international students’ characteristics, (b) international students’ instructional beliefs, and (c) learning outcomes. They will serve as the basis for positioning instructional practices in responding more appropriately to enhancing the experience of international students as global learners and toward deepening and sustaining the internationalization of China’s higher-education institutions, specifically within the context of BRI. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Higher Education in Innovation Ecosystems)
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Open AccessArticle
Exploring the Triple Helix Synergy in Chinese National System of Innovation
Sustainability 2019, 11(23), 6678; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11236678 - 26 Nov 2019
Cited by 2
Abstract
Sustainable economic growth is closely linked to synergy in a national system of innovation. Although the dynamic synergy mechanism of the triple helix relations is essential to technology innovation, there are limited research methodologies to study or estimate the synergy effect accurately. This [...] Read more.
Sustainable economic growth is closely linked to synergy in a national system of innovation. Although the dynamic synergy mechanism of the triple helix relations is essential to technology innovation, there are limited research methodologies to study or estimate the synergy effect accurately. This paper introduces a new approach in non-linear complex systems theory to offer steps towards a possible solution to this conundrum. Based on the pattern formation of the Belousov-Zhabotinsky’s reaction, the paper constructs a simulation equation to explore the evolution mechanism by comparing the ideal state with the current state in China. The research finds that (1) under the ideal balanced condition of industrial absorptive capacity and academic knowledge transfer capability, the stronger incentive policies would play much more important roles than weak policies; (2) the performance of collaborative innovation is not optimal under current situation in China, but the industrial absorptive capacity, especially in private enterprises, has exceeded the capability of knowledge transfer in academia, and it has become the main driving force to promote future innovation. If the innovation policy can be focused on the high-level balance between the knowledge network and innovation network to promote synergy in China, the innovation performance will be accelerated more efficiently. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Higher Education in Innovation Ecosystems)
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Open AccessArticle
Postgraduate Education of Board Members and R&D Investment—Evidence from China
Sustainability 2019, 11(22), 6524; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11226524 - 19 Nov 2019
Cited by 2
Abstract
Increasing research and development (R&D) investment has been a common strategy to advance the sustainable development of economy and competitiveness across the world. Instead of external determinants, exploring the influence of internal factors such as the characteristics of board members is an important [...] Read more.
Increasing research and development (R&D) investment has been a common strategy to advance the sustainable development of economy and competitiveness across the world. Instead of external determinants, exploring the influence of internal factors such as the characteristics of board members is an important topic, yet under-researched. This article aims to reveal whether a firm’s R&D investment is related to the directors’ postgraduate education experience. Further, we want to explore whether this relationship shows heterogeneity in different industrial environments. We analyzed information from a sample of 1374 listed companies in China using descriptive statistics, ordinary least square (OLS) regression and instrumental variable (IV) estimation, and came to the following conclusions: First, the percentage of directors with doctorates significantly increases the chance of investing R&D activities. Second, in the second industry, the higher the proportion of postgraduate education degree holder as directors in a firm, the more expenditure the firm invests in R&D activities. Yet, there is no such association in the third industry. Finally, if a capital-driven strategy is adopted, directors with a master’s degree tend to reduce R&D investment in IT companies. Findings from this research not only enrich innovation management theory, upper echelon theory, and human capital theory, but also provide insights for corporate governance and national sustainable innovation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Higher Education in Innovation Ecosystems)
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Open AccessArticle
Mobility, Knowledge Transfer, and Innovation: An Empirical Study on Returned Chinese Academics at Two Research Universities
Sustainability 2019, 11(22), 6454; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11226454 - 16 Nov 2019
Cited by 2
Abstract
This study provides an in-depth analysis of the effects of academic mobility on higher education innovation through an empirical study on returned Chinese academics at two research universities in China. Based on data obtained through document analysis and semi-structured interviews with 15 academic [...] Read more.
This study provides an in-depth analysis of the effects of academic mobility on higher education innovation through an empirical study on returned Chinese academics at two research universities in China. Based on data obtained through document analysis and semi-structured interviews with 15 academic returnees, this paper aims to examine the everyday interactions between individual returnees and their environment, with a focus on exploring how different institutional contexts affect returnees’ capacity for integration and innovation. It finds that returned academics play an important role in promoting higher education innovation in China through mobilizing their transnational capital and resources. However, their capacity to innovate is largely subject to their working environment. Evidence from the study suggests that differing institutional contexts make a substantial difference to the reintegration experiences of returnees and to their contributions to institutional changes. This paper provides a window into the changing institutional environment in China and the academic lives of returnees there. It also provides important implications for talent policy decisions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Higher Education in Innovation Ecosystems)
Open AccessArticle
The Impact of Higher Education on Entrepreneurship and the Innovation Ecosystem: A Case Study in Mexico
Sustainability 2019, 11(20), 5597; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11205597 - 11 Oct 2019
Cited by 6
Abstract
Entrepreneurship is recognized as an engine for the economy. However, Latin America must promote higher opportunities for the creation of new businesses, especially for technology-based ventures. In this sense, the Center for Global Innovation and Entrepreneurship (CGIE) of the University of Texas at [...] Read more.
Entrepreneurship is recognized as an engine for the economy. However, Latin America must promote higher opportunities for the creation of new businesses, especially for technology-based ventures. In this sense, the Center for Global Innovation and Entrepreneurship (CGIE) of the University of Texas at Austin offers a Master of Science in Technology Commercialization (MCCT) that prepares students with methodologies to promote the creation of new businesses in Mexico. This study aims to know the contribution of training to the creation of new companies, and its role in the innovation and the technology transfer processes, from the viewpoint of the participants. This research presents a case study that analyzes the impact of the MCCT through the analysis of the data of a survey answered by 109 former students of this center. Findings show that the methodologies developed by the MCCT allow the creation of technology-based enterprises and entrepreneurial skills in students. This study presents good practices that can be emulated by other countries in the region, as well as recognizing the great value the role of higher education in creating synergies between actors of the innovation ecosystem that strengthen social and economic growth. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Higher Education in Innovation Ecosystems)
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Open AccessArticle
Training Entrepreneurial Competences with Open Innovation Paradigm in Higher Education
Sustainability 2019, 11(17), 4689; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11174689 - 28 Aug 2019
Cited by 5
Abstract
This paper shows the effects of training entrepreneurial competences on employability in higher education. It identifies teaching methods that are more effective in order to improve entrepreneurial competences. These are hackathon, team building, role play, and practical cases with entrepreneurs at a Spanish [...] Read more.
This paper shows the effects of training entrepreneurial competences on employability in higher education. It identifies teaching methods that are more effective in order to improve entrepreneurial competences. These are hackathon, team building, role play, and practical cases with entrepreneurs at a Spanish university. In contrast to the methods shown in previous literature, a mixed-method is proposed. Firstly, a qualitative technique based on three focus groups with the participation of lecturers, students, and entrepreneurs are used. Additionally, a regression analysis seeks links between entrepreneurial intention and employability with entrepreneurial competences with 329 students. The findings show the direct effect on skills appreciated in companies, using collaborative and practical activities focusing on competency perspective. This research work provides a new approach to training entrepreneurial competences that demonstrates the main role of Open Innovation enhancing the main stakeholders’ motivation and improving their skills. Useful information is provided to design the academic syllabuses and improve the level of employability of university graduates. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Higher Education in Innovation Ecosystems)
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Open AccessArticle
Building University-Industry Co-Innovation Networks in Transnational Innovation Ecosystems: Towards a Transdisciplinary Approach of Integrating Social Sciences and Artificial Intelligence
Sustainability 2019, 11(17), 4633; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11174633 - 26 Aug 2019
Cited by 5
Abstract
This paper presents a potential solution to fill a gap in both research and practice that there are few interactions between transnational industry cooperation (TIC) and transnational university cooperation (TUC) in transnational innovation ecosystems. To strengthen the synergies between TIC and TUC for [...] Read more.
This paper presents a potential solution to fill a gap in both research and practice that there are few interactions between transnational industry cooperation (TIC) and transnational university cooperation (TUC) in transnational innovation ecosystems. To strengthen the synergies between TIC and TUC for innovation, the first step is to match suitable industrial firms from two countries for collaboration through their common connections to transnational university/academic partnerships. Our proposed matching solution is based on the integration of social science theories and specific artificial intelligence (AI) techniques. While the insights of social sciences, e.g., innovation studies and social network theory, have potential to answer the question of why TIC and TUC should be looked at as synergetic entities with elaborated conceptualization, the method of machine learning, as one specific technic off AI, can help answer the question of how to realize that synergy. On the way towards a transdisciplinary approach to TIC and TUC synergy building, or creating transnational university-industry co-innovation networks, the paper takes an initial step by examining what the supports and gaps of existing studies on the topic are, and using the context of EU–China science, technology and innovation cooperation as a testbed. This is followed by the introduction of our proposed approach and our suggestions for future research. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Higher Education in Innovation Ecosystems)
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